University of Oregon

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Continuing and Professional Education

OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Offerings Fall 2019 Archive

An archive of Fall 2019 courses and activities is listed below. Current course listings can be found on the Course and Activity Descriptions pages.

Lectures

Shaping Place in Mesoamerica: Ten Ancient Cities from Olmec to Aztec, Part 1

Wednesdays, October 2 and 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

A lecture series offered in two parts. Registration is not required.

Part 1: Intro to Mesoamerica, The Olmec, the Mesoamerican Calendar, and Teotihuacan (1400 BC – AD 650)

Part 2 (offered in early 2020): Cities of the Ancient Maya and Aztec (AD 100 – 1521)

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Between 1400 BC and AD 1521, Mesoamerica (the most architecturally-intensive region of North America) was home to thousands of ancient kingdoms and a few metropoli, forged by people from dozens of distinct cultures. Each ancient city had a distinctive visual character. In fact, it could be said that the focus of ancient Mesoamerican architects was on shaping earth or stone to define and manifest the specific qualities and history of a place.

The first part of this course provides an overview of Mesoamerican geography, time periods, and the earliest monumental civilizations of the Americas. Along the way, we will uncover the secrets of the Mesoamerican calendar and examine the sophisticated observational systems of ancient astronomy.

This series of four lectures examines how important cities from different cultures built unique visual identities that reflected their local topography, explained their historical founding and the protection of their patron deities, and linked their location with a recurring astronomical phenomenon.

TOPICS

October 2: Counting Time/Space to Create Place: The Mesoamerican Calendar

One of the unique features of Mesoamerica was its overlapping calendar systems. To grasp the essence of Mesoamerican thought, one must have a decent sense of the calendar. It regulated everything – from a person’s name and fate, to the unfolding of ritual processions, to the scale of buildings and design of cities. Although the basic calendar cycles were shared by most civilizations, the days and cycles had different names in different cultures. So, get ready to have your mind twisted a bit.

October 9: Teotihuacan: Facts and Mysteries of an Early American Metropolis (200 BC– AD 650)

Around 100 BC, people in the highland Basin of Mexico began to build the largest urban center in the Americas, called Teotihuacan. Not only did it eventually have a population of over 130,000, but it became a cosmopolitan center with enclaves of people from other cultural regions. Despite these and other unsolved questions, the monumental pyramids still stand as testimony of the city’s greatness and power.

We are fortunate to have Bend resident Professor Carolyn E. Tate share her knowledge of the ancient art of the Americas. She curated the Pre-Columbian collection at the Dallas Museum of Art prior to starting her 23-year tenure at Texas Tech University. She has explored most of the major sites in Mesoamerica, with a special interest in the landscapes that surround them and the efforts each city made to create a unique place. Dr. Tate’s two books: Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City and Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation focus on how Mesoamericans situated their ritual-civic centers in place, history, and cosmology.

MEETS

Wednesdays, October 2 and 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

A Short History of Electronic Display

Mondays, October 14 and 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Photograph of Henry Sayre.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Join Henry Sayre, distinguished professor emeritus of art history at Oregon State University Cascades, for a fascinating look at the history of display from the slide to the digital image. Henry will be offering two presentations at the Elks Lodge.

On November 15, 1888, William Morris, founder of the British design firm, Morris and Co., went to a slide lecture by the typographer Emery Walker at a meeting of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society. That night he saw a series of brilliantly colored magic-lantern slides of photographs of illuminated books, projected through one of the newly powerful (likely German-made) gas lanterns that were even then revolutionizing the study of art history as well.

Today, the slide lecture has been transformed. The slide is dead, replaced by the digital image. The slide lecture is gone, replaced by the PowerPoint presentation. Kodak produced its last carousel slide projector in October 22, 2004. It ended production of Kodachrome slide film in June 2009, and on March 1, 2012, the company announced that it would no longer produce any slide film at all. We have undergone a revolution in the technologies of display, which has been of far more consequence than one might at first glance assume.

Henry Sayre is producer and creator of the 10-part television series, A World of Art: Works in Progress, first aired on PBS in the fall of 1997, and the author of nine books, including The Object of Performance: The American Avant-Garde since 1970 (University of Chicago Press, 1989), a children’s book, Cave Paintings to Picasso (Chronicle Books, 2004), and A World of Art, an art appreciation text now in its eighth edition.

Don’t miss this great presentation by a captivating speaker…a favorite here at OLLI-UO in Central Oregon!

Meets

Mondays, October 14 and 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Presenter

Henry Sayre

We Lost The Map

Monday, November 4, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Photo of person on a bicycle on a long gravel road with green fields and hills around them.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Ville and Kristen Jokinen share stories and photos of their amazing bicycle journey from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to Ushuaia, Argentina from June 2016 to February 2018—nearly two years and 20,000 miles!

