Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon Courses and Activities Archive

An archive of past 2018 courses and activities is listed below.

January     February     March     April     May     June

January 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In January
Thursday, January 11, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Join OLLI-CO member Pat Ackley as she recounts her month-long adventure along China’s Silk Roads. Experiencing the incredible diversity of scenery and ethnic people along the way was a fulfilment of her own Marco Polo adventure fantasy.

Her 4,000-mile journey last May covered scorching deserts, soaring mountains, isolated villages, bustling new cities, awe-inspiring ancient ruins, and life-changing interactions with local people. Today, Western China is a divided country: Muslim Uyghurs and Han Chinese, with heavy security and police check-points throughout the region.

Pat's adventure started in the old imperial capital of Xian, with its Terra Cotta Warriors—a testimony to once-powerful ancient armies. Evidence of the spread of Buddhism can be seen in numerous archeological sites as well as at Labrang Monastery, home to the yellow-sect Tibetans. After a camel safari through the great Taklamakan Desert, her journey concludes on the border of the Pamir Mountain Range before visiting the Uyghur town of Kashgar and ending her tour in Urumqi.

"This trip was much more of a journey than a vacation,” she said. “Despite the early mornings, late nights, and great distances covered, it was the trip of a lifetime and it delivered everything I wanted . . . and more."

Pat is a retired educator and organization development consultant and has lived in Central Oregon for 25 years. She has a B.A. in education, M.S. in psychology, and Ed.D. in education administration. She serves on OLLI’s Governing Council and Program Committee and is responsible for the history programs.

Registration is required; call the OLLI-UO offices to see if there is space to attend.

Lectures
Monday, January 25, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

This is an exciting opportunity to hear some very special and high-level presentations about our Bend-La Pine schools has been organized and brought to us by The Bend-La Pine Schools Education Foundation Executive Director Michelle Johnson and President Wendy Graunitz. The Superintendent of Bend-La Pine schools has been asked to talk to us about the state of the District. In addition, the Technology Instructional Coach joins us with a demonstration of a Sphero robotic tool the Foundation has funded and is being used in several of our schools. The presentations are rounded out by a talk on what the Foundation does to bolster funding and innovation in the classrooms.

You can’t get this kind of multi-faceted presentation on our children's and grandchildren's schools—and the time to ask questions—anywhere else but OLLI.

Facilitator: Suzanne Butterfield

Courses
Wednesdays, January 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

Korea—MysteriousBeginnings; Korea—The Land of Morning Calm

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas–Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members

Wednesdays, January 3, 10, 24, and 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This class was last given at OLLI-CO in 2014 and was very popular.

Some of the lectures have been eliminated by the course managers to make this a 13-session class, ending February 14. Preregistration is NOT required. This class meets every Wednesday afternoon except for the third Wednesdays of the month.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Thursdays, January 4 and 18, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI-CO member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

Tuesdays, January 9, 16, 23, and 30, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Professor Don Lincoln, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). He is also a Guest Professor of High Energy Physics at the University of Notre Dame. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Particle Physics from Rice University.

Dr. Lincoln’s research has been divided between Fermilab’s Tevatron Collider, until its close in 2011, and the CERN Large Hadron Collider, located outside Geneva, Switzerland.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Study and Discussion Groups
Monday, January 8, 10:15 a.m.–noon

The January selection is The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler.

Facilitator: Barbara Crislip

The February book selection is Summer by Edith Wharton.

Tuesday, January 9 and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers’ Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

Mondays, January 22 and 29, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

The Invention of Nature, by Andrea Wulf.

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

The February book selection is Kindly Inquisitors by Jonathan Rauch.

Monday, January 22, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Crash (1hr. 52 min. 2004), starring Don Cheadle, Sandra Bullock and Thandie Newton, is the film for January.

Set over a 36-hour period, this movie shows the intersection of Los Angelenos whose lives are diverse in race, gender, class, and economics. It demonstrates how our biases—some subtle, some not so—exhibit themselves, both in everyday life and when those lives come into contact with each other. The film is thought-provoking and pokes at our self-perceptions as it attempts to find a basic humanity in all of us. Paul Haggis, who also directed, won the Oscar for original screenplay; Crash won the Oscar for best picture.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

Monday, January 29, 3:00–5:00 p.m.

The next "Intelligent Conversation" session will be held the final Monday in January, during which groups tackle the question, "Is healthcare a right?" Watch for an email announcing registration.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Tuesday, January 4, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to THURSDAYS starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Thursday, January 25, 10:30 a.m.–noon

In this special session, UO Vice President Roger Thompson will provide an overview of the division of Student Services and Enrollment Management and discuss the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon.

Members in Central Oregon will join Eugene/Springfield members for the session via videoconferencing. Vice President Thompson will also take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation.