Ville is from Finland and Kirsten is from Bend. They describe how they met and hiked the Pacific Crest Trail in 2011. That first venture launched their desire to keep moving and see the world. They figure if they can do the Pacific Crest Trail in one year, how hard would it be to bike from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska to Ushuaia, Argentina? And to complicate matters further, they decide to get married before they attempt the long trip to Ushuaia.

Needless to say, their stores and adventures are thrilling, chilling, and heartwarming. Their goal with this ride and sharing it with others is to bring us all just a little bit closer. Abolish the borders and barriers we build around us and open our hearts to others! 

Don’t miss sharing in a cycling adventure that spans two continents!

course manager

Kathryn Cullen

Exploring the Universe with Telescopes

Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

What extraordinary Central Oregon OLLI-UO members we have! Join new members and aerospace professionals Ron and Elizabeth Polidan as we explore the universe with telescopes.

Why do we look to space? What is dark energy? What is this mysterious substance called dark matter? Focusing on telescopes in space and their advantages over ground-based telescopes, the Polidans assist us in examining the early universe, galaxy formation, and exoplanets. We look at the possibilities of the next 50 years of space exploration, including the engineering challenges associated with various missions.

Ron and Elizabeth Polidan have worked for a variety of aerospace enterprises, including NASA. Since “retirement,” they have formed Polidan Science Systems and Technologies, a small consulting company that keeps them involved with the aerospace industry.

Ron (a PhD in astrophysics) has over 40 years of scientific research and space mission experience. He has worked in the academic sector as a research scientist, performed a variety of roles as a NASA civil servant, and was a manager in the aerospace industry. While at NASA, Ron did astronomical research and served in multiple project scientist/senior project scientist/management roles, ending as the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Chief Technologist. His multiple management roles (director, manager, chief architect) included developing mission concepts and overseeing the development of new mission concepts.

Elizabeth’s degree in biomathematics has led her to such varied projects as the study of college student drinking habits to helping prepare reports such as “Comparisons of the Proton-Induced Dark Current and Charge Transfer Efficiency Responses of n- And p-Channel CCDs.” Most of her work for NASA was on cameras and detectors, including those to be used on the James Webb Space Telescope.

Come explore the universe with the Polidans!

Course MANAGER

Jim Hammond

Meets

Tuesday, November 12, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Fun with Movies

First session: Monday, December 2, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
Promotional still for the 1941 film Citizen Kane

(This course will be offered on the first Monday of each month, December through May)

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

Focus

Movies are magic! Is it the darkened room…the wide screen…the music…the popcorn? Or perhaps it is the opportunity movies grant us to lose ourselves in all kinds of extraordinary experiences that real life can never provide. Great movies linger in our memories long after the closing credits. They move us to tears, make us laugh, and cause us to think about life in new and different ways. 

Join OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aiken for a fascinating series exploring the arts of movie making and the techniques that writers, directors, composers, cinematographers, and editors use to create illusions and manipulate their audience. Roger taught film studies and has hundreds of digitized film clips to illustrate these topics, many of which should bring back those magic memories. There will be plenty of time for comments and conversation.

Roger received his PhD in art history from Berkeley and taught for most of his career at Creighton University in Omaha, where he was also the chair of the Fine Arts Department and the director of the University Gallery. He has published books and articles on Renaissance art, American art, photography, and film. He has also exhibited his own photographs.

Join us for this fascinating look at the fine art of movie making!

TOPICS:

  • Monday, December 2: Film Music, part 1.  If you ask most people who have just seen a movie, “How did you like the music?”, they will often say, “Oh, was there music?”  We can easily remember what we see, but the music operates on the subconscious. Many examples from famous and not-so-famous movies allow us to explore what music does for movies, including things you would not expect. We discuss the origins and models for movie music from classical composers such as Richard Wagner, who invented the “Leitmotif.” Play “Name that Movie” and enjoy the music!
  • Monday, January 6: Film Music, part 2. More music!
  • Monday, February 3: Narrative and Time In Movies.  How do movies tell stories? How is time in movies manipulated? Screen time, plot time, and story time. The “audio/visual contract.” Unity, closure, and imaginariness. Direct continuous narrative vs. parallel narratives and flashbacks. Many examples from famous movies like Citizen Kane, Lawrence of Arabia, and Run Lola Run.
  • Monday, March 2: Cinematography and Editing.  The "Five C's of Cinematography": Camera angles, Continuity, Cutting, Close-ups, and Composition. The fascinating “Kuleshov Effect,” point of view, color and black-and-white, lighting, montage sequences, parallel editing, transitions (graphic matches), and some famous “long takes.” Many examples from Hitchcock to Spielberg.
  • Monday, April 1: The Western Movie and the Evolution of the American Hero.  Yee Haw!  This presentation will trace the evolution of the Western from the classic “good vs. evil” paradigm to the more problematic Westerns of recent years.  (Do you remember the Limelighters? “Gunslinger, where did you go wrong? You know in your mind you’re plumb insecure, that killin’ a man is real immature. It is just an attention getting device.”) 
  • Monday, May 6: Acting for the Camera:  So you think you can act? The “Eyes” Have it.  Michael Caine on “Acting for the Camera.” Some famous examples of heavy-weight actors and actresses strutting their stuff: Morgan Freeman, Helen Hayes, Tom Hanks, Jack Nicholson, Orson Welles, Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, Donald O’Connor, Bogart, Billy Chrystal—too many to name.

Meets

First Mondays, December through May, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Courses

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

Registration is not required

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Open your mind this fall to the possibility that what you think you know about science is not the whole truth. Join us as our OLLI-UO science class considers popular scientific misconceptions.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member and resident scientist-at-large, Jim Hammond, helps us examine misunderstood science concepts: aliens, what’s inside the atom, how planes fly, human intelligence, the truth about radiation, and even how quantum mechanics really works.

Professor Don Lincoln, a Senior Scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, introduces these topics in a magnificent 24-lecture video course offered through The Teaching Company.  The lessons bust myths, clear up confusion, and deliver scientific epiphanies that change how we think about the everyday world.

“Science,” Professor Lincoln says, “is built on facts, sure. But it’s also a methodology for determining and accepting—or rejecting—those facts. And inherent in science is a perpetual level of uncertainty and ignorance. Science has to be prepared to change and grow.”

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science explores truths about some of science’s most well known—and often-controversial topics. Ultimately, Professor Lincoln’s research-backed lectures offer newer, better, and more accurate ways to understand and evaluate commonly misunderstood scientific ideas.

TOPICS

  • October 1:  What the World Gets Wrong About Science; Franklin’s Kite and Other Electrifying Myths
  • October 8: The Ideal Gas Law (It’s Not Ideal); From the Ground Up; How Flying Works
  • October 15: From the Sky Down: How Falling Works; Myths of Orbital Motion
  • October 22: What’s Inside Atoms? The Truth Is In Here: The Science of Aliens
  • October 29: Misconceptions About Evolution; Nutrition’s All About You–and Your Gut Biome
  • November 5: Humans Are Not Peas: Myths About Genetics; Getting Smarter About Intelligence
  • November 12: Exposing the Truth About Radiation; Does Carbon-14 Dating Work?
  • November 19: How Statistics Can Lie to You; Does Thermodynamics Disprove Evolution?
  • November 26: How Relativity Is Misunderstood; E=mc2 and Other Relativity Myths
  • December 3: Why Do Black Holes Get Such a Bad Rap; What Banged and Was It Big?
  • No Venue December 10 and 17
  • January 7: Can You Go Faster Than Light? Untangling How Quantum Mechanics Works
  • January 14: Untangling What Quantum Mechanics Means; Is There a Theory of Everything?

MEETS

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

COURSE MANAGER

Russ Hopper

Turning Points in American History (Part 1)

Wednesdays, October 16–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

This course is now full, but members are encouraged to add themselves to the waitlist. Please call 800-824-2714 to do so.

Registration required and starts September 25. Please note: this lecture series is open to current participants with a six-month or annual membership.

*Part 2 of this course will be offered later in 2020.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

focus

Turning Points in American History relives the most powerful and groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States of America.

These Great Courses lectures, delivered by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell of College of the Holy Cross, offer a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U.S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, this course is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again. The topics are covered more from a "cultural history" or "sociology" perspective than traditional (dates, Great Men, etc.).

Whether they took the form of

  • groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts,
  • dramatic military victories and defeats,
  • nationwide social and religious movements, or
  • technological and scientific innovations,

these and other turning points forever changed the character of America politically, socially, culturally, and economically. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were subtler. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades.

Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood. Knowing what these events are, how they came about, and their dramatic effects is essential to grasping the full story of this great world power. It may even offer you vital clues as to where America is headed in the coming years and decades.

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate this new course.

This comprehensive course is broken into four different parts, allowing members to experience a history course without enduring a lengthy commitment. The second part will be offered after the first of the year.