 

February 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In February
Thursday, February 8, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

"To those who want to make a living online doing something you love: In the beginning, you will put in thousands of hours of work, losing money and sleep doing it. If you really want to succeed, don’t have a plan B. There has never been a better time in the history of the creative industry to build a sustainable career."

Peter Hollens, son of OLLI Central Oregon member Deb Hollens, is an entrepreneur, educator, American pop singer and producer best known for his work on YouTube as an acapella cover artist. With more than 1.76 million subscribers, his videos have reached half of a billion views on Facebook and YouTube since 2011. Hollens’ knowledge of the digital entertainment industry combined with a passion for his art, have allowed his new educational platform, the Hollens Creator Academy, to develop a meaningful and unique video course structure with the ability to teach musicians and creators how to make a living doing what they love. It prepares artists to begin pursuing their professional goals, create a personal brand, and build an online community while creating their art.

Peter has collaborated and performed with several outstanding artists, including Brian Wilson, Jason Mraz, Hunter Hayes, Gladys Knight, David Archuleta, Lindsey Stirling, Jackie Evancho, and The Piano Guys. He has released more than 160 digital singles to date and continues to release new music every other week. He has been involved with a cappella music since 1999 when he co-founded the University of Oregon’s all-male A Cappella group, On the Rocks. Preregistration is not required.

Wednesdays, February 28, March 7 and 14, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

Back by popular demand, Ann Sargent returns for a third series of short stories in American Literature. The stories will be about issues that face our world today—war, equality, politics, humanity and culture. A variety of stories and authors will be featured through readings and discussion.

Ann is currently a writing instructor at Central Oregon Community College. She previously taught OLLI courses in American Literature at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.

Registration is required and the course is limited to 25 participants. Watch your email for the announcement. Participants will receive a reading list prior to the start of the course.

Lectures
Monday, February 5, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

Join OLLI-UO member Fred Gientke as he discusses his new book, Custer Abandoned. The presentation discusses General Crook’s defeat at the Battle of the Rosebud and its impact on Custer’s defeat a week later at the Little Big Horn. The book is a unique study with an untold perspective about the Little Big Horn Battle and Custer’s highly-criticized strategy and defeat. For the first time a book has been written and devoted to make an indisputable case that General Custer should not be blamed for the destruction of himself and part of his regiment—that blame rests upon the shoulders of an American brigadier general. The Indians killed Custer, but Custer’s death was undeniably caused by the neglect and disappearance of a brigadier general who abandoned the campaign at its height and neglectfully retreated to the Big Horn Mountains to fish and hunt while waiting for long-delayed reinforcements.

Fred will project annotated maps and recent colored photos that illustrate the campaign trails, Indian village ambush sites, battle sites and more.

To bring Custer Abandoned to life, Fred devoted 12 years to research and traveled over 20,000 miles retracing the campaign trails. Preregistration is not required.

Courses
Thursdays, February 1 , 8, 15, and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

This 12-week session class is built around a 2017 Great Courses DVD series featuring Professor Scott M. Lacy of Fairfield University.

Professor Lacy offers an introduction to academic anthropology and its four subfields: biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and sociocultural anthropology. Over the course of 24 lectures, we learn how anthropology furthers our understanding of our world and ourselves. Specifically, we see how anthropologists deploy multidisciplinary methods to trace the origins of our species as well as the development of religion, agriculture, money, language, and many other pillars of the modern human experience.

Unit 1, our journey begins with biological anthropology to address the question: Who are we, and where do we come from? Specifically, we explore the origins of humanity, primatology, the spread of humankind, and a re-articulation of the concept of race.

Unit 2, we move to the question of our status as the sole remaining survivors of a long line of upright walking apes. In particular, we bring in archaeology and linguistics to work out how Homo sapiens outlived all the other branches of our extended family tree. This exploration reveals how tools, agriculture, cities, money, and language all contributed to the survival of our species.

Unit 3, we turn to cultural anthropology to explore why people and cultures are so diverse despite our singularity as a species. We’ll review the history and methods of cultural anthropology and see differences in the way people throughout the world practice and understand core pieces of humanity, including family, marriage, gender, sexuality, religion, and artistic expression.

Unit 4, we’ll apply all four subfields to see how an interdisciplinary approach helps us understand and resolve human problems. We’ll see anthropologists in action, examining conflict, forensics, health, economic development, ecology, and even the nature of happiness.

In sum, we will discover that anthropology digs deep into the geographic, temporal, and biological diversity of humankind to help us understand our remarkable diversity as a species. And ironically, the deeper we dig, the more we reveal the oneness of the human race.

OLLI Central Oregon members Pat Ackley, Bonnie Campbell, and Maggie Machala facilitate this course. Pre-registration is required and started mid-January. Call the office to see if there is still space.