TOPICS: Part I

  • October 16: 1617 The Great Epidemic; 1619 Land of the Free? Slavery Begins
  • October 23: 1636 Freedom of Worship–Roger Williams; 1654 Yearning to Breathe Free–Immigration
  • October 30: 1676 Near Disaster–King Philip’s War; 1735 Freedom of the Press–The Zenger Trial
  • November 6: 1773 Liberty! The Boston Tea Party; 1776 We’re Outta Here–Declaring Independence
  • November 13: 1777 Game Changer–The Battle of Saratoga; 1786 Toward a Constitution Shay’s Rebellion
  • November 20: 1789 Samuel Slater–The Industrial Revolution; 1800 Peaceful Transfer–The Election of 1800
  • December 4: 1803 Supreme Authority–Marbury v. Madison; 1807 On the Move–Transportation Revolution
  • December 11:  1816 One Man, One Vote–Expanding Suffrage; 1821 Reborn–The Second Great Awakening

MEETS

Wednesdays, October 16–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Open your mind this fall to the possibility that what you think you know about science is not the whole truth. Join us as our OLLI-UO science class considers popular scientific misconceptions.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member and resident scientist-at-large, Jim Hammond, helps us examine misunderstood science concepts: aliens, what’s inside the atom, how planes fly, human intelligence, the truth about radiation, and even how quantum mechanics really works.

Professor Don Lincoln, a Senior Scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, introduces these topics in a magnificent 24-lecture video course offered through The Teaching Company.  The lessons bust myths, clear up confusion, and deliver scientific epiphanies that change how we think about the everyday world.

“Science,” Professor Lincoln says, “is built on facts, sure. But it’s also a methodology for determining and accepting—or rejecting—those facts. And inherent in science is a perpetual level of uncertainty and ignorance. Science has to be prepared to change and grow.”

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science explores truths about some of science’s most well known—and often-controversial topics. Ultimately, Professor Lincoln’s research-backed lectures offer newer, better, and more accurate ways to understand and evaluate commonly misunderstood scientific ideas.

TOPICS

  • November 5: Humans Are Not Peas: Myths About Genetics; Getting Smarter About Intelligence
  • November 12: Exposing the Truth About Radiation; Does Carbon-14 Dating Work?
  • November 19: How Statistics Can Lie to You; Does Thermodynamics Disprove Evolution?
  • November 26: How Relativity Is Misunderstood; E=mc2 and Other Relativity Myths
  • December 3: Why Do Black Holes Get Such a Bad Rap; What Banged and Was It Big?
  • December 10: no class
  • December 17: no class
  • January 7: Can You Go Faster Than Light? Untangling How Quantum Mechanics Works
  • January 14: Untangling What Quantum Mechanics Means; Is There a Theory of Everything?

MEETS

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

COURSE MANAGER

Jim Hammond

Turning Points in American History (Part 1)

Wednesdays, October 2–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration required. This class is full; please call the main office at 800-824-2714 to be added to the waitlist.

*Part 2 of this course will be offered in winter 2020. Dates and details to come.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

Turning Points in American History relives the most powerful and groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States of America.

These Great Courses lectures, delivered by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell of College of the Holy Cross, offer a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U. S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, this course is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again. The topics are covered more from a "cultural history" or "sociology" perspective than traditional (dates, Great Men, etc.).

Whether they took the form of groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts, dramatic military victories and defeats, nationwide social and religious movements, or technological and scientific innovations, these and other turning points forever changed the character of America politically, socially, culturally, and economically. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades.

Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood. Knowing what these events are, how they came about, and their dramatic effects is essential to grasping the full story of this great world power. It may even offer you vital clues as to where America is headed in the coming years and decades.

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate this new course.

This comprehensive course is broken into four different parts, allowing members to experience a history course without enduring a lengthy commitment. The second part will be offered after the first of the year.

TOPICS: Part I

  • November 6:  1773 Liberty! The Boston Tea Party; 1776 We’re Outta Here–Declaring Independence
  • November 13:  1777 Game Changer–The Battle of Saratoga
  • November 20: 1786 Toward a Constitution–Shay’s Rebellion
  • December 4:  1789 Samuel Slater–The Industrial Revolution; 1800 Peaceful Transfer–The Election of 1800
  • December 11:  1803 Supreme Authority–Marbury v. Madison; 1807 On the Move–Transportation Revolution

MEETS

Wednesdays, October 16-December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Turning Points in American History

Wednesdays, October 2–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is required, and the course is full.

Part 2 of this course will be offered later in 2020

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

Turning Points in American History relives the most powerful and groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States of America.

These Great Courses lectures, delivered by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell of College of the Holy Cross, offer a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U. S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, this course is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again. The topics are covered more from a "cultural history" or "sociology" perspective than traditional (dates, Great Men, etc.).

Whether they took the form of

  • groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts,
  • dramatic military victories and defeats,
  • nationwide social and religious movements, or
  • technological and scientific innovations,

these and other turning points forever changed the character of America politically, socially, culturally, and economically. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades.

Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood. Knowing what these events are, how they came about, and their dramatic effects is essential to grasping the full story of this great world power. It may even offer you vital clues as to where America is headed in the coming years and decades.

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate this new course.

This comprehensive course is broken into four different parts, allowing members to experience a history course without enduring a lengthy commitment. The second part will be offered after the first of the year.

TOPICS: Part I

December 4:  1789 Samuel Slater – The Industrial Revolution; 1800 Peaceful Transfer – The Election of 1800

December 11:  1803 Supreme Authority – Marbury v. Madison; 1807 On the Move – Transportation Revolution

MEETS

Wednesdays, October 16-December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

(No class December 10–December 31) 

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Open your mind this fall to the possibility that what you think you know about science is not the whole truth. Join us as our OLLI-UO science class considers popular scientific misconceptions.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member and resident scientist-at-large, Jim Hammond, helps us examine misunderstood science concepts: aliens, what’s inside the atom, how planes fly, human intelligence, the truth about radiation, and even how quantum mechanics really works.

Professor Don Lincoln, a Senior Scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, introduces these topics in a magnificent 24-lecture video course offered through The Teaching Company.  The lessons bust myths, clear up confusion, and deliver scientific epiphanies that change how we think about the everyday world.

“Science,” Professor Lincoln says, “is built on facts, sure. But it’s also a methodology for determining and accepting—or rejecting—those facts. And inherent in science is a perpetual level of uncertainty and ignorance. Science has to be prepared to change and grow.”

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science explores truths about some of science’s most well-known—and often-controversial topics. Ultimately, Professor Lincoln’s research-backed lectures offer newer, better, and more accurate ways to understand and evaluate commonly misunderstood scientific ideas.

TOPICS

  • December 3: Why Do Black Holes Get Such a Bad Rap; What Banged and Was It Big?
  • December 10 and 17: NO CLASS (venue unavailable)
  • January 7: Can You Go Faster Than Light? Untangling How Quantum Mechanics Works
  • January 14: Untangling What Quantum Mechanics Means; Is There a Theory of Everything?

MEETS

Tuesdays, October 1 through January 14, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

(No class December 10 through December 31) 

COURSE MANAGER

Jim Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Special All-Member Meeting

Wednesday, October 2, noon–1:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

A special All-Member Meeting has been scheduled for the afternoon of October 2, immediately following the third Mesoamerican architecture class. A light lunch will be provided.

Sandra Gladney, Executive Director of UO Continuing and Professional Education and Suzanne Butterfield, Central Oregon Governing Council President, will speak on Central Oregon finances—specifically the membership and fundraising targets we need to reach to meet OLLI-UO Financial Sustainability Plan goals for this year and beyond.

In addition to finances, the following subjects will be covered:

  • John Dulzo will speak on Council elections coming up and the need for members to run.
  • Elizabeth Polidan will speak on her new role as Volunteer Coordinator and volunteer opportunities
  • Kathryn Cullen will discuss the All-Member Survey results and action steps.

Please come be part of the discussion. OLLI belongs to all of us and we all need to weigh in with our ideas and preferences. We hope to see a big turnout!

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, October 3, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant

Cascade Village Shopping Center

63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Member Barbara Jordan will be making reservations for this month’s luncheon. Let her know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

First Friday Art Walk

Friday, October 4, 2:00–5:00 p.m.

This field trip is full. Please call 800-824-2714 to be added to the waitlist, as we are compiling names for future tours.

This field trip is limited to 15 participants. *If the field trip is full and/or you are interested in future art walks, please ask to be added to the waitlist for this class so that we can compile an email list and coordinate two groups in the future.

Member Kathryn Cullen has arranged a fun first Friday art walk field trip to three art galleries in Bend on First Friday, October 4. Participants will complete the visit before the galleries will be welcoming other visitors to their gallery at 5:00 p.m. so it will not be too crowded with non-OLLI visitors. Participants will meet at Red Chair Gallery (103 NW Oregon) for our first visit. The itinerary is as follows:

At each gallery, we will have one or two artists present to describe their work and their process, allowing time for Q&A. The gallery owner will also take a few minutes at the beginning to describe the gallery mission and introduce the artists.

Registration is required and the field trip is limited to 15 attendees. Participants will all meet at Red Chair Gallery promptly at 2:00 p.m. then will walk to the other two galleries. The three galleries are within a half-mile of each other.

Any questions can be answered by field trip coordinator Kathryn Cullen. You may obtain Kathryn’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

Deschutes National Forest–Bend Seed Extractory Tour

Friday, October 18, 9:00–11:30 a.m.

This field trip is full. Please call 800-824-2714 to be added to the waitlist.

Registration required and starts September 25. Please note: this field trip is open to current participants with a six-month or annual membership.

The Bend Seed Extractory (BSE) facility receives daily shipments of grasses, shrubs, berries and more from across the West, as part of an effort to collect and preserve the seeds of thousands of wild plants growing on federal lands. This unique and interesting seed extraction facility located in Bend is one of the major seed extractories, private or government, in the Western U.S. It's a critical link to native restoration of our western landscapes.

The BSE extracts, processes, tests, packages, and stores seed for more than 3,000 different species. Native seeds collected at the facility grow into plants that help restore thousands of acres across the West, in some cases improving the health of ecosystems that have been overrun with noxious or invasive plants.

The seed extractory has been operating in Bend for about 60 years, starting along with the former Bend Pine Nursery. It originally focused on getting the seeds out of pinecones, but in the early 1990s, the seed experts also started handling grasses, forbs, shrubs, and more.

Don’t miss this opportunity to explore a facility that is essential to our western ecosystem!

Deschutes National Forest Headquarters

63095 Deschutes Market Rd, Bend, OR  97701

Participants will depart from the Elks Lodge parking lot at 9:00 a.m.

At noon after our tour, we are planning a group lunch at Backyard Brick Oven Pizza (across from Elks). We will return to Elks parking lot at 1:15 p.m.

Our field trip coordinator, Gary Whiteaker, can answer questionsbtain Gary’s contact information by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu

Presentation and Tour of KPOV Radio Station

Thursday, October 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Deschutes Historical Museum
129 NW Idaho Ave, Bend, OR 97703

Member Pat Ackley has arranged a fascinating tour of Bend’s KPOV. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn about and visit a truly grass-roots, professional radio station!

Started in 2005, KPOV is a 24-hour, volunteer community effort, with just three staff. Over 100 committed individuals—including DJs—volunteer their time on a regular basis to make Central Oregon’s community radio station work for the community every day. KPOV’s volunteer DJs now locally produce over 50 shows, from local affairs to music.

We will meet at Deschutes Historical Museum upstairs classroom and walk across the street to the studio. The small studio can only accommodate half of the group at a time. There will be two KPOV presenters/tour guides. The plan is to have a brief presentation with everyone in attendance, then split the group in half with one group touring the studio first, while the other half stays in the classroom to hear more about the station from one of the presenters. The second group will then tour the studio and return to the classroom for more Q & A.

Expect to spend 45 minutes observing in tight studio space with somewhat limited lighting and a need for whispering. Registration is limited to 16 participants, who will be divided into two groups of eight.

After the tour, join us for at a nearby restaurant for an optional group lunch.

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, November 7, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant

Cascade Village Shopping Center

63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Member Barbara Jordan will be making reservations for this month’s luncheon. Let her know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

Experience OLLI

Friday, November 8, 9:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

The event is free and open to the public. Registration is required.

Experience OLLI—where we offer short classes to the public to give those who attend an opportunity to see what we are all about!

If you have friends who are retired, semi-retired, or soon-to-be-retired and wondering, "What’s next?” –– invite them to join this special event and explore the joy of lifelong learning at a half-day Experience OLLI session from 9:15 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Experience OLLI will be held at the Elks Lodge and features classes in science, art, and history. Tell all of your friends who are not yet a part of our wonderful learning community!

Strategies for Lively Discussion and Effective Presentation

Monday, November 18, 1:00–4:00 p.m.

Registration is required.

location

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

focus

Register now for an exciting initiative between OLLI-UO in Central Oregon and the Teaching Engagement Program (TEP) at the University of Oregon, coming to the Elks Lodge on November 18. Join us for an engaging workshop on how to plan, manage, and participate in an interactive and fruitful discussion. We’ll look at how discussion helps learning and identify strategies for dynamic and inclusive group discussions that are meaningful and enjoyable. We’ll also explore ways to bolster discussion group participants’ sense of community and their skills for addressing challenging topics and different perspectives. And what to do when conflict or disagreement arises. Finally, we will consider some tips for preparing and delivering engaging presentations that stimulate discussion.

The session will be facilitated by Jason Schreiner, Associate Director of TEP. His experience includes years of working with UO instructors to enhance and improve their discussion facilitation skills and their approaches to engaging students and other audiences in more impactful ways. Your participation is greatly encouraged, as this workshop represents a unique opportunity to engage with University of Oregon resources, including highly trained staff. The benefits will translate into the continued delivery of stimulating and valued programming to the OLLI-UO community in Central Oregon. Registration is required for this workshop and is available online, in person, or by calling 800-824-2714.