Thursday, February 1 and 15, 1:30—3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI-CO member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

Tuesdays, February 6, 13, 20, and 27, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

The great theories of physics are like great works of art. And much like the greatest works of art, you don’t need to completely understand them in order to appreciate them. The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought. As you experience them, you will witness their progression toward ever-grander insights, pointing towards an as-yet-unfinished ultimate synthesis that will transform our understanding of the universe. Anyone, no matter what their training in science and mathematics, can appreciate this quest, which is nothing less than a search for the theory of everything.

There will be no need to get concerned with the mathematics since as Dr. Lincoln says, "We'll walk right up to the precipice of a full-blown calculation, but then we’ll step back before we get mired in the mathematical details." It’s a breathtaking trip, addressing such topics as:

  • Is the universe mathematical?
  • Feynman diagrams
  • Symmetry everywhere
  • Limitations of general relativity.

Preregistration is not required and all members are welcome to attend. Facilitators: Russ Hopper and Science Guys

Wednesdays, February 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas—Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

Wednesdays, February 7 and 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This class was last given at OLLI Central Oregon in 2014 and was very popular.

Some of the lectures have been eliminated by the course managers to make this a 13-session class, ending February 14. Preregistration is NOT required. This class meets every Wednesday afternoon except for the third Wednesdays of the month.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Study and Discussion Groups
Mondays, February 5 and 26, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group meets at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in February).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. The books listed below are those the group selected for January through May 2018. Each session is facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

The February selection is Kindly Inquisitions by Jonathan Rauch.

Facilitator: Steve Hussey

If you wish to read ahead, here are the nonfiction books selected through May:

March 5 and 19: Fantasy Land by Kurt Anderson
Facilitator: Rod Charny

April 2 and 16: The Code Economy by Philip Auerswald
Facilitator: Kathy McCullen

May 7 and 21: American Nations by Colin Woodward
Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

Tuesdays, February 6, 13, 20, and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

Monday, February 12, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Summer by Edith Wharton.

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

If you wish to read ahead, here are the upcoming selections:

March: Plainsong by Kent Haruf
Facilitator: Deb Hollens

April: No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal (Deschutes Public Library Novel Idea Selection)
Facilitator: Michal Haller

May: City of Women by David R. Gilham
Facilitator: Robin Robinson

All members are welcome to attend Page-turners as well.

Monday, February 12, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

A Street Cat Named Bob (1hr. 43 min. 2016), starring Luke Treadaway, Ruta Gedmintas, Joanne Froggatt, Anthony Head

Based on a true story, James Bowen is a homeless man and former heroin addict living on the streets of London, and down to his last bits of change. Bob is a stray cat looking for somewhere warm to sleep. When James and Bob meet, they forge a never-to-be-forgotten friendship.

Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Thursday, February 1, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to THURSDAYS starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Wednesday, February 21, 11:45–1:00 p.m.

Bring a brown bag lunch or enjoy some snacks provided by our Hospitality Committee and participate in the first all-member meeting with our newly-elected 2018 Governing Council. President Suzanne Butterfield, along with other Council officers, will inform members of the implementation status of the Sustainability Plans at both sites, other 2018 plans, and will invite your input during this crucial time for OLLI Central Oregon.

 

March 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In March
Thursday, March 1 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

We're pleased to announce a new 12-week Great Courses program presented by Professor Scott M. Lacy, Ph.D. Fairfield University. As a field of study, anthropology covers a lot of ground,from the language of primates to bones found in a desert to modern-day warzones. A survey of the field encompasses elements of history, biology,archaeology, linguistics, sociology, and cultural studies. It also involvesdata analyses, population modeling, urban development, economics, medicine,forensics, sexuality, art, and much, much more. Anything and everything thatrelates to humanity, anthropology approaches, demonstrating the common threadsacross world cultures and revealing the underlying connections that unite usall.

The course will befacilitated by OLLI Central Oregon members Pat Ackley, Bonnie Campbell, and Maggie Machala.

Preregistration is required and started mid-January.

Lectures
Thursday, March 8, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Mike Caba worked on an archaeological project in Jerusalem dealing with the Temple Mount. Come and hear a talk on the background of the Temple Mount and the reasons that Jerusalem and the Temple Mount are so often in the news dealing with the conflicts in the Middle East.

Dr. Caba serves as an adjunct professor at Kilns College here in Bend and has been published in a number of periodicals on religious and historical subjects. He received his PhD in philosophy and religion from Harrison Middleton University. Dr. Caba has completed volunteer archaeology work in Israel and has taught a number of classes on historical, philosophical, and religious topics over the years.

Pre-registration is not required for this lecture.

Facilitator: Thom Larson

Courses
Thursday, March 1 and 15, 11:45 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI Central Oregon member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

Tuesdays, March 6, 13 and 20, 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

The great theories of physics are like great works of art. And much like the greatest works of art, you don’t need to completely understand them in order to appreciate them. The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought. As you experience them, you will witness their progression toward ever-grander insights, pointing towards an as-yet-unfinished ultimate synthesis that will transform our understanding of the universe. Anyone, no matter what their training in science and mathematics, can appreciate this quest, which is nothing less than a search for the theory of everything.

There will be no need to get concerned with the mathematics since as Dr. Lincoln says, "We'll walk right up to the precipice of a full-blown calculation, but then we’ll step back before we get mired in the mathematical details." It’s a breathtaking trip, addressing such topics as:

  • Is the universe mathematical?
  • Feynman diagrams
  • Symmetry everywhere
  • Limitations of general relativity.

Preregistration is not required and all members are welcome to attend. Facilitators: Russ Hopper and Science Guys

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, January 9 to April 3, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager:

A 12-week Great Courses class taught by Professor Don Lincoln, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). "The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought." Pre-registration not required.

Wednesday, March 7, 14 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas—Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Wednesdays, January 3–April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

How did Eastern civilization-particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia-develop? Craig G. Benjamin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at Grand Valley State University states, "To truly understand the modern world, it is essential to know something about the many extraordinary contributions Eastern civilization has made."

Wednesdays, March 7 and 14, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

Back by popular demand, Ann Sargent returns for a third series of short stories in American Literature. The stories will be about issues that face our world today—war, equality, politics, humanity and culture. A variety of stories and authors will be featured through readings and discussion.

Ann is currently a writing instructor at Central Oregon Community College. She previously taught OLLI courses in American Literature at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.

Registration is required and the course is limited to 25 participants. Watch your email for the announcement. Participants will receive a reading list prior to the start of the course.

Study and Discussion Groups
Mondays, March 5 and 19, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

The March selection is Fantasy Land: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History by Kurt Andersen.

Facilitator: Rod Charny

If you wish to read ahead, here are the nonfiction books through May:

April 2 and 23: The Code Economy A Forty-Thousand Year History by Philip Auerswald
Facilitator: Kathryn Cullen

May 7 and 21: American Nations by Colin Woodward
Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: First and third Mondays of each month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Coordinator: Joyce Pickersgill

Our OLLI-CO nonfiction book group meets twice per month at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15–11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in January and February due to holidays).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. Each book is being facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome OLLI-CO members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

Monday, March 12, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Facilitator: Deb Hollens

If you wish to read ahead, here are the fiction books selected through May:

April 9: No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal (Deschutes Public Library "Novel Idea" Selection)
Facilitator: Michal Haller

May 14: City of Women by David R. Gilham
Facilitator: Robin Robinson

All members are welcome to attend Page-turners sessions.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Second Monday of each month, 10:15 a.m

Coordinator: Deb Hollens

Description of group.

Tuesdays, March 6, 13, and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Monday, March 19, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Fail Safe, (1 hr. 52 min., 1964) starring Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau, Dan O'Herlihy, Larry Hagman and Fritz Weaver.

Fail Safe is a film about what can happen when "fail safe" technology fails. It is a good reminder and extremely relevant in this increasingly technological age. One of the greatest anti-war thrillers ever, Fail Safe portrays a group of military men on the Verge of World War III. When a military computer error deploys a squadron of SAC bombers to destroy Moscow, the American President (Fonda) tries to call them back. But their sophisticated fail-safe system prevents him from aborting the attack, so he must convince the Soviets not to retaliate. In desperation, the President offers to sacrifice an American city if his pilots succeed in their deadly mission over Moscow. A four-star techno-thriller that builds tension and suspense with every tick of the nuclear clock.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Third Mondays of each month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

This monthly class is an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We share our individual perception of what the screenwriter and director are trying to convey to the audience, and how the film may relate to today’s world. Preregistration not required.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Thursday, March 1, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to Thursdays starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

 

April 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In April
Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Join us for an armchair tour of one of the great museum collections of European masterworks. You may have already visited the Louvre Museum, or perhaps you have included it on a list of future travel destinations. In either case, our spring art appreciation study group will build on your experiences or expand your travel dreams to include this remarkable cultural institution.

The nine-session study group opens with two lectures from "How to Look at and Understand Great Art." These lectures emphasize the fundamentals of viewing art to enhance the appreciation of the masterpieces of the Louvre we will view in subsequent sessions. The next six Thursdays involve watching and discussing lectures from The Great Courses "Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre." The last two sessions feature films about renowned artists whose work is part of the Louvre’s collection: Vincent Van Gogh (the 2017 animated film Loving Vincent), Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso (Matisse/Picasso: Twin Giants of Modern Art, 2009).

Preregistration is not required for this course; all members are welcome to attend!

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Group description.

Courses
Tuesday, April 3, 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager:

A 12-week Great Courses class taught by Professor Don Lincoln, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). "The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought." Pre-registration not required.

Tuesdays, April 10, 17, 24, 31, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

In another upcoming study group, we will examine music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion. This study group should be of interest to music lovers as well as those curious about the science behind how humans perceive sound, speech and music.

Over the course of nine sessions, we will look at the origins of rhythmic and musical expression. Topics include the physiological basis of our response to rhythmic beat, pitch, and timbre. We will also learn about musical cognition, and the neurological effects of listening to music.

Sessions will incorporate recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University whose research focuses on cognitive neuroscience of music. He is the author of Music, Language and the Brain (2010) and he has served as President of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. OLLI members may have seen him on the PBS documentary The Music Instinct: Science and Sound (2009).

This course does not require pre-registration and it is not necessary to attend every session.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Description of group.

Wednesday, April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Wednesdays, January 3–April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

How did Eastern civilization-particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia-develop? Craig G. Benjamin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at Grand Valley State University states, "To truly understand the modern world, it is essential to know something about the many extraordinary contributions Eastern civilization has made."

Wednesdays, April 11–June 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Join us as the Wednesday history study group embarks on a 12-week exploration into the history of Spain. OLLI member facilitators will lead sessions enhanced by recorded lectures by Professor Emerita Joyce E. Salisbury of the University of Wisconsin. We will delve into over 5000 years of history from the Neolithic period to the medieval, the Renaissance to Baroque, then on to the 20th century.

Topics include the peoples and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, the cross-cultural influences of Islamic, Judaic and Catholic traditions on the region, the development of the Spanish Empire, Spain’s exploration and colonial efforts in the Americas, and the literary and artistic contributions of Spanish artists throughout modern history.

Preregistration is required and started in March; call the main Academic Extension office to see if there is still space.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Study and Discussion Groups
Monday, April 2 and 23, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group, which meets twice per month in an informal setting, takes an unconventional look at history with its April selection, The Code Economy: A Forty-Thousand Year History, by Philip Auerswald.

Amazon says that the book "takes readers from the invention of the alphabet to the advent of the Blockchain…[and] argues that the advance of code is the key driver of human history."

Participants discuss whether the "advance of code has brought a shift in the structure of society that has challenged human beings to reinvent not only how we work but who we are," as the book description claims. Join this study group—without having to register—for what is sure to be an interesting and timely conversation.

Facilitator: Kathryn Cullen

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: First and third Mondays of each month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Coordinator: Joyce Pickersgill

Our OLLI-CO nonfiction book group meets twice per month at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15–11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in January and February due to holidays).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. Each book is being facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome OLLI-CO members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

Tuesdays, April 3, 10, 17, and 24, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Monday, April 9, 10:15 a.m.–noon

This dedicated group of fiction novel lovers meets every second Monday through May. In April, Page-turner participants discuss Lambda Literary Award-winning author Rakesh Satyal’s second novel, No One Can Pronounce My Name. This book is the 2018 Deschutes County Public Library’s "Novel Idea" selection. By participating in the "Novel Idea" program, our members are part of the largest community read program in the state of Oregon.

The library’s Communications and Development Manager Chantal Strobel says, "Satyal’s book explores the immigrant experience while using humor in a touching way to delve into a variety of issues. I think readers will appreciate the levity he brings to timely topics."

No One Can Pronounce My Name is set in a suburb Cleveland suburb, where a community of Indian Americans has settled. The novel follows the lives and experiences of Harit, a lonely Indian immigrant in his mid-forties who lives with his mother, and Ranjana, an Indian immigrant in her mid-forties, who has just sent her only child off to college.

After participating in this discussion, plan to attend the "Novel Idea" kickoff Saturday, April 14, at the Downtown Bend Library. The "event will be followed by three weeks of programs that explore and expound upon the themes and ideas" in this novel, culminating in a free presentation by the author on Sunday, May 6, 4:00 p.m. at Bend High School. (Information gleaned from the Deschutes Public Library website.)

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Second Monday of each month, 10:15 a.m

Coordinator: Michal Haller

Description of group.

Monday, April 16, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. Participants of Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film come together to share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience. Members also discuss how the film may relate to today's world. On the third Monday of April and May, we screen a movie and hold an engaging conversation about its elements.

April's film selection is The Manchurian Candidate (2 hr. 6 min., 1962). Wikipedia tells us this black and white neo-noir Cold War suspense thriller film is based on the 1959 Richard Condon novel by the same title. The film was directed by John Frankenheimer, and stars Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, and Janet Leigh; co-starring are Angela Lansbury, Henry Silva, and James Gregory. The Manchurian Candidate centers around Raymond Shaw, the son of a prominent political family, who becomes an unwitting assassin in an international communist conspiracy. Follow along as government officials from China and the Soviet Union follow Shaw around the world.

No pre-registration required.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Third Mondays of each month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

This monthly class is an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We share our individual perception of what the screenwriter and director are trying to convey to the audience, and how the film may relate to today’s world. Preregistration not required.

 

May 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In May
Wednesdays, May 2, 23, 30, 2:00–4:00 p.m. (The May 23 and 30 sessions were canceled.)

Erin W. Anderson-Griffith will introduce Linda Nochlin’s article, Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? (1971) and discuss the finer points of constraints on female artists.

From antiquity onward, only a small sample of women were recognized as some of the greatest artists. The women’s movement, with an emphasis on the advocacy of equal rights, helped to transform the traditionally male-centric social structures around the world. These shifts can be seen and felt in women artist’s explorations of mind and body, developing fluid and intimate subject matter. By examining this new sense of agency and confidence in this body of art, what issues have women artists chosen to address and are they effective?

Erin Anderson-Griffith has a BA and MA in Art History from Montana State University, where she was also an adjunct professor in the School of Art. She has significant experience with a number of renowned galleries.

Preregistration required; call Academic Extension to sign up.

Wednesday, May 9, 2:00–4:00 p.m. and Thursday, May 10, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Terrorism and irregular warfare have long been used to change political systems and acquire power; more recently, cultural schisms have led to a rise in terrorism carried out for religious and personal reasons. Religion, culture, ethnicity, and technology remain important elements of irregular warfare, defining how and why people take up arms. But the ultimate rationale for using these methods is to achieve political results–whether the users seek autonomy, control or power.

These two sessions provide an overview of what defines terrorism and related forms of conflict, and consider some of the most important thinkers on the subject, from Sun Tzu and Mao to Clausewitz and contemporary scholars. Case studies and examples of successful and unsuccessful uses of terror will be used throughout both sessions.

Anne McGee has a bachelor’s degree in linguistic analysis, master’s degrees in Business Administration, Airpower Art and Science, and Resourcing National Strategy. She is an MIT Seminar XXI Fellow, a graduate of the Joint Forces Staff College, and of the US Air Force Command and Staff College and has a Doctorate from Georgetown University. McGee’s career as a military strategist spans over thirty years, including service at many different levels within the Department of Defense. Preregistration required.

Lectures
Tuesday, May 15, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) collaboration made two historic announcements in February 2016. The first was that gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein 100 years earlier, had been definitively observed for the first time. The second was that those waves constituted the first observation of the merger of two distant black holes, indicating the power of this new way of observing the universe. Our presenter, member Larry Price, will highlight in accessible language the significance of gravitational waves to scientific understanding of the natural world and the immense technological achievement that resulted in their detection after 100 years of searching. He will also outline the power of this radically new method of observation and discuss the types of new discoveries about the universe that may result from it. Almost all past astronomy and cosmology has involved observations based on detecting electromagnetic radiation from the cosmos, whether light, radio waves, or x-rays. Now a method has been demonstrated that can detect gravitational events directly. The result will be, first, knowledge of previously undetectable processes in the universe, but then also the ability to correlate the observations we can already make with light with new information coming from gravitational waves.

Larry Price is a physicist specializing in elementary particles. He holds degrees in physics from Pomona College (BA) and Harvard University (MA and PhD). He retired from Argonne National Laboratory as a senior physicist and was Director of the High Energy Physics Division. Larry worked at Columbia University and the U.S. Department of Energy and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

Thursday, May 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Roger Sabbadini will present a compelling true story of Italian Jewish refugee Alessandro (Alex) Sabbadini, who escaped Fascist Italy to America on the eve of WWII only to join the fight in Italy with the U.S. 5th Army. He joined the fight for personal reasons–to liberate Italy and his Jewish family who were being pursued by the Fascists and the Nazis. The audience will appreciate this unusual aspect of history and its relevance to some of today’s immigration, xenophobia and other issues

Dr. Sabbadini is an Emeritus Professor at San Diego State University and Co-founder of SDSU˙s Institute for International Security and Conflict Resolution. Currently, he is a Senior Research Scholar at Stanford University School of Medicine. Sabbadini, the eldest son of the subject of this presentation, currently lives in Bend.

Courses
Tuesdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

In another upcoming study group, we will examine music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion. This study group should be of interest to music lovers as well as those curious about the science behind how humans perceive sound, speech and music.

Over the course of nine sessions, we will look at the origins of rhythmic and musical expression. Topics include the physiological basis of our response to rhythmic beat, pitch, and timbre. We will also learn about musical cognition, and the neurological effects of listening to music.

Sessions will incorporate recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University whose research focuses on cognitive neuroscience of music. He is the author of Music, Language and the Brain (2010) and he has served as President of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. OLLI members may have seen him on the PBS documentary The Music Instinct: Science and Sound (2009).

This course does not require pre-registration and it is not necessary to attend every session.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Join us as the Wednesday history study group embarks on a 12-week exploration into the history of Spain. OLLI member facilitators will lead sessions enhanced by recorded lectures by Professor Emerita Joyce E. Salisbury of the University of Wisconsin. We will delve into over 5000 years of history from the Neolithic period to the medieval, the Renaissance to Baroque, then on to the 20th century.

Topics include the peoples and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, the cross-cultural influences of Islamic, Judaic and Catholic traditions on the region, the development of the Spanish Empire, Spain’s exploration and colonial efforts in the Americas, and the literary and artistic contributions of Spanish artists throughout modern history.

Preregistration is required and started in March; call the main Academic Extension office to see if there is still space.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Thursdays, May 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Join us for an armchair tour of one of the great museum collections of European masterworks. You may have already visited the Louvre Museum, or perhaps you have included it on a list of future travel destinations. In either case, our spring art appreciation study group will build on your experiences or expand your travel dreams to include this remarkable cultural institution.

The nine-session study group opens with two lectures from "How to Look at and Understand Great Art." These lectures emphasize the fundamentals of viewing art to enhance the appreciation of the masterpieces of the Louvre we will view in subsequent sessions. The next six Thursdays involve watching and discussing lectures from The Great Courses "Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre." The last two sessions feature films about renowned artists whose work is part of the Louvre’s collection: Vincent Van Gogh (the 2017 animated film Loving Vincent), Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso (Matisse/Picasso: Twin Giants of Modern Art, 2009).

Preregistration is not required for this course; all members are welcome to attend!

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Study and Discussion Groups
Mondays, May 7 and 21, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group meets twice per month in an informal setting to examine and discuss a book of their choice. The May selection is American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America by Colin Woodward.

Amazon describes this book as an informative history of North America’s eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. According to journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations each with its own unique historical roots. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, which created regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since.

Participants examine the “revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future. From the Deep South to the Far West to Yankeedom to El Norte, Woodard reveals how each region continues to uphold its distinguishing ideals and identities today with results that can be seen in the composition of the U S Congress or on the county-by-county election maps of presidential elections. (Amazon)

Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

Tuesdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

About This Group

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Monday, May 15, 10:15 a.m.–noon

This dedicated group of fiction novel lovers meets the second Monday of the month. For May, Page-turner participants examine City of Women by David R. Gilham, set in 1943—the height of WWII.

The book's trade paperback edition introduces the book as follows: "With the men away at the front, Berlin has become a city of women.

On the surface, Sigrid Schröder is the model German soldier’s wife: She goes to work every day, does as much with her rations as she can, and dutifully cares for her meddling mother-in-law, all the while ignoring the horrific immoralities of the regime.

But behind this façade is an entirely different Sigrid, a woman of passion who dreams of her former Jewish lover, now lost in the chaos of the war."

Facilitator: Robin Robinson

Monday, May 21, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. Participants come together to share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

May's selection, Good Will Hunting (2 hrs. 6 min. 1997), is the story of a school janitor at M.I.T. who also happens to be a math genius with no formal education, but somehow demonstrates the natural skills required to solve the most complex of math problems. Starring and written by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck. Also starring Robin Williams. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Winner of two Oscars.

Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell

Requesting film suggestions for the 2018-19 season. Movies should be no more than 135 minutes long. Please send suggestions to gypsybonnie@gmail.com.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Thursday, May 4, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon is a fun, informal event for you to get to know each other! Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! Contact Barbara Jordan to let her know you can attend. We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Wednesday, May 23, 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Please plan to attend the second All-Member Meeting of the year. Council President Suzanne Butterfield will discuss and explain how we will begin to implement the OLLI-UO Financial Sustainability Plan. A light lunch will be provided.

 

June 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In June
Mondays, June 4 and 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required for either parts of this lecture.

Central Oregon member Jim Brown will present two lectures on his experiences and observations during the period of 2011 to 2015 while he and his wife lived in Istanbul, Turkey. Jim will discuss both Istanbul and modern Turkey. He will look at its geographic and historical context, incorporating his own experiences and observations of contemporary language and culture, Islam and its relation to culture and politics, and current political local and regional dynamics. Having lived in Istanbul for four years, Jim and his wife had many opportunities to experience the hospitality of the region, along with food and local customs.

There will be two sessions for this presentation. The first will focus on the geography and historical context of Istanbul. Being at the nexus of Europe and Asia, Istanbul has literally been a crossroads for centuries. Its major importance goes back to at least its founding by the Roman Emperor Constantine. With the fall to the Ottoman Turks in 1453, it became the center of the Ottoman Empire, lasting until the First World War. Jim will also explore the strategic importance of the Bosporus and the WWI history of Gallipoli. The first session will conclude with language and culture of Turkey. Jim will discuss why Ataturk is so prominent in 20th-century history.

The second session will be devoted to Islam and Turkish politics both domestic and international. The look at Islam will include the principles of Sunni Islam, Islamic holidays and the increasing implementation as the state’s religion in Turkey.

Political topics that Jim covers will sound familiar to anyone who follows any international news. He will look at the secular government of Mustafa Kamal and the ascendance of Tayyip Erdogan. The program will end with thoughts on political parties and the issues with the Kurds.

Thursdays, June 7 and 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required for either session.

OLLI members Bob Harrison and John Rhetts jointly narrate a series of photos John took in Egypt and Jordan in February 2018. This event will have two parallel themes:

Theme One—'armchair traveler'—Bob and John will present and discuss pictures of ancient pyramids, tombs, and temples at Giza, Memphis, and the Nile River. (Not a comprehensive history of ancient Egypt.) Bob especially will offer historical and cultural perspective for the pictures.

Theme Two—"strategies to enhance your travel photos"—John will present before and after pictures showing how he enhanced many scenes of Luxor, Edfu, Abu Simbel, Alexandria, Amman, Wadi Rum, and Petra. This will not be a 'how to' presentation; instead, it focuses only on 'what one can do'. If there is sufficient interest, a subsequent event teaching concretely 'how to' can be arranged.

Courses
Thursdays, June 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don’t make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people:

  • An average citizen-soldier of Greece marching into battle in the front row of a phalanx.
  • A Celtic monk scurrying away with the Book of Kells during a Viking invasion.
  • An Egyptian woman preparing her household before a social gathering.
  • A clergyman inside a Medieval monastery, worried about being deemed a heretic.
  • A member of Rome's plebian class struggling to survive in leaky, rat-infested housing.
  • A medieval woman with few options–to get married, become a nun, or turn to prostitution.

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Online Registration: The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit One, Egyptian Lives)

Tuesdays, June 5 and 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: The science course wraps up its final two sessions examining music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion, with recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University. We thank member Larry Weinberg for facilitating this course over the last two months.

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Larry Weinberg

Mondays, June 18, and 25, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: Sit back and enjoy stunning images that fill our day and night skies. This summer, our members have the opportunity to be informed of sky phenomena with our own local amateur astronomer, Jim Hammond. Dr. Hammond’s explanations will be supplemented by 12 sky-watching lectures featuring Professor Alex Filippenko, PhD of the University of California, Berkeley, from The Great Courses.

Each 45-minute lecture is full of stunning visuals, from photographs, telescopes, observatories, and detailed animations that break down scientific concepts. Dr. Filippenko will share his knowledge and wonder of such things as rainbows, dramatic cloud formations, sunsets, intricate constellations, captivating solar eclipses, and the distant planets themselves. Most of these can be observed with the naked eye or with a pair of binoculars. These processes can lead to a discussion of scientific processes such as cosmology, physics (including optics and electromagnetism), meteorology, and other atmospheric sciences.

Participants also receive information on the best times and places to see these objects, as well as simple equipment to improve what can be seen and the best times to view. At the end of the course, you will find yourself looking up and annoying your friends and family by explaining the science behind the beauty of the many phenomena seen every day in our sky.

Meets: Mondays, June 18–July 30, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Jim Hammond

Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: The Wednesday history course concludes its 12-week investigation into the history of Spain this month. The last four sessions are sure to be thrilling, incorporating topics such as pirates, religious wars, and the reign of Franco. Several OLLI members conducted research and led a class session or two. Thanks to all of you!

Meets: Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. (ends June 27)

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Study and Discussion Groups
Tuesdays, June 5, 12, 19, and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Thursday, June 7, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Reservations are required.

About This Course

Focus: Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Meets: First Thursday of each month, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m. at Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Contact: Barbara Jordan for reservations.

Friday, June 22, 7:15 a.m.–9:45 p.m.

Preregistration is required.

As the oldest art museum in the Pacific Northwest, the Portland Art Museum is home to Oregon’s most prestigious collection, including works from the European masters, Japanese screen prints and contemporary American pieces. There is also a sculpture garden, an area devoted to photography, and a Native American gallery, all of which are not to be missed.

We will have lunch before going to the museum, tour the museum until mid-afternoon, visit the nearby Portland Rose Garden or Japanese Garden, dinner in Gresham on the return. Estimated cost for museum and garden admissions, meals, and ride share is $75.

Pre-registration is required and is available online. Registration closes on June 18, 2018. Field trip waivers will also be required. The nonrefundable museum entrance fee of $15.99 per person will be collected at the time of registration.

Field Trip Coordinator: Gary Whiteaker