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, December 5, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant

Cascade Village Shopping Center
63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Member Barbara Jordan will be making reservations for this month’s luncheon. Let her know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

OLLI-UO Central Oregon Annual Holiday Party

Wednesday, December 11, noon–2:00 p.m.

Registration is required. Payment of $5 per person collected at the time of registration.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

The holiday season is here and that means it will soon be time for our Annual Holiday Party! Get ready to join your fellow OLLI-UO members in recapping our wonderful 2019 programming, discussing goals and activities for 2020, and getting to know our newly-elected Council members.

We will ask for your help in putting the party together. We need volunteers to help with decorations, setup, and takedown. If you have any questions about the party, or know already that you want to volunteer, contact Elizabeth Polidan.

This is a potluck! Members are asked to bring a dish of their choice (main dish, side dish, salad, dessert, or nonalcoholic beverages) and contribute $5.00 per person to help cover facility and refreshment costs. Guests and/or partners of members are very welcome. Please let us know what kind of dish you plan to bring by contacting Margie deLeon or signing up on the sheet at the back of the Elks Lodge. Please note: signing the sign-up sheet not mean you are automatically registered for the party.

Please remember to register through UO using the button above or by calling the office at 800-824-2714.Season’s Greetings!

Study and Discussion Groups

October

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, October 7 and 21, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation.

TOPIC

Selection: Strangers in Their Own Land by Arlie Hochschild

In Strangers in Their Own Land the sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild embarks on a journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country, a stronghold of conservatism. There she finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets – people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream–and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. She helps us understand what it feels like to live in "red" America. Along the way she examines the question of why people appear to vote against their self-interest.

November’s selection: Doing Justice by Preet Bharara

FACILITATOR

Kathryn Cullen

Course manager

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, October 14, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701 (boardroom)

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member over the course of the year selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Newlyweds Roy and Celestial, middle-class African-Americans, happily married and upwardly mobile, find their lives ripped apart when Roy is wrongfully convicted of rape and sentenced to twelve years in prison.  In a series of letters and first person narratives Roy and Celeste address the tragic impact on their relationship.  While Roy’s life disintegrates, Celeste must decide between her allegiance to a fractured marriage and a chance at a life of her own.

An American Marriage was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award.  It was on President Barack Obama’s 2018 summer reading list, won the 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction and was a 2018 Best of the Year selection by NPR.

November’s selection: My Antonia by Willa Cather

Facilitator

Deb Hollens

CoURSE MANAGER

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the Month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, October 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Deschutes Historical Museum, 129 NW Idaho Ave, Bend, OR 97703

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Carolyn Hammond

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, October 28, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We view films from a variety of genres selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards. Group members share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

TOPIC

Science Fair (2018) 1 hr. 30 min.

Cast:  Jack Andraka, Serena McCalla

Director: Cristina Costantini, Darren Foster

Writers: Cristina Costantini, Darren Foster, Jeff Plunkett

National Geographic Documentary Films' Science Fair follows nine incredible high school students from around the world as they compete at the International Science and Engineering Fair on their journey to change the world through science. Only one student can be awarded “Best in Fair.” “Supremely entertaining. An ode to the teenage science geeks on whom our future depends.” (Variety)

Science Fair was winner of the Festival Favorite Award at Sundance 2018.

Facilitator

John Dulzo

 

November

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, November 4 and 18, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation. 

TOPIC

Selection: Doing Justice by Preet Bharara

In today’s public square, “facts are not facts,” rhetoric drives fear and division, and common ground and empathy often suffer. In Doing Justice, Preet Bharara explains that while our times call for a sense of urgency, he counsels us all to take a step back and try to understand how justice is supposed to be accomplished. It turns out that the law has important lessons to teach in our quest for truth, dignity and justice.

Preet Bharara has spent most of his life examining and participating in our legal system. As the former United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, he has prosecuted those who would harm the public through violence, fraud and corruption. Bharara provides powerful examples from his career that that illuminate a path to a stronger and just democracy.

December’s selection: Prisoners of Geograpy by Tim Marshall

FACILITATOR

Steve Hussey

Coordinator

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, November 11, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Meets at Deb Hollens’ home for this session only. Members who have questions or want directions should request Deb’s contact info from osher@uoregon.edu.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Over the course of the year each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: My Ántonia by Willa Cather

Cather’s My Ántonia is an iconic story of American immigrant frontier living and one of her most recognizable novels. Published in 1918, the novel is part of Cather's “Prairie Trilogy,” set in Nebraska in the late 1880’s.

Jim Burden, a successful New York City lawyer for one of the transcontinental railroads, gives an acquaintance a memoir of his Nebraska childhood.  As a ten year old, orphaned Jim is sent to live with his grandparents in rural Nebraska. There he meets his close childhood friend, Ántonia Shimerda, a Bohemian immigrant girl who lives on a neighboring farm. The Burden memoir makes up most of the novel, following Ántonia from girlhood through motherhood in her life on the prairie.

The National Endowment for the Humanities chose My Ántonia for its BIG READ program. “Few books pack so much vibrantly genuine life into their pages as this classic novel of the American immigrant experience. My Ántonia teems with romance, violence, tenderness, cruelty, comedy, and tragedy—all bustling side by side in a narrative at once compassionate and gripping.”

December’s selection: There There by Tommy Orange

Facilitator

Deb Hollens

Coordinator

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the Month, 10: 15 a.m.–noon

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, November 5, 12, 19, 26, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Deschutes Historical Museum

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COordinator

Carolyn Hammond

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, November 25, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We view films from a variety of genres selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards. Group members share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

TOPIC

Executive Suite (1954) 1 hr. 45 min.

Cast: William Holden, Barbara Stanwyck, June Allison, Fredric March, Shelley Winters, Walter Pidgeon

Director: Robert Wise

Executive Suite has a star-studded cast and was nominated for four Academy Awards (Best Supporting Actress, Best Black-and-White Cinematography, Best Black-and-White Art Direction, and Best Costume Design).

Drama builds as the president of a furniture manufacturing company unexpectedly dies without naming a successor and sets off a scramble among Board members who must choose a replacement. Will it be the calculating business man, the youthful engineer or someone else?

FACILITATOR

Robb Reavill

Course Manager

Bonnie Campbell

 

December

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, December 2 and 16, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation. 

TOPIC

Selection: Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Tell You Everything You Need to Know About Global Politics by Tim Marshall

According to Tim Marshall, author of Prisoners of Geography, Ten Maps that Tell You Everything you need to Know about Global Politics, “all leaders of nations are constrained by geography. Their choices are limited by mountains, rivers, seas, and concrete. To understand world events, news organizations and other authorities often focus on people, ideas, and political movements, but without geography, we never have the full picture.” Now, in his new book journalist Tim Marshall “examines Russia, China, the USA, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan and Korea, and Greenland and the Arctic—their weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and borders—to provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders.” (Good Reads)

January’s selection: The Golden Spruce by John Valiant

FACILITATOR

Terry Schwab

Coordinator

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, December 9, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Over the course of the year each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: There There by Tommy Orange

Twelve interconnected Native Americans have their own unique reasons for traveling to the Big Oakland Pow-Wow – to reconnect, to dance, to record stories, to make money. In short intense chapters Tommy Orange exposes the multigenerational struggles with drugs, poverty, suicide, unemployment, and the yearning for a lost culture that complicate the lives of his characters. Family will be reunited with long-lost family, dreams will be fulfilled and shattered, and most characters will take part in the tragedy that will ultimately overtake the Oakland gathering.

Tommy Orange is an enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma. There There, his first novel,was long listed for the 2019 National Book Awards and was a finalist for the 2019 Pulitzer Prize. There There also won the 2019 Pen/Hemingway Award for Debut Novel and was awarded the Gold Medal for First Fiction from the California Book Awards. Numerous publications, including the New York Times and the Washington Post, chose it as one of their “Best Books of the Year.”

January’s selection: Map of Salt and Starsby Zeyn Joukhadar

Facilitator

Joyce Pickersgill

Coordinator

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the Month, 10: 15 a.m.–noon

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, December 3, 10, and 17, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Deschutes Historical Museum
129 NW Idaho Ave, Bend, OR 97703

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COordinator

Carolyn Hammond

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, December 9, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We view films from a variety of genres selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards. Group members share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

TOPIC

Singin’ in the Rain(1952) 1 hr. 43 min.

Cast: Gene Kelly, Donald O’Conner, Debbie Reynolds

Directed and Choreographed: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly

Written by: Betty Comden, Adolph Green

Singin' in the Rain is one of the greatest musicals ever filmed.  Filled with incredible songs, lavish dance routines and Gene Kelly's iconic song-and-dance number performed in the rain, it has achieved legendary status. Singing In the Rain was named #1 on the American Film Institute’s list of Greatest Movie Musicals in American Cinema (2006) and #5 in AFI’s list of the 100 best American movies (2007).

Set in 1927, the head of a movie studio believes that talking movies are just a flash in the pan, but two stars jump on board with no one in the studio having knowledge of the technology. Gene Kelly portrays the studio star who falls in love with an aspiring actress, played by Debbie Reynolds.  Her lovely voice wins her a place starring opposite him in the new “talkie” films, pushing aside his leading lady with the comically grating voice.

FACILITATORS

Rod and Linda Charny

Course Manager

Bonnie Campbell


 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon