Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon 2018 Course and Activity Descriptions Archive

An archive of past courses and activities is listed below. Current course listings can be found on the Course and Activity Descriptions page.



January 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In January

China’s Silk Roads: A Wild West Adventure

Thursday, January 11, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Join OLLI-CO member Pat Ackley as she recounts her month-long adventure along China’s Silk Roads. Experiencing the incredible diversity of scenery and ethnic people along the way was a fulfilment of her own Marco Polo adventure fantasy.

Her 4,000-mile journey last May covered scorching deserts, soaring mountains, isolated villages, bustling new cities, awe-inspiring ancient ruins, and life-changing interactions with local people. Today, Western China is a divided country: Muslim Uyghurs and Han Chinese, with heavy security and police check-points throughout the region.

Pat's adventure started in the old imperial capital of Xian, with its Terra Cotta Warriors—a testimony to once-powerful ancient armies. Evidence of the spread of Buddhism can be seen in numerous archeological sites as well as at Labrang Monastery, home to the yellow-sect Tibetans. After a camel safari through the great Taklamakan Desert, her journey concludes on the border of the Pamir Mountain Range before visiting the Uyghur town of Kashgar and ending her tour in Urumqi.

"This trip was much more of a journey than a vacation,” she said. “Despite the early mornings, late nights, and great distances covered, it was the trip of a lifetime and it delivered everything I wanted . . . and more."

Pat is a retired educator and organization development consultant and has lived in Central Oregon for 25 years. She has a B.A. in education, M.S. in psychology, and Ed.D. in education administration. She serves on OLLI’s Governing Council and Program Committee and is responsible for the history programs.

Registration is required; call the OLLI-UO offices to see if there is space to attend.

Lectures

Bend-La Pine Schools: Top-Level Presentations

Monday, January 25, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

This is an exciting opportunity to hear some very special and high-level presentations about our Bend-La Pine schools has been organized and brought to us by The Bend-La Pine Schools Education Foundation Executive Director Michelle Johnson and President Wendy Graunitz. The Superintendent of Bend-La Pine schools has been asked to talk to us about the state of the District. In addition, the Technology Instructional Coach joins us with a demonstration of a Sphero robotic tool the Foundation has funded and is being used in several of our schools. The presentations are rounded out by a talk on what the Foundation does to bolster funding and innovation in the classrooms.

You can’t get this kind of multi-faceted presentation on our children's and grandchildren's schools—and the time to ask questions—anywhere else but OLLI.

Facilitator: Suzanne Butterfield

Courses

Foundations of Eastern Civilization—Korea and Japan

Wednesdays, January 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

Korea—MysteriousBeginnings; Korea—The Land of Morning Calm

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas–Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members

How to Look at and Understand Great Art

Wednesdays, January 3, 10, 24, and 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This class was last given at OLLI-CO in 2014 and was very popular.

Some of the lectures have been eliminated by the course managers to make this a 13-session class, ending February 14. Preregistration is NOT required. This class meets every Wednesday afternoon except for the third Wednesdays of the month.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Survey of Ancient Western Civilizations

Thursdays, January 4 and 18, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI-CO member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

The Theory of Everything: The Quest to Explain All Reality

Tuesdays, January 9, 16, 23, and 30, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Professor Don Lincoln, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). He is also a Guest Professor of High Energy Physics at the University of Notre Dame. He received his Ph.D. in Experimental Particle Physics from Rice University.

Dr. Lincoln’s research has been divided between Fermilab’s Tevatron Collider, until its close in 2011, and the CERN Large Hadron Collider, located outside Geneva, Switzerland.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Study and Discussion Groups

Page-turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, January 8, 10:15 a.m.–noon

The January selection is The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler.

Facilitator: Barbara Crislip

The February book selection is Summer by Edith Wharton.

Writers' Bloc

Tuesday, January 9 and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers’ Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, January 22 and 29, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

The Invention of Nature, by Andrea Wulf.

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

The February book selection is Kindly Inquisitors by Jonathan Rauch.

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, January 22, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Crash (1hr. 52 min. 2004), starring Don Cheadle, Sandra Bullock and Thandie Newton, is the film for January.

Set over a 36-hour period, this movie shows the intersection of Los Angelenos whose lives are diverse in race, gender, class, and economics. It demonstrates how our biases—some subtle, some not so—exhibit themselves, both in everyday life and when those lives come into contact with each other. The film is thought-provoking and pokes at our self-perceptions as it attempts to find a basic humanity in all of us. Paul Haggis, who also directed, won the Oscar for original screenplay; Crash won the Oscar for best picture.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

Intelligent Conversation Discussion Groups

Monday, January 29, 3:00–5:00 p.m.

The next "Intelligent Conversation" session will be held the final Monday in January, during which groups tackle the question, "Is healthcare a right?" Watch for an email announcing registration.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Luncheon at Moose Sisters

Tuesday, January 4, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to THURSDAYS starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

OLLI-UO Town Hall

Thursday, January 25, 10:30 a.m.–noon

In this special session, UO Vice President Roger Thompson will provide an overview of the division of Student Services and Enrollment Management and discuss the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon.

Members in Central Oregon will join Eugene/Springfield members for the session via videoconferencing. Vice President Thompson will also take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation.


February 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In February

The Creator Revolution and the New Digital Music Age

Thursday, February 8, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

"To those who want to make a living online doing something you love: In the beginning, you will put in thousands of hours of work, losing money and sleep doing it. If you really want to succeed, don’t have a plan B. There has never been a better time in the history of the creative industry to build a sustainable career."

Peter Hollens, son of OLLI Central Oregon member Deb Hollens, is an entrepreneur, educator, American pop singer and producer best known for his work on YouTube as an acapella cover artist. With more than 1.76 million subscribers, his videos have reached half of a billion views on Facebook and YouTube since 2011. Hollens’ knowledge of the digital entertainment industry combined with a passion for his art, have allowed his new educational platform, the Hollens Creator Academy, to develop a meaningful and unique video course structure with the ability to teach musicians and creators how to make a living doing what they love. It prepares artists to begin pursuing their professional goals, create a personal brand, and build an online community while creating their art.

Peter has collaborated and performed with several outstanding artists, including Brian Wilson, Jason Mraz, Hunter Hayes, Gladys Knight, David Archuleta, Lindsey Stirling, Jackie Evancho, and The Piano Guys. He has released more than 160 digital singles to date and continues to release new music every other week. He has been involved with a cappella music since 1999 when he co-founded the University of Oregon’s all-male A Cappella group, On the Rocks. Preregistration is not required.

Societal Issues in Literature

Wednesdays, February 28, March 7 and 14, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

Back by popular demand, Ann Sargent returns for a third series of short stories in American Literature. The stories will be about issues that face our world today—war, equality, politics, humanity and culture. A variety of stories and authors will be featured through readings and discussion.

Ann is currently a writing instructor at Central Oregon Community College. She previously taught OLLI courses in American Literature at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.

Registration is required and the course is limited to 25 participants. Watch your email for the announcement. Participants will receive a reading list prior to the start of the course.

Lectures

Custer Abandoned

Monday, February 5, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

Join OLLI-UO member Fred Gientke as he discusses his new book, Custer Abandoned. The presentation discusses General Crook’s defeat at the Battle of the Rosebud and its impact on Custer’s defeat a week later at the Little Big Horn. The book is a unique study with an untold perspective about the Little Big Horn Battle and Custer’s highly-criticized strategy and defeat. For the first time a book has been written and devoted to make an indisputable case that General Custer should not be blamed for the destruction of himself and part of his regiment—that blame rests upon the shoulders of an American brigadier general. The Indians killed Custer, but Custer’s death was undeniably caused by the neglect and disappearance of a brigadier general who abandoned the campaign at its height and neglectfully retreated to the Big Horn Mountains to fish and hunt while waiting for long-delayed reinforcements.

Fred will project annotated maps and recent colored photos that illustrate the campaign trails, Indian village ambush sites, battle sites and more.

To bring Custer Abandoned to life, Fred devoted 12 years to research and traveled over 20,000 miles retracing the campaign trails. Preregistration is not required.

Courses

Anthropology and the Study of Humanity

Thursdays, February 1 , 8, 15, and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

This 12-week session class is built around a 2017 Great Courses DVD series featuring Professor Scott M. Lacy of Fairfield University.

Professor Lacy offers an introduction to academic anthropology and its four subfields: biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and sociocultural anthropology. Over the course of 24 lectures, we learn how anthropology furthers our understanding of our world and ourselves. Specifically, we see how anthropologists deploy multidisciplinary methods to trace the origins of our species as well as the development of religion, agriculture, money, language, and many other pillars of the modern human experience.

Unit 1, our journey begins with biological anthropology to address the question: Who are we, and where do we come from? Specifically, we explore the origins of humanity, primatology, the spread of humankind, and a re-articulation of the concept of race.

Unit 2, we move to the question of our status as the sole remaining survivors of a long line of upright walking apes. In particular, we bring in archaeology and linguistics to work out how Homo sapiens outlived all the other branches of our extended family tree. This exploration reveals how tools, agriculture, cities, money, and language all contributed to the survival of our species.

Unit 3, we turn to cultural anthropology to explore why people and cultures are so diverse despite our singularity as a species. We’ll review the history and methods of cultural anthropology and see differences in the way people throughout the world practice and understand core pieces of humanity, including family, marriage, gender, sexuality, religion, and artistic expression.

Unit 4, we’ll apply all four subfields to see how an interdisciplinary approach helps us understand and resolve human problems. We’ll see anthropologists in action, examining conflict, forensics, health, economic development, ecology, and even the nature of happiness.

In sum, we will discover that anthropology digs deep into the geographic, temporal, and biological diversity of humankind to help us understand our remarkable diversity as a species. And ironically, the deeper we dig, the more we reveal the oneness of the human race.

OLLI Central Oregon members Pat Ackley, Bonnie Campbell, and Maggie Machala facilitate this course. Pre-registration is required and started mid-January. Call the office to see if there is still space.

Survey of Ancient Western Civilizations

Thursday, February 1 and 15, 1:30—3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI-CO member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

The Theory of Everything

Tuesdays, February 6, 13, 20, and 27, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

The great theories of physics are like great works of art. And much like the greatest works of art, you don’t need to completely understand them in order to appreciate them. The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought. As you experience them, you will witness their progression toward ever-grander insights, pointing towards an as-yet-unfinished ultimate synthesis that will transform our understanding of the universe. Anyone, no matter what their training in science and mathematics, can appreciate this quest, which is nothing less than a search for the theory of everything.

There will be no need to get concerned with the mathematics since as Dr. Lincoln says, "We'll walk right up to the precipice of a full-blown calculation, but then we’ll step back before we get mired in the mathematical details." It’s a breathtaking trip, addressing such topics as:

  • Is the universe mathematical?
  • Feynman diagrams
  • Symmetry everywhere
  • Limitations of general relativity.

Preregistration is not required and all members are welcome to attend. Facilitators: Russ Hopper and Science Guys

Foundations of Eastern Civilization—Korea and Japan

Wednesdays, February 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas—Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

How to Look at and Understand Great Art

Wednesdays, February 7 and 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This class was last given at OLLI Central Oregon in 2014 and was very popular.

Some of the lectures have been eliminated by the course managers to make this a 13-session class, ending February 14. Preregistration is NOT required. This class meets every Wednesday afternoon except for the third Wednesdays of the month.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, February 5 and 26, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group meets at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in February).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. The books listed below are those the group selected for January through May 2018. Each session is facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

The February selection is Kindly Inquisitions by Jonathan Rauch.

Facilitator: Steve Hussey

If you wish to read ahead, here are the nonfiction books selected through May:

March 5 and 19: Fantasy Land by Kurt Anderson
Facilitator: Rod Charny

April 2 and 16: The Code Economy by Philip Auerswald
Facilitator: Kathy McCullen

May 7 and 21: American Nations by Colin Woodward
Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, February 6, 13, 20, and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

Page-turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, February 12, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Summer by Edith Wharton.

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

If you wish to read ahead, here are the upcoming selections:

March: Plainsong by Kent Haruf
Facilitator: Deb Hollens

April: No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal (Deschutes Public Library Novel Idea Selection)
Facilitator: Michal Haller

May: City of Women by David R. Gilham
Facilitator: Robin Robinson

All members are welcome to attend Page-turners as well.

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, February 12, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

A Street Cat Named Bob (1hr. 43 min. 2016), starring Luke Treadaway, Ruta Gedmintas, Joanne Froggatt, Anthony Head

Based on a true story, James Bowen is a homeless man and former heroin addict living on the streets of London, and down to his last bits of change. Bob is a stray cat looking for somewhere warm to sleep. When James and Bob meet, they forge a never-to-be-forgotten friendship.

Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon at Moose Sisters

Thursday, February 1, 11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to THURSDAYS starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

OLLI-UO Central Oregon All-Member Meeting

Wednesday, February 21, 11:45–1:00 p.m.

Bring a brown bag lunch or enjoy some snacks provided by our Hospitality Committee and participate in the first all-member meeting with our newly-elected 2018 Governing Council. President Suzanne Butterfield, along with other Council officers, will inform members of the implementation status of the Sustainability Plans at both sites, other 2018 plans, and will invite your input during this crucial time for OLLI Central Oregon.


March 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In March

Anthropology and the Study of Humanity

Thursday, March 1 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

We're pleased to announce a new 12-week Great Courses program presented by Professor Scott M. Lacy, Ph.D. Fairfield University. As a field of study, anthropology covers a lot of ground,from the language of primates to bones found in a desert to modern-day warzones. A survey of the field encompasses elements of history, biology,archaeology, linguistics, sociology, and cultural studies. It also involvesdata analyses, population modeling, urban development, economics, medicine,forensics, sexuality, art, and much, much more. Anything and everything thatrelates to humanity, anthropology approaches, demonstrating the common threadsacross world cultures and revealing the underlying connections that unite usall.

The course will befacilitated by OLLI Central Oregon members Pat Ackley, Bonnie Campbell, and Maggie Machala.

Preregistration is required and started mid-January.

Lectures

Archaeology at the Jerusalem Temple Mount

Thursday, March 8, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Mike Caba worked on an archaeological project in Jerusalem dealing with the Temple Mount. Come and hear a talk on the background of the Temple Mount and the reasons that Jerusalem and the Temple Mount are so often in the news dealing with the conflicts in the Middle East.

Dr. Caba serves as an adjunct professor at Kilns College here in Bend and has been published in a number of periodicals on religious and historical subjects. He received his PhD in philosophy and religion from Harrison Middleton University. Dr. Caba has completed volunteer archaeology work in Israel and has taught a number of classes on historical, philosophical, and religious topics over the years.

Pre-registration is not required for this lecture.

Facilitator: Thom Larson

Courses

Survey of Ancient Western Civilizations

Thursday, March 1 and 15, 11:45 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Heads up history fans! OLLI Central Oregon member and popular history professor Bob Harrison presents a 10-session survey of earliest societies in the evolution of western civilizations. The course covers ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt through the Greco-Roman and Byzantine periods (3500 BC-1100 AD).

These sessions will be held the first and third Thursdays, October 5–February 15. Members are asked to register once for all sessions.

Bob Harrison, OLLI Central Oregon member, taught history at Southern Oregon University and COCC, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Imperial Russia, Atlantis and Alexander the Great.

The Theory of Everything

Tuesdays, March 6, 13 and 20, 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

The great theories of physics are like great works of art. And much like the greatest works of art, you don’t need to completely understand them in order to appreciate them. The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought. As you experience them, you will witness their progression toward ever-grander insights, pointing towards an as-yet-unfinished ultimate synthesis that will transform our understanding of the universe. Anyone, no matter what their training in science and mathematics, can appreciate this quest, which is nothing less than a search for the theory of everything.

There will be no need to get concerned with the mathematics since as Dr. Lincoln says, "We'll walk right up to the precipice of a full-blown calculation, but then we’ll step back before we get mired in the mathematical details." It’s a breathtaking trip, addressing such topics as:

  • Is the universe mathematical?
  • Feynman diagrams
  • Symmetry everywhere
  • Limitations of general relativity.

Preregistration is not required and all members are welcome to attend. Facilitators: Russ Hopper and Science Guys

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, January 9 to April 3, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager:

A 12-week Great Courses class taught by Professor Don Lincoln, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). "The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought." Pre-registration not required.

Foundations of Eastern Civilization—Korea and Japan

Wednesday, March 7, 14 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

How did Eastern civilization—particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia—develop? What do we know about the history, politics, governments, art, science, and technology of these countries? And how does the story of Eastern civilization play out in today’s world of business, politics, and international exchange?

We begin fall term’s exploration in China with a consideration of the diverse geography of this, the third-largest nation on earth. We follow the evolution of the Chinese dynasties and their political and philosophical ideas—Confucianism, Daoism, and Legalism—and also look at the Silk Roads that led to extraordinary levels of cultural exchange.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Wednesdays, January 3–April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

How did Eastern civilization-particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia-develop? Craig G. Benjamin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at Grand Valley State University states, "To truly understand the modern world, it is essential to know something about the many extraordinary contributions Eastern civilization has made."

Societal Issues in Literature

Wednesdays, March 7 and 14, 1:00–2:30 p.m.

Back by popular demand, Ann Sargent returns for a third series of short stories in American Literature. The stories will be about issues that face our world today—war, equality, politics, humanity and culture. A variety of stories and authors will be featured through readings and discussion.

Ann is currently a writing instructor at Central Oregon Community College. She previously taught OLLI courses in American Literature at Bradley University in Peoria, Illinois.

Registration is required and the course is limited to 25 participants. Watch your email for the announcement. Participants will receive a reading list prior to the start of the course.

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, March 5 and 19, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

The March selection is Fantasy Land: How America Went Haywire: A 500-Year History by Kurt Andersen.

Facilitator: Rod Charny

If you wish to read ahead, here are the nonfiction books through May:

April 2 and 23: The Code Economy A Forty-Thousand Year History by Philip Auerswald
Facilitator: Kathryn Cullen

May 7 and 21: American Nations by Colin Woodward
Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: First and third Mondays of each month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Coordinator: Joyce Pickersgill

Our OLLI-CO nonfiction book group meets twice per month at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15–11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in January and February due to holidays).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. Each book is being facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome OLLI-CO members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

Page-turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, March 12, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Plainsong by Kent Haruf

Facilitator: Deb Hollens

If you wish to read ahead, here are the fiction books selected through May:

April 9: No One Can Pronounce My Name by Rakesh Satyal (Deschutes Public Library "Novel Idea" Selection)
Facilitator: Michal Haller

May 14: City of Women by David R. Gilham
Facilitator: Robin Robinson

All members are welcome to attend Page-turners sessions.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Second Monday of each month, 10:15 a.m

Coordinator: Deb Hollens

Description of group.

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, March 6, 13, and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, March 19, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Fail Safe, (1 hr. 52 min., 1964) starring Henry Fonda, Walter Matthau, Dan O'Herlihy, Larry Hagman and Fritz Weaver.

Fail Safe is a film about what can happen when "fail safe" technology fails. It is a good reminder and extremely relevant in this increasingly technological age. One of the greatest anti-war thrillers ever, Fail Safe portrays a group of military men on the Verge of World War III. When a military computer error deploys a squadron of SAC bombers to destroy Moscow, the American President (Fonda) tries to call them back. But their sophisticated fail-safe system prevents him from aborting the attack, so he must convince the Soviets not to retaliate. In desperation, the President offers to sacrifice an American city if his pilots succeed in their deadly mission over Moscow. A four-star techno-thriller that builds tension and suspense with every tick of the nuclear clock.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Third Mondays of each month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

This monthly class is an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We share our individual perception of what the screenwriter and director are trying to convey to the audience, and how the film may relate to today’s world. Preregistration not required.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon at Moose Sisters

Thursday, March 1, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon moves to Thursdays starting in October. Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701


April 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In April

Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre and movies about famous artists

Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Join us for an armchair tour of one of the great museum collections of European masterworks. You may have already visited the Louvre Museum, or perhaps you have included it on a list of future travel destinations. In either case, our spring art appreciation study group will build on your experiences or expand your travel dreams to include this remarkable cultural institution.

The nine-session study group opens with two lectures from "How to Look at and Understand Great Art." These lectures emphasize the fundamentals of viewing art to enhance the appreciation of the masterpieces of the Louvre we will view in subsequent sessions. The next six Thursdays involve watching and discussing lectures from The Great Courses "Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre." The last two sessions feature films about renowned artists whose work is part of the Louvre’s collection: Vincent Van Gogh (the 2017 animated film Loving Vincent), Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso (Matisse/Picasso: Twin Giants of Modern Art, 2009).

Preregistration is not required for this course; all members are welcome to attend!

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Group description.

Courses

The Theory of Everything

Tuesday, April 3, 1:45 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager:

A 12-week Great Courses class taught by Professor Don Lincoln, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). "The unifying theories of physics are among the greatest and most complex in all of science; they stand as incomparable masterpieces in the gallery of modern thought." Pre-registration not required.

Music and the Brain

Tuesdays, April 10, 17, 24, 31, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

In another upcoming study group, we will examine music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion. This study group should be of interest to music lovers as well as those curious about the science behind how humans perceive sound, speech and music.

Over the course of nine sessions, we will look at the origins of rhythmic and musical expression. Topics include the physiological basis of our response to rhythmic beat, pitch, and timbre. We will also learn about musical cognition, and the neurological effects of listening to music.

Sessions will incorporate recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University whose research focuses on cognitive neuroscience of music. He is the author of Music, Language and the Brain (2010) and he has served as President of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. OLLI members may have seen him on the PBS documentary The Music Instinct: Science and Sound (2009).

This course does not require pre-registration and it is not necessary to attend every session.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Description of group.

Foundations of Eastern Civilization—Korea and Japan

Wednesday, April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Wednesdays, January 3–April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley, will facilitate the sessions along with other Central Oregon members.

How did Eastern civilization-particularly that of China, Korea, Japan, and the nations of Southeast Asia-develop? Craig G. Benjamin, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History at Grand Valley State University states, "To truly understand the modern world, it is essential to know something about the many extraordinary contributions Eastern civilization has made."

The History of Spain: Land on a Crossroad

Wednesdays, April 11–June 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Join us as the Wednesday history study group embarks on a 12-week exploration into the history of Spain. OLLI member facilitators will lead sessions enhanced by recorded lectures by Professor Emerita Joyce E. Salisbury of the University of Wisconsin. We will delve into over 5000 years of history from the Neolithic period to the medieval, the Renaissance to Baroque, then on to the 20th century.

Topics include the peoples and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, the cross-cultural influences of Islamic, Judaic and Catholic traditions on the region, the development of the Spanish Empire, Spain’s exploration and colonial efforts in the Americas, and the literary and artistic contributions of Spanish artists throughout modern history.

Preregistration is required and started in March; call the main Academic Extension office to see if there is still space.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Monday, April 2 and 23, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group, which meets twice per month in an informal setting, takes an unconventional look at history with its April selection, The Code Economy: A Forty-Thousand Year History, by Philip Auerswald.

Amazon says that the book "takes readers from the invention of the alphabet to the advent of the Blockchain…[and] argues that the advance of code is the key driver of human history."

Participants discuss whether the "advance of code has brought a shift in the structure of society that has challenged human beings to reinvent not only how we work but who we are," as the book description claims. Join this study group—without having to register—for what is sure to be an interesting and timely conversation.

Facilitator: Kathryn Cullen

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: First and third Mondays of each month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Coordinator: Joyce Pickersgill

Our OLLI-CO nonfiction book group meets twice per month at the UO Bend Center on the first and third Mondays of each month from 10:15–11:45 a.m. (with date exceptions in January and February due to holidays).

Participating members suggest and vote on selected titles for a term. Each book is being facilitated by a different person within the group. We welcome OLLI-CO members to join us in an amusing and occasionally controversial but good-natured discussion. Preregistration is not required.

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, April 3, 10, 17, and 24, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Page-turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, April 9, 10:15 a.m.–noon

This dedicated group of fiction novel lovers meets every second Monday through May. In April, Page-turner participants discuss Lambda Literary Award-winning author Rakesh Satyal’s second novel, No One Can Pronounce My Name. This book is the 2018 Deschutes County Public Library’s "Novel Idea" selection. By participating in the "Novel Idea" program, our members are part of the largest community read program in the state of Oregon.

The library’s Communications and Development Manager Chantal Strobel says, "Satyal’s book explores the immigrant experience while using humor in a touching way to delve into a variety of issues. I think readers will appreciate the levity he brings to timely topics."

No One Can Pronounce My Name is set in a suburb Cleveland suburb, where a community of Indian Americans has settled. The novel follows the lives and experiences of Harit, a lonely Indian immigrant in his mid-forties who lives with his mother, and Ranjana, an Indian immigrant in her mid-forties, who has just sent her only child off to college.

After participating in this discussion, plan to attend the "Novel Idea" kickoff Saturday, April 14, at the Downtown Bend Library. The "event will be followed by three weeks of programs that explore and expound upon the themes and ideas" in this novel, culminating in a free presentation by the author on Sunday, May 6, 4:00 p.m. at Bend High School. (Information gleaned from the Deschutes Public Library website.)

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Second Monday of each month, 10:15 a.m

Coordinator: Michal Haller

Description of group.

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, April 16, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. Participants of Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film come together to share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience. Members also discuss how the film may relate to today's world. On the third Monday of April and May, we screen a movie and hold an engaging conversation about its elements.

April's film selection is The Manchurian Candidate (2 hr. 6 min., 1962). Wikipedia tells us this black and white neo-noir Cold War suspense thriller film is based on the 1959 Richard Condon novel by the same title. The film was directed by John Frankenheimer, and stars Frank Sinatra, Laurence Harvey, and Janet Leigh; co-starring are Angela Lansbury, Henry Silva, and James Gregory. The Manchurian Candidate centers around Raymond Shaw, the son of a prominent political family, who becomes an unwitting assassin in an international communist conspiracy. Follow along as government officials from China and the Soviet Union follow Shaw around the world.

No pre-registration required.

About This Course

Focus:

Meets: Third Mondays of each month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Linda and Rod Charny

This monthly class is an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We share our individual perception of what the screenwriter and director are trying to convey to the audience, and how the film may relate to today’s world. Preregistration not required.

May 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In May

Who Are All the Great Women Artists? A look at female artists from 1500 to today.

Wednesdays, May 2, 23, 30, 2:00–4:00 p.m. (The May 23 and 30 sessions were canceled.)

Erin W. Anderson-Griffith will introduce Linda Nochlin’s article, Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? (1971) and discuss the finer points of constraints on female artists.

From antiquity onward, only a small sample of women were recognized as some of the greatest artists. The women’s movement, with an emphasis on the advocacy of equal rights, helped to transform the traditionally male-centric social structures around the world. These shifts can be seen and felt in women artist’s explorations of mind and body, developing fluid and intimate subject matter. By examining this new sense of agency and confidence in this body of art, what issues have women artists chosen to address and are they effective?

Erin Anderson-Griffith has a BA and MA in Art History from Montana State University, where she was also an adjunct professor in the School of Art. She has significant experience with a number of renowned galleries.

Preregistration required; call Academic Extension to sign up.

Terrorism: Strategy and Theory

Wednesday, May 9, 2:00–4:00 p.m. and Thursday, May 10, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Terrorism and irregular warfare have long been used to change political systems and acquire power; more recently, cultural schisms have led to a rise in terrorism carried out for religious and personal reasons. Religion, culture, ethnicity, and technology remain important elements of irregular warfare, defining how and why people take up arms. But the ultimate rationale for using these methods is to achieve political results–whether the users seek autonomy, control or power.

These two sessions provide an overview of what defines terrorism and related forms of conflict, and consider some of the most important thinkers on the subject, from Sun Tzu and Mao to Clausewitz and contemporary scholars. Case studies and examples of successful and unsuccessful uses of terror will be used throughout both sessions.

Anne McGee has a bachelor’s degree in linguistic analysis, master’s degrees in Business Administration, Airpower Art and Science, and Resourcing National Strategy. She is an MIT Seminar XXI Fellow, a graduate of the Joint Forces Staff College, and of the US Air Force Command and Staff College and has a Doctorate from Georgetown University. McGee’s career as a military strategist spans over thirty years, including service at many different levels within the Department of Defense. Preregistration required.

Lectures

Gravitational Waves and The Dawn of a New Astronomy

Tuesday, May 15, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

The LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) collaboration made two historic announcements in February 2016. The first was that gravitational waves, predicted by Einstein 100 years earlier, had been definitively observed for the first time. The second was that those waves constituted the first observation of the merger of two distant black holes, indicating the power of this new way of observing the universe. Our presenter, member Larry Price, will highlight in accessible language the significance of gravitational waves to scientific understanding of the natural world and the immense technological achievement that resulted in their detection after 100 years of searching. He will also outline the power of this radically new method of observation and discuss the types of new discoveries about the universe that may result from it. Almost all past astronomy and cosmology has involved observations based on detecting electromagnetic radiation from the cosmos, whether light, radio waves, or x-rays. Now a method has been demonstrated that can detect gravitational events directly. The result will be, first, knowledge of previously undetectable processes in the universe, but then also the ability to correlate the observations we can already make with light with new information coming from gravitational waves.

Larry Price is a physicist specializing in elementary particles. He holds degrees in physics from Pomona College (BA) and Harvard University (MA and PhD). He retired from Argonne National Laboratory as a senior physicist and was Director of the High Energy Physics Division. Larry worked at Columbia University and the U.S. Department of Energy and is a Fellow of the American Physical Society.

An Italian Jewish Soldier’s Fight to Save His Family from Fascism

Thursday, May 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Roger Sabbadini will present a compelling true story of Italian Jewish refugee Alessandro (Alex) Sabbadini, who escaped Fascist Italy to America on the eve of WWII only to join the fight in Italy with the U.S. 5th Army. He joined the fight for personal reasons–to liberate Italy and his Jewish family who were being pursued by the Fascists and the Nazis. The audience will appreciate this unusual aspect of history and its relevance to some of today’s immigration, xenophobia and other issues

Dr. Sabbadini is an Emeritus Professor at San Diego State University and Co-founder of SDSU˙s Institute for International Security and Conflict Resolution. Currently, he is a Senior Research Scholar at Stanford University School of Medicine. Sabbadini, the eldest son of the subject of this presentation, currently lives in Bend.

Courses

Music and the Brain

Tuesdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

In another upcoming study group, we will examine music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion. This study group should be of interest to music lovers as well as those curious about the science behind how humans perceive sound, speech and music.

Over the course of nine sessions, we will look at the origins of rhythmic and musical expression. Topics include the physiological basis of our response to rhythmic beat, pitch, and timbre. We will also learn about musical cognition, and the neurological effects of listening to music.

Sessions will incorporate recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University whose research focuses on cognitive neuroscience of music. He is the author of Music, Language and the Brain (2010) and he has served as President of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition. OLLI members may have seen him on the PBS documentary The Music Instinct: Science and Sound (2009).

This course does not require pre-registration and it is not necessary to attend every session.

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

The History of Spain: Land on a Crossroad

Wednesdays, May 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Join us as the Wednesday history study group embarks on a 12-week exploration into the history of Spain. OLLI member facilitators will lead sessions enhanced by recorded lectures by Professor Emerita Joyce E. Salisbury of the University of Wisconsin. We will delve into over 5000 years of history from the Neolithic period to the medieval, the Renaissance to Baroque, then on to the 20th century.

Topics include the peoples and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, the cross-cultural influences of Islamic, Judaic and Catholic traditions on the region, the development of the Spanish Empire, Spain’s exploration and colonial efforts in the Americas, and the literary and artistic contributions of Spanish artists throughout modern history.

Preregistration is required and started in March; call the main Academic Extension office to see if there is still space.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre and movies about famous artists

Thursdays, May 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Join us for an armchair tour of one of the great museum collections of European masterworks. You may have already visited the Louvre Museum, or perhaps you have included it on a list of future travel destinations. In either case, our spring art appreciation study group will build on your experiences or expand your travel dreams to include this remarkable cultural institution.

The nine-session study group opens with two lectures from "How to Look at and Understand Great Art." These lectures emphasize the fundamentals of viewing art to enhance the appreciation of the masterpieces of the Louvre we will view in subsequent sessions. The next six Thursdays involve watching and discussing lectures from The Great Courses "Museum Masterpieces: The Louvre." The last two sessions feature films about renowned artists whose work is part of the Louvre’s collection: Vincent Van Gogh (the 2017 animated film Loving Vincent), Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso (Matisse/Picasso: Twin Giants of Modern Art, 2009).

Preregistration is not required for this course; all members are welcome to attend!

About This Group

Focus:

Meets: Thursdays, April 5–May 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, May 7 and 21, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Our nonfiction book group meets twice per month in an informal setting to examine and discuss a book of their choice. The May selection is American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America by Colin Woodward.

Amazon describes this book as an informative history of North America’s eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. According to journalist and historian Colin Woodard, North America is made up of eleven distinct nations each with its own unique historical roots. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, which created regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since.

Participants examine the “revolutionary and revelatory take on American identity and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and continue to mold our future. From the Deep South to the Far West to Yankeedom to El Norte, Woodard reveals how each region continues to uphold its distinguishing ideals and identities today with results that can be seen in the composition of the U S Congress or on the county-by-county election maps of presidential elections. (Amazon)

Facilitator: Dottie Blalock

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Writers' Bloc meets every week at its new time: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. at the UO Bend Center. Carolyn Hammond continues as Course Manager; any members are welcome to attend.

About This Group

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Coordinator: Carolyn Hammond

Description of group.

Page-turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, May 15, 10:15 a.m.–noon

This dedicated group of fiction novel lovers meets the second Monday of the month. For May, Page-turner participants examine City of Women by David R. Gilham, set in 1943—the height of WWII.

The book's trade paperback edition introduces the book as follows: "With the men away at the front, Berlin has become a city of women.

On the surface, Sigrid Schröder is the model German soldier’s wife: She goes to work every day, does as much with her rations as she can, and dutifully cares for her meddling mother-in-law, all the while ignoring the horrific immoralities of the regime.

But behind this façade is an entirely different Sigrid, a woman of passion who dreams of her former Jewish lover, now lost in the chaos of the war."

Facilitator: Robin Robinson

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, May 21, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. Participants come together to share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

May's selection, Good Will Hunting (2 hrs. 6 min. 1997), is the story of a school janitor at M.I.T. who also happens to be a math genius with no formal education, but somehow demonstrates the natural skills required to solve the most complex of math problems. Starring and written by Matt Damon and Ben Affleck. Also starring Robin Williams. Directed by Gus Van Sant. Winner of two Oscars.

Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell

Requesting film suggestions for the 2018-19 season. Movies should be no more than 135 minutes long. Please send suggestions to gypsybonnie@gmail.com.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon at Moose Sisters

Thursday, May 4, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Our monthly social luncheon is a fun, informal event for you to get to know each other! Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village.

Make your reservation early; space is limited! Contact Barbara Jordan to let her know you can attend. We hope to see you there!

Location: Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

All-Member Meeting

Wednesday, May 23, 11:45 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Please plan to attend the second All-Member Meeting of the year. Council President Suzanne Butterfield will discuss and explain how we will begin to implement the OLLI-UO Financial Sustainability Plan. A light lunch will be provided.


June 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In June

West Meets East in Istanbul and Modern Turkey

Mondays, June 4 and 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required for either parts of this lecture.

Central Oregon member Jim Brown will present two lectures on his experiences and observations during the period of 2011 to 2015 while he and his wife lived in Istanbul, Turkey. Jim will discuss both Istanbul and modern Turkey. He will look at its geographic and historical context, incorporating his own experiences and observations of contemporary language and culture, Islam and its relation to culture and politics, and current political local and regional dynamics. Having lived in Istanbul for four years, Jim and his wife had many opportunities to experience the hospitality of the region, along with food and local customs.

There will be two sessions for this presentation. The first will focus on the geography and historical context of Istanbul. Being at the nexus of Europe and Asia, Istanbul has literally been a crossroads for centuries. Its major importance goes back to at least its founding by the Roman Emperor Constantine. With the fall to the Ottoman Turks in 1453, it became the center of the Ottoman Empire, lasting until the First World War. Jim will also explore the strategic importance of the Bosporus and the WWI history of Gallipoli. The first session will conclude with language and culture of Turkey. Jim will discuss why Ataturk is so prominent in 20th-century history.

The second session will be devoted to Islam and Turkish politics both domestic and international. The look at Islam will include the principles of Sunni Islam, Islamic holidays and the increasing implementation as the state’s religion in Turkey.

Political topics that Jim covers will sound familiar to anyone who follows any international news. He will look at the secular government of Mustafa Kamal and the ascendance of Tayyip Erdogan. The program will end with thoughts on political parties and the issues with the Kurds.

Egypt and Jordan: Images and History

Thursdays, June 7 and 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required for either session.

OLLI members Bob Harrison and John Rhetts jointly narrate a series of photos John took in Egypt and Jordan in February 2018. This event will have two parallel themes:

Theme One—'armchair traveler'—Bob and John will present and discuss pictures of ancient pyramids, tombs, and temples at Giza, Memphis, and the Nile River. (Not a comprehensive history of ancient Egypt.) Bob especially will offer historical and cultural perspective for the pictures.

Theme Two—"strategies to enhance your travel photos"—John will present before and after pictures showing how he enhanced many scenes of Luxor, Edfu, Abu Simbel, Alexandria, Amman, Wadi Rum, and Petra. This will not be a 'how to' presentation; instead, it focuses only on 'what one can do'. If there is sufficient interest, a subsequent event teaching concretely 'how to' can be arranged.

Courses

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit One: Egyptian Lives)

Thursdays, June 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don’t make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people:

  • An average citizen-soldier of Greece marching into battle in the front row of a phalanx.
  • A Celtic monk scurrying away with the Book of Kells during a Viking invasion.
  • An Egyptian woman preparing her household before a social gathering.
  • A clergyman inside a Medieval monastery, worried about being deemed a heretic.
  • A member of Rome's plebian class struggling to survive in leaky, rat-infested housing.
  • A medieval woman with few options–to get married, become a nun, or turn to prostitution.

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Online Registration: The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit One, Egyptian Lives)

Music and the Brain

Tuesdays, June 5 and 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: The science course wraps up its final two sessions examining music as an integral part of human nature and society through viewing, listening, and discussion, with recorded lectures by Professor Aniruddh Patel, a professor of psychology from Tufts University. We thank member Larry Weinberg for facilitating this course over the last two months.

Meets: Tuesdays, April 10–June 12, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Larry Weinberg

Skywatching: Seeing and Understanding Cosmic Wonders

Mondays, June 18, and 25, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: Sit back and enjoy stunning images that fill our day and night skies. This summer, our members have the opportunity to be informed of sky phenomena with our own local amateur astronomer, Jim Hammond. Dr. Hammond’s explanations will be supplemented by 12 sky-watching lectures featuring Professor Alex Filippenko, PhD of the University of California, Berkeley, from The Great Courses.

Each 45-minute lecture is full of stunning visuals, from photographs, telescopes, observatories, and detailed animations that break down scientific concepts. Dr. Filippenko will share his knowledge and wonder of such things as rainbows, dramatic cloud formations, sunsets, intricate constellations, captivating solar eclipses, and the distant planets themselves. Most of these can be observed with the naked eye or with a pair of binoculars. These processes can lead to a discussion of scientific processes such as cosmology, physics (including optics and electromagnetism), meteorology, and other atmospheric sciences.

Participants also receive information on the best times and places to see these objects, as well as simple equipment to improve what can be seen and the best times to view. At the end of the course, you will find yourself looking up and annoying your friends and family by explaining the science behind the beauty of the many phenomena seen every day in our sky.

Meets: Mondays, June 18–July 30, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Jim Hammond

The History of Spain: Land on a Crossroad

Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: The Wednesday history course concludes its 12-week investigation into the history of Spain this month. The last four sessions are sure to be thrilling, incorporating topics such as pirates, religious wars, and the reign of Franco. Several OLLI members conducted research and led a class session or two. Thanks to all of you!

Meets: Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. (ends June 27)

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Study and Discussion Groups

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, June 5, 12, 19, and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon at Moose Sisters

Thursday, June 7, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Reservations are required.

About This Course

Focus: Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! The group now meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Make your reservation early; space is limited! We hope to see you there!

Meets: First Thursday of each month, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m. at Moose Sisters, 63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Contact: Barbara Jordan for reservations.

Day Trip: Portland Art Museum

Friday, June 22, 7:15 a.m.–9:45 p.m.

Preregistration is required.

As the oldest art museum in the Pacific Northwest, the Portland Art Museum is home to Oregon’s most prestigious collection, including works from the European masters, Japanese screen prints and contemporary American pieces. There is also a sculpture garden, an area devoted to photography, and a Native American gallery, all of which are not to be missed.

We will have lunch before going to the museum, tour the museum until mid-afternoon, visit the nearby Portland Rose Garden or Japanese Garden, dinner in Gresham on the return. Estimated cost for museum and garden admissions, meals, and ride share is $75.

Pre-registration is required and is available online. Registration closes on June 18, 2018. Field trip waivers will also be required. The nonrefundable museum entrance fee of $15.99 per person will be collected at the time of registration.

Field Trip Coordinator: Gary Whiteaker


July/August 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured This Summer

Mule Deer at Risk and the Urgent Need for Wildlife Crossings: What the Public Can Do

Wednesday, July 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Central Oregon OLLI member Suzanne Linford (whom you may know as "Susie") leads this presentation examining Protect Animal Migration (PAM), a citizen's advocacy group in Bend, whose mission is to educate the community on the growing problem of mule deer, elk, and other wildlife in Central Oregon, particularly along the historic Highway 97 migration corridor. Protect Animal Migration works with the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Forest Service for the Deschutes National Forest. PAM supports these departments in community outreach and education on issues like the high number of animal/vehicle fatalities in Deschutes County (1,000-5,000 per year).

Susie co-founded Protect Animal Migration in 2007 and earned a Master Naturalist Certification from OSU. She has been a volunteer Interpreter in Wildlife and Social History at the High Desert Museum for eight years.

Sara Gregory, Wildlife Habitat Biologist with the Oregon Department of Wildlife, will share her expertise in the ecology of the local mule deer population, their migratory patterns, shrinking habitats, and other information relating to the critical need for habitat connectivity.

Cidney Bowman, Wildlife Biologist and Wildlife Crossings Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Transportation, will moderate a short film on migrations and wildlife crossings. She will provide an update on the status of Oregon in providing wildlife connectivity and answer any questions surrounding this issue.

Addressing Maternal Mortality in Rural Zambia: A Peace Corps Volunteer's Experience

Monday, August 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Each day, 800 women die around the world of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Over half of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan African countries such as Zambia. The majority of these maternal deaths are preventable. Join OLLI member Maggi Machala as she shares her first-hand experience living and working in Zambia to help address this devastating health issue.

During Maggi’s presentation, members learn about Zambia's geography, climate, history, people, and culture. She describes the health and the health care system in Zambia and about the Saving Mothers Giving Life (SMGL) initiative that is striving to improve maternal mortality. Members also hear about what it was like to live as a Peace Corps volunteer in Zambia and the challenges and successes working in SMGL projects.

Maggi Machala, MPH, RN, worked for 40 years in maternal-child health. She served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia in 1978–80 and more recently in Zambia in 2015–16.

Courses

OLLI Summer Documentaries

Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A great lineup of summer documentaries kicks off the second Wednesday of July, featuring topics as varied as sports to honeybees! We’ve set aside a bit more time to allow for discussion after viewing each film.

Meets: Wednesdays, July 11–September 5, 9:30 a.m.–noon

Film Schedule:

July 11: Cuba and the Cameraman (2017) 114 min. This film looks at 45 years of an American’s visits to Cuba through the lens of video. It’s as much a look at the people of Cuba as Cuba’s history. Facilitator: Pat Ackley

July 18: Where to Invade Next (2016) 120 min. Michael Moore advises the Joint Chiefs of Staff that, in order to make America great again, he will invade only Caucasian countries and bring back their best ideas to America. This film will make you stop and think about America’s social policies. Facilitator: Terry Schwab

July 25: The Tower (2016) 82 min. The gunfire spree by the sniper in the University of Texas Tower on August 1, 1966, is largely remembered as the beginning of our country’s far too commonplace mass shootings. This highly praised film tells the story of that day using only the words of those who were there. Facilitator: Linda Charny

August 1: Icarus (2017) 121 min. Winner of this year's Oscar for Best Documentary, Icarus is a compelling combination of sports and geopolitics, following the investigation into Russian doping scandals.

August 8: For the Love of Music: The Club 47 Folk Revival (2014) 105 min. This documentary explores the folk music revival of the ‘60’s in Cambridge, Massachusetts, including interviews with Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Maria Muldaur, Jackie Washington, and more. Facilitator: Rod Charny

August 15: More Than Honey (2012) 95 min. Bees all over the world are in crisis. This film takes an investigative look at honeybee colonies in California, Switzerland, China and Australia and the phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder. Facilitator: Russ Hopper

August 22: Big Men (2013) 100 min. Big Men follows the trail of oil money beginning with the initial discovery of oil off the coast of West Africa. It compares Nigeria and Ghana’s experiences with accepting financing from a U.S. company, the negotiations involved, the ultimate winners and losers, and the consequences for each country. Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

August 29: Fathers of the Sport (2008) 80 min. This chronicle of the history and commercialization of the game of basketball explores how some urban playground basketball players of yesterday were able to overcome racism and poverty through a genuine devotion to the game. These legendary players transformed the NBA forever.

September 5: Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) 120 min. Dawson City is just below the Arctic Circle in Canada and was the jumping off place for the 1896 Gold Rush. It was connected to the outside world in the early 1900’s by cinema. In the late 1970’s, a construction crew unearthed a surprising find: 533 reels of nitrate film long thought to be forever lost. Facilitator: Sharon Dawn

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit Two: Greek Lives)

Thursdays, July 12, and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.
Thursdays, August 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people:

  • An average citizen-soldier of Greece marching into battle in the front row of a phalanx.
  • A Celtic monk scurrying away with the Book of Kells during a Viking invasion.
  • An Egyptian woman preparing her household before a social gathering.
  • A clergyman inside a Medieval monastery, worried about being deemed a heretic.
  • A member of Rome's plebian class struggling to survive in leaky, rat-infested housing.
  • A medieval woman with few options–to get married, become a nun, or turn to prostitution.

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

East Meets West: An Introductory Course in Taoist Philosophy

Thursdays, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Focus: Taoist Grand Master Franklin Wood introduces us to Taoism, an ancient teaching that is one of the three major underlying philosophical influences in Chinese thought and culture, along with Confucianism and Buddhism. Tao can be roughly translated into English as “path” or “the way.” Franklin leads us through a history of Taoism and its application in the Western world, including a discussion of the convergence of Eastern mysticism and the scientific method. Examine Taoist masters such as Lao Tzu and Confucius. Come and join us for six lectures about this ancient teaching of peaceful and contemplative concepts.

Registration is required for this course.

Assigned reading for registrants:

  • Tao Te Ching by Lao Tsu (New translation by GIA-Fu Feng and Jane English) ISBN 0-394-71833-X (New translation by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English)
  • Inner Chapters by Chuan Tsu (Translation by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English) ISBN 0-394-71990-1

Meets: Thursdays, July 26–August 30, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Presenter: Franklin Wood

Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science

Tuesdays, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course Manager and our own science guru Russ Hopper takes us on a six-week expedition in the study of human behavior. Russ’s explanations will be supplemented by a series of Great Courses programs featuring Dr. Robert Sapolsky. Together, they seek to understand our humanity, “the very essence of who we are and how we live our lives.” Using evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, psychology and other fields, Dr. Sapolsky examines all kinds of quirky human behavior. Why do we have bad moods? Why do we have strange dreams? Dr. Sapolsky uses many of his own case studies to illuminate human behavior including junk-food monkeys, mind-controlling parasites, and replacing love with technology (Great Courses). This thought-provoking program will get you thinking about your own complex and intriguing human nature.

Dr. Sapolsky has been the recipient of a MacArthur "genius" fellowship, and Stanford University's Bing Award for Teaching Excellence.

Meets: Tuesdays, August 7–September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Study and Discussion Groups

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

EXPERIENCE OLLI!

Thursday, July 19, 9:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m. or 1:15–3:15 p.m.
https://osher.uoregon.edu/experience_olli

Experience OLLI—where we offer short classes to the public to give those who attend an opportunity to see what we are all about! Two repeated sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, provide your non-OLLI friends a sample of our great programs. We have seating for 50 at each session, so we have plenty of room! Information cards are available for distribution. Please encourage your friends to join our special event and learn what our wonderful organization is all about!

Annual OLLI All-Member Summer Picnic!

Sunday, August 19, noon–2:00 p.m.

Location: Ponderosa Park

Preregistration is required.

Summer is finally here and that means it's time to break out your flip flops and shorts! It's also time to make plans for the All-Member Summer Picnic! This year, we will be celebrating OLLI Central Oregon's 15th anniversary. We are planning a number of fabulous activities and you won't want to miss out!

More details and registration will be coming soon. Mark your calendars now!

Looking Ahead

Victorian England

Wednesdays, September 12, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About this Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley coalesces fellow OLLI members to facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria's reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions from the Great Courses program "Victorian England," taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; a class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12, 2018–January 30, 2019, 9:30–11:30 a.m.


September 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In September

Without Warning: The Attack on the Athenia and the Start of WWII

Thursday September 6, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Thomas C. Sanger is author of a new historical novel, Without Warning, based on the German torpedoing of the British passenger ship Athenia at the start of World War II. His grandmother survived the attack and wrote a journal based on her experiences. As a journalist and writer, Tom was inspired to write the book after finding his grandmother's journal. He conducted five years of research at archives and libraries in Great Britain, Germany, Canada and the United States, as well as interviewed survivors and their descendants.

“I chose to write the book as historical fiction because I wanted to explore the emotions of the characters and involve readers on a more personal level with the story,” Sanger said. In researching the book, he interviewed five survivors of the sinking, which claimed 30 Americans among the 112 who were killed.

Sanger, a native of Los Angeles, worked for the Associated Press and radio station KABC, as well as wrote documentary scripts for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Sydney, Australia. He also enjoyed a lengthy career in corporate communications in Southern California. Without Warning is his third book but his first work of fiction.

Preregistration is not required.

Immigration and Refugees—The Intersection of Politics and Human Rights in the U.S.

Friday, September 21, 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Riverbend Community Room, Bend Parks and Recreation District Office

Join us for a timely and provocative presentation of issues confronting the U.S. and countries around the world by one of the leading experts on the subject, Lisa LeSage. Learn about the development of refugee law, and global approaches to migration, which provide a context for the current raging debate over immigration in the United States. This presentation provides an introduction to international refugee law and international human rights norms, their relationship to U.S. immigration policies and practices, and the myths and realities surrounding migration. We also look at how policies play out in real time, and implications for current national and local challenges in the United States, including family separation, unaccompanied minors and human trafficking.

Lisa LeSage is the Executive Director of Immigration Counseling Service (ICS), serving immigrants, unaccompanied minors, and trafficking victims. Prior to joining ICS, she spent five years in the Middle East as Morocco Country Director and Senior Legal Advisor in Istanbul, Turkey for the American Bar Association Initiative working on human rights, rule of law, and refugee issues throughout the Middle East and North Africa.

During her career, Lisa has worked with lawyers, judges, ministries of justice, prosecutors, law faculties, bar associations, human rights clinics and human rights organizations in a number of countries in the Middle East, Europe and in Central and South America. She has authored several articles, and has lectured nationally and internationally.

Lisa received her B.A. from University of Portland, her J.D. from Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College, and a Master’s in Law (L.L.M.) in Human Rights Law from the University of London.

This is a special lecture open to the public. Please invite guests to attend; no preregistration required.

Courses

Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science

Tuesdays through September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course Manager and our own science guru Russ Hopper takes us on a six-week expedition in the study of human behavior. Russ’s explanations will be supplemented by a series of Great Courses programs featuring Dr. Robert Sapolsky. Together, they seek to understand our humanity, “the very essence of who we are and how we live our lives.” Using evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, psychology and other fields, Dr. Sapolsky examines all kinds of quirky human behavior. Why do we have bad moods? Why do we have strange dreams? Dr. Sapolsky uses many of his own case studies to illuminate human behavior including junk-food monkeys, mind-controlling parasites, and replacing love with technology (Great Courses). This thought-provoking program will get you thinking about your own complex and intriguing human nature.

Dr. Sapolsky has been the recipient of a MacArthur “genius” fellowship, and Stanford University’s Bing Award for Teaching Excellence.

Topics

  • August 7: What’s So Special About Being Human?; Junk-Food Monkeys
  • August 14: The Burden of Being Burden-Free; Bugs in the Brain
  • August 21: Poverty’s Remains; Why Are Dreams Dreamlike?
  • August 28: The Pleasures and Pains of “Maybe”; How the Other Half Heals
  • September 4: Why We Want the Bodies Back; Anatomy of a Bad Mood
  • September 11: This Is Your Brain on Metaphors; Sushi and Middle Age

Meets: Tuesdays, August 7–September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays starting September 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Join Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent. We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics

  • September 18: Mineralogy and a New View of Earth; Origin and Evolution of the Early Universe
  • September 25: Origins of the Elements—Nucleosynthesis; Ur-Minerals, First Crystals in the Cosmos

Meets: Tuesdays, September 18–December 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Victorian Britain

Wednesdays starting September 12, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “Victorian Britain,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics

  • September 12: The Victorian Paradox; Victoria’s Early Reign—1837–1861
    Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • September 26: The Industrial Revolution—1750–1830; Railways and Steamships
    Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • October 3: Parliamentary Reform and Chartism; The Upper- and Middle-Class Woman
    Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • October 10: The Working-Class Woman; The State Church and Evangelical Revival
    Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • October 17: The Oxford Movement and Catholicism; Work and Working-Class Life
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • October 24: Poverty & the “Hungry Forties”; Ireland, Famine, & Robert Peel
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • October 31: Scotland and Wales; Progress and Optimism
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 2019, 10:00 a.m.–noon

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit Three: Roman Lives)

Thursdays, September 6, 13, 20, and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.
Thursdays, October 4, 11, and 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people.

Unit 3 Topics:

  • September 6: Being Roman; Being a Roman Slave
    Facilitator: Craig Jorgensen
  • September 13: Being a Roman Soldier; Being a Roman Woman
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • September 20: Being a Poor Roman; Being a Rich Roman
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • September 27: Being a Roman Celebrity; Being a Roman Criminal
    Facilitator: David Costello
  • October 4: Relaxing Roman Style; Practicing Roman Religion
    Facilitator: TBD
  • October 11: Being Jewish Under Roman Rule; Being Christian Under Roman Rule
    Facilitator: Thom Larsen
  • October 18: Being a Celt in Ancient Britain; Being a Roman Briton
    Facilitator: Maggi Machala

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Masterworks of American Art

Thursdays starting September 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course managers Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield lead us through a sweeping survey of the brilliant paintings of American homegrown masters in 24 lectures over 12 separate sessions. These extraordinary artists document the birth of our nation from its colonial roots up to the brink of World War I and the birth of Modernism. As we examine this vital artistic tradition in its historical, cultural, and political contexts, we discover how the appreciation of the legacy of American art is crucial to understanding the story of our great nation.

A nation's identity is expressed through its art. Great painters capture the essence of a culture's brightest hopes, deepest anxieties, and most profound aspirations.

Our journey is supplemented by the lectures of Professor William Kloss, noted art historian revealing the vital and vibrant tradition of American art. Witness the birth, growth, and development of our great nation as it was painted by some of the greatest artists the world has known. (The Great Courses)

Topics

  • September 13: Art in the New World; 18th-Century Colonial Art
  • September 20: The Genius of Copley and C.W. Peale; A Revolution in Art
  • September 27: Portraiture in Federal America; Early Historical and Landscape Painting

Meets: Thursdays, September 13–December 20, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Study and Discussion Groups

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, September 10, 10:15 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Participants discuss The Great Alone by Kristan Hannah, award-winning author of The Nightingale. Returning POW Ernt Allbright is traumatized by his service and captivity in Vietnam. He impulsively moves his wife, Cora, and daughter, Leni, to a remote area of Alaska to escape his demons and live “off the grid.” Ernt explodes into accelerating abusive behavior towards his family who must find a way to survive both the terrors of the Alaskan winter and Ernt’s rapidly deteriorating mental condition. An epic story that showcases the rugged sweep of the Alaskan wilderness, The Great Alone is an exciting read!

Meets: second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Facilitator: Michal Haller

October's selection: Bend in the River by V.S. Naipaul

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, September 17 and 24, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

For September, the group examines New York Times Book Review “Editor’s Choice” American Wolf by Nate Blakeslee, the story of the reintroduction of wolves in the lower 48 states after their near extinction in the 1920's. American Wolf is a tale not only of a single wolf and her pack's struggle to survive, but also a story of the confrontation between conservationists and a generation’s old way of life. Since there are several wolf packs in Oregon and nearby states, as well as ranchers and farmers, the story is especially relevant for us today.

Meets: first and third Monday of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Facilitators: Rod and Linda Charny

October's selection: The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money by Bryan Caplan

Final Summer Documentary

Wednesday, September 5, 9:30 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) 120 min.

Dawson City, just below the Arctic Circle in Canada, was the jumping off place for the 1896 Gold Rush. It was connected to the outside world in the early 1900s by cinema. In the late 1970s, a construction crew unearthed a surprising find: 533 reels of nitrate film long thought to be forever lost.

Facilitator: Sharon Dawn

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, September 17, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 1 hour 40 minutes

Cast: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Edward Norton

Between the world wars, Gustave H, the concierge at a prestigious European hotel, takes a bellboy named Zero as a trusted protégé. Meanwhile, the upscale guests are involved in an art theft and a dispute over a vast family fortune. This is a comedy with subtle political overtones set in the beautiful mountains of Europe.

Meets: Third Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Bonnie Campbell and Elizabeth Farwell

Intelligent Conversation: Stereotypes Based on Skin Color

Mondays, September 24 and October 22, 3:00–5:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Nearly a year ago, OLLI-UO Central Oregon began hosting an irregular series of events offering members an opportunity for focused discussion in an atmosphere conducive to civil and safe conversation, encouraging the expression of diverse opinions. This series was given the title: Intelligent Conversation. We have found that 10-person groups are an optimal size for this sort of discussion, and have therefore limited registration to two groups of 10 accordingly.

Topic: Our first Intelligent Conversation for fall continues the theme of social divides that impact discussion and decision-making in America. The current focus is on what is commonly termed racism. This is a complicated and fraught term, especially as there is no established scientific (genetic or biologic) basis for the various distinctions attributed to the term race. Different people reference many and various aspects of persons when they use race, making wide differences in meaning more or less inevitable, invisible and confusing to coherent discussion. For the purposes of our next two meetings, we want to confine racism to refer to "stereotypes based on skin color." This may seem a bit arbitrary or restrictive, but what we are trying to do is to have for everyone a clear definition of our subject when attempting to have intelligent conversation together.

The goal for this Intelligent Conversation event is to stimulate a discussion of two sets of questions about stereotypes based on skin color in two consecutive meetings. The questions will be divided by session, namely:

  • The first session on September 24 addresses questions like:
    • "What stereotypes [positive and negative] do I hold regarding people of varying/different from 'my' skin color?"
    • "How do I know this/these about myself?"
    • "How am I aware of acting on these towards individuals I encounter, read, or hear about?"
  • The second session on October 22 deals with:
    • "How do I try to restrain or contain myself from making negative judgments about persons with different-from-my skin color?"
    • "How successful am I?"
    • "How can I tell?"

In deciding to register, please plan to attend both dates. Members who register for this two-meeting event will be emailed and expected to listen to a short audio-interview in preparation for the first meeting.

Meets: fourth Monday of September and October, 3:00–5:00 p.m.

Moderators: John Rhetts, Max Merrill, Linda Redeker, Russ Hopper


October 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In October

Legendary Locals of Bend

Monday, October 1, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Longtime Bend resident Les Joslin shares the stories of a fascinating mix of local legends who could be characterized as “the right people, in the right place, at the right time” who arrived in Central Oregon during the past century and a half to make Bend the fascinating town it has become. Some of these people, like John Charles Fremont and Ashton Eaton, gained national prominence and even global stature. Others were and are more ordinary people who have done and continue to do extraordinary things in an extraordinary place.

Les Joslin is a retired US Navy commander; former US Forest Service firefighter, wilderness ranger, and staff officer; and former Central Oregon Community College and Oregon State University instructor. He has been a resident of Bend for three decades, has served as president of the board of directors for the Deschutes County Historical Society, and is a fellow of the High Desert Museum. He is the author of several books and articles, including Legendary Locals of Bend.

Preregistration is not required.

Who Are All the Great Women Artists? (Part II)

Wednesdays, October 3 and 10, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Art historian Erin W. Anderson returns with two lectures drawing from Linda Nochlin’s essay, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” She presents the old-world view of the “Great Masters” of art, which has largely excluded women, and explores what have historically been the roles of women in art. The series begins with little known Renaissance artists and subjects and ends with some contemporary women artists and how they use the female body in an effort to reveal the unique roles of women in art.

Anderson worked as an art historian at Sotheby’s Institute of Art in London, the Pace galleries in New York, and Montana State University as an adjunct instructor. She worked and studied in southern Italy at the Villas of Oplontis from 2010–2014 with the Oplontis Project, conducting a systematic, multidisciplinary study. Anderson has an upcoming article in the third volume of the Oplontis Project publication.

Please choose the button above to register. The assigned reading may be accessed within the course description as well.

Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome: The Painful Consequences of Exposure to Combat

Monday, October 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Join Central Oregon OLLI-UO member and Vietnam combat veteran Craig Jorgensen, along with two other combat veterans and PTSD professionals, for a timely examination of the very unique history, social impacts, symptoms, and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in combat veterans.

You probably know someone whose life is affected by post-traumatic stress disorder. PTSD is a condition that develops in some people who have experienced a shocking, frightening, or dangerous event.

It is natural to feel afraid during and after a traumatic situation. Fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to help defend against danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response protects a person from harm. Nearly everyone will experience a range of reactions after trauma, yet most people recover from initial symptoms naturally. In moderate to severe trauma, the symptoms can be many, varied, and even cause permanent change to the brain itself. Those who continue to experience problems may be diagnosed with PTSD.

For many veterans, the return from military service can include coping with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. There are 24,000 veterans in Central Oregon, including approximately 2,000 combat veterans, but the number of people affected by PTSD is multiplied many times by the family and friends of those veterans suffering from the condition. There is a VA regional hospital in Portland, a Veterans Administration clinic in Bend, and—since 2010—a “Vet Center,” also in Bend that provides treatment to 250 combat veterans and veterans of sexual trauma through individual and group therapy.

Panel members include our own Craig Jorgensen, retired psychotherapist, Lutheran pastor, and USMC Vietnam combat veteran; Amanda Juza-Hamrick, Director of the Vet Center, Licensed Clinical Social worker, Army veteran, and veteran of the war in Iraq; and Roger Riolo, Master Trainer with the National Association for Interpretation, retired airline pilot, Air Force AC47 gunship pilot and Vietnam veteran.

Registration is not required.

Lessons from the Fosbury Flop

Monday October 29, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Fifty years ago this fall, Oregon State University’s Dick Fosbury revolutionized the world of high-jumping when he won a gold medal in Mexico City as the first backward-over the bar competitor. Now, every jumper in the world uses the "Fosbury Flop." What are the four life lessons we can learn from Fosbury? What part did former University of Oregon track and field coach Bill Bowerman play in the Fosbury Story?

Bob Welch, former adjunct professor of journalism at the UO, columnist at The Register-Guard, and author of the just released The Wizard of Foz: Dick Fosbury's One-Man High-Jump Revolution, answers these questions and more in an enlightening look at an athlete like no other.

Welch, the author of over 20 books, has been called "the most eclectic writer in America,"" having written trail books, WWII books, and children’s books. A 1972 graduate of the University of Oregon, he began his career as sports editor of The Bulletin in Bend. He’s twice won first place in the National Society of Newspaper Columnists contest and twice won the Oregon Newspaper Publisher Association’s "best writing" award. His book American Nightingale, about the first nurse to die after the landings at Normandy, was an Oregon Book Award finalist featured on ABC’s Good Morning America.

Courses

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent. We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics:

  • October 2: Presolar Dust Grains—Chemistry Begins; Coming to Grips with Deep Time
    Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • October 9: The Birth of the Solar System; The Early Solar System—Terrestrial Planets
    Facilitator: John Rhetts
  • October 16: Hints from the Gas Giants and Their Moons; Meteorites—The Oldest Objects You Can Hold Facilitator: Norman Frater
  • October 23: Mineral Evolution, Go! Chondrite Meteorites; Meteorite Types and Planetesimals
    Facilitator: Russ Hopper
  • October 30: Achondrites and Geochemical Affinities; The Accretion and Differentiation of Earth
    Facilitator: John Dulzo
  • November 6: How Did the Moon Form?; The Big Thwack! Facilitator: Alexa Dellinger
  • November 13: The “Big Six” Elements of Early Earth; The Black Earth—Peridotite to Basalt; Origins of the Oceans Facilitator: Russ Hopper
  • November 20: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving Break)

Meets: Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Victorian Britain

Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “Victorian England,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics:

  • October 3: Parliamentary Reform and Chartism; The Upper- and Middle-Class Woman.
    Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • October 10: The Working-Class Woman; The State Church and Evangelical Revival.
    Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • October 17: The Oxford Movement and Catholicism; Work and Working-Class Life.
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • October 24: Poverty and the “Hungry Forties”; Ireland, Famine, and Robert Peel.
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • October 31: Scotland and Wales; Progress and Optimism.
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • November 7: China and the Opium War; The Crimean War 1854–1856.
    Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • November 14: The Indian Mutiny 1857; Victorian Britain and American Civil War.
    Facilitator: Bob Harrison

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit Three: Roman Lives)

Thursdays, October 4, 11, and 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people.

Unit 3 Topics:

  • September 6: Being Roman; Being a Roman Slave.
    Facilitator: Craig Jorgensen
  • September 13: Being a Roman Soldier; Being a Roman Woman.
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • September 20: Being a Poor Roman; Being a Rich Roman.
    Facilitator: Joe Stevens
  • September 27: Being a Roman Celebrity; Being a Roman Criminal.
    Facilitator: David Costello
  • October 4: Relaxing Roman Style; Practicing Roman Religion.
    Facilitator: TBD
  • October 11: Being Jewish Under Roman Rule; Being Christian Under Roman Rule.
    Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • October 18: Being a Celt in Ancient Britain; Being a Roman Briton.
    Facilitator: Maggi Machala

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Masterworks of American Art

Thursdays September 13–December 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course managers Suzanne Butterfield and Burt Litman lead us through a sweeping survey of the brilliant paintings of American homegrown masters in 24 lectures over 12 separate sessions. These extraordinary artists document the birth of our nation from its colonial roots up to the brink of World War I and the birth of Modernism. As we examine this vital artistic tradition in its historical, cultural, and political contexts, we discover how the appreciation of the legacy of American art is crucial to understanding the story of our great nation.

A nation's identity is expressed through its art. Great painters capture the essence of a culture's brightest hopes, deepest anxieties, and most profound aspirations.

Our journey is supplemented by the lectures of Professor William Kloss, noted art historian revealing the vital and vibrant tradition of American art. Witness the birth, growth, and development of our great nation as it was painted by some of the greatest artists the world has known. (The Great Courses)

Topics:

  • October 4: 1820s–Art in the Era of Good Feelings; Thomas Cole and the American Landscape
  • October 11: Thomas Cole–The Late Years; Other Views, Other Visions
  • October 18: American Genre Painting; Native Americans and Westward Expansion
  • November 1: The Civil War in Art; The Glow of Peace
  • November 8: Art–The Mirror of Social Change; 1876–1893—The Civic Revival of the Nation
  • November 15: 1885–1900—Contrasts of Dark and Light; Americans Abroad—Expatriate Painters

Meets: Thursdays, September 13–December 20, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Study and Discussion Groups

Writers' Bloc

Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond. Gerry Sharp will be facilitating the group for the month of October.

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, October 1 and 15, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

This month, the group discusses The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money by Bryan Caplan.

Beginning with Nobel Prize winners Kenneth Arrow and Michael Spence in the 1970s, economists proposed that people with more years of education earn more not merely because of the skills and knowledge they accumulated during their time in school (“human capital”) but largely as a function of the information their degree signals to employers. The Case Against Education by George Mason University economist Bryan Caplan looks at a synthesis of the research in favor of the signaling model of education. Caplan makes the empirical claim that only a fraction of the extra wages that graduates earn can be explained by skills and knowledge as in the human capital model of education. He argues that much of what we observe about educational behavior and earnings is consistent with signaling our intelligence, hard work, and persistence rather than particular skills used in our job.

(from the review by Noam Stein in Quillette)

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

Course Manager: Joyce Pickersgill

Meets: first and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

November's selection: Why Does The World Exist? by Jim Holt

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, October 8, 10:15 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Our dedicated group of fiction lovers meets the second Monday of the month, this time to examine Bend in the River by V.S. Naipaul, winner of the Nobel Prize for literature. Naipaul takes us deeply into the life of one man—Salim, an Indian Muslim, an outsider, who has come to live in an unnamed, newly-independent central African country in a settlement at the bend of a river. Naipaul gives us a dark and disturbing vision of postcolonial Africa, a place caught up in the modern world, yet threatened by violence and chaos as the new president consolidates power. Bend in the River has a place on several lists of the best fiction of the 20th Century, including those of the Guardian, Modern Library, and The New York Times.

Meets: second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

Course Manager: Deb Hollens

November's selection: Eventide by Kent Haruf

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, October 15, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

Topic: Our Man in Havana (1959) 2 hours 51 minutes

Cast: Alec Guiness, Noel Coward, Burl Ives, Ernie Kovacs

Directed by Carol Reed adapted from a spy comedy written by Graham Greene, Our Man in Havana was filmed in Cuba with Castro’s permission just prior to Cuba’s relationship with Russia. Jim Wormold is an English vacuum cleaner salesman in Cuba right before the revolution. British intelligence recruits him as a spy, but Jim knows nothing about espionage. He invents reports on a Cuban revolution from public documents, hires imaginary agents, and “discovers” blueprints of secret weapons that are actually vacuum cleaners.

Meets: third Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Bonnie Campbell and Robb Reavill

Course Manager: Bonnie Campbell

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Central Oregon Governing Council Forum

Wednesday, October 17, 12:15 p.m.

With the departure of two of our current, terrific Governing Council members, Steve Hussey and Pat Ackley, the Central Oregon Governing Council is looking to add a few more dedicated individuals.

There is no experience required to serve on Council, but we ask that nominees possess a love of OLLI-UO and have a collaborative personality. The next two years will be a pivotal point for our OLLI-UO program, and we are seeking action-oriented members to help tackle our ambitious Financial Sustainability Plan targets.

Serving on Governing Council consists of attending one two-hour meeting every month for a term of two years. If interested at all, we encourage you to attend our Governing Council Forum on Wednesday, October 17, at 12:15 p.m. at the UO Bend Center. The deadline for nominees to submit their names is Friday, October 19. A 200-word bio is due Monday, October 29. Please speak to one of our current Council members at the forum, or contact Governing Council President Suzanne Butterfield directly. We look forward to hearing from you!

The Museum at Warm Springs and Central Oregon Seed Field Trip

Friday, October 26, 8:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Join OLLI-UO friends for a fun day trip to two interesting stops: The Museum at Warm Springs and Central Oregon Seeds in Madras. A no-host lunch at the Cottonwood Restaurant in the Indian Head Casino follows the museum tour. Who wants to have an Indian fry bread taco salad?

The Museum at Warms Springs is having a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view six original pages of the 1855 treaty document—on loan from the National Archives in Washington. A unique piece of Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs history! We will also experience firsthand the sounds of ancient songs and languages, the mastery of traditional craftsmen and the sights of rich and colorful cultures that make up the Confederated Tribes of The Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon.

Following lunch, we travel to Madras to visit Central Oregon Seed, one of the major contractors of hybrid carrot seed for the world markets. They subcontract with growers in Central Oregon, in early spring each year, transplant young carrot roots (called steklings, small carrots roots that have been refrigerated to simulate winter), the root flowers—pollinated by honey bees—and make seed that is harvest in late summer. We will tour their seed conditioning (processing) plant to view many steps in hybrid carrot seed cleaning. Hybrid carrot seed production is a high risk-high reward crop for everyone involved. Hale storm can destroy the crop in moments and if the seed does not meet contract specifications for quality- no money is made.

We depart, via carpool, from the UO Bend Center parking lot at 8:30 a.m. on Friday, October 26, and return about 4:00 p.m. Expect to have some walking and standing for periods of time. Museum group entry fee for seniors is $4.50, which is due at the time of registration. Other costs include lunch and driver contribution. Gary Whiteaker is the trip organizer.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon All-Member Meeting

Wednesday, October 31, 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Join us for a light lunch provided by our Hospitality Committee and participate in an all-member meeting with our Governing Council. President Suzanne Butterfield speaks about our steps towards financial sustainability for OLLI-UO at both sites, Central Oregon and Eugene/Springfield. Learn about our membership growth and intriguing efforts for fundraising.


November 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In November

Propaganda, Fake News, Mis-Information, and Critical Thinking

Friday, November 16, 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Riverbend Community Room

Join us for a most timely presentation by Anne McGee, Col USAF (ret), PhD, to consider the long history of propaganda, its current uses, and tools for assessing the “propaganda-ness” of information. Our modern media environment has allowed the near-instantaneous dissemination of both fact and opinion, free of the need for editors or other intermediaries. The role of information technology in this process has far outpaced any efforts at educating citizens in recognizing attempts to manipulate audiences. As a result, it has become much easier to spread (mis)information with the intent to influence feelings, opinions, and actions of ever-larger groups of people.

When used by foreign powers, misinformation has become a form of weapon more difficult to counteract than conventional arms. But this is not an entirely new issue: since World War I, propaganda has been an essential element of international relations, used by governments and non-state actors to pursue their interests by influencing and manipulating foreign public opinion. A word with negative connotations for many, “propaganda” is nevertheless one of the defining concepts of the modern era, with implications for international and domestic audiences.

Anne’s doctoral work focused on the use of government information programs to influence attitudes and behaviors of foreign populations, so she will have some examples to share and a suggested reading list for those interested in delving deeper.

Dr. McGee’s education includes a bachelor’s degree in linguistic analysis, and master’s degrees in Business Administration, in Airpower Art and Science and in Resourcing National Strategy, and an interdisciplinary Doctorate from Georgetown University. She is an MIT Seminar XXI Fellow and a graduate of the Joint Forces Staff College, the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, and of the US Air Force Command and Staff College.

Colonel McGee’s career as a military strategist spans over 30 years, including service at many different levels within the Department of Defense. From 2000-2003, she served in the National Military Command Center at the Pentagon, followed by 3 years teaching military strategy, economics and information operations at the National Defense University. Most recently, she served as a Strategy Analyst for the Defense Institutional Reform Initiative, educating the civilian staffs of emerging democracies on planning and managing a Ministry of Defense that is responsive to democratically elected leadership.

Registration is not required. This event is open to the public, and members are encouraged to bring a guest who fits our OLLI-UO demographic.

Mastering Your iPhone: Workshops for the iPhone Challenged!

Wednesdays, November 7, 14, 28, 3:15–5:00 p.m.
Wednesdays, December 12 and 19, 3:15–5:00 p.m.
(Classes continue into January if there is interest)

Smart phones are at the hub of our communication systems for voice, email, and Internet.  Your iPhone has more computing power than a 1960 IBM mainframe computer.  Do you own an iPhone, but feel that you really don’t know how to use all of its many magic bells and whistles? Learn to tap and harness your iPhone’s power so you no longer need to ask others to help you.  Central Oregon OLLI member Gary Whiteaker and others help you learn more about your iPhone, whether you just purchased it, just updated it or have had it a long time.

This is a hands-on series of facilitated workshops, with some topics programmed by the coordinator and other topics determined by those attending the classes. Likely topics will include: how to set up “Find My Phone” and other security issues; using your phone to take pictures and “then what do I do?”; sharing photos; using Apple iCloud; address book tools; iPhone GPS, maps and directions; using “Hey Siri” Apple voice command system to do useful things.  Participants will watch a live iPhone image on a large classroom screen to learn and understand the systems and tools built into iPhones and applications (Apps).

Participants must bring a fully charged iPhone to each workshop session. Participants are also asked to bring with them their Apple ID username (usually an email address) and password associated with the Apple ID. The Apple ID information will be needed in order to access the settings on the iPhone. Android operating system phone users are welcome, but detailed technical information will not be available for Android phones.

Links to selected reading:

Members are asked to register once for all five sessions. Registration is required so that we can email important information to participants ahead of sessions. The course may extend into January, pending interest and availability of scheduling.

Courses

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent.  We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics:

  • November 6: How Did the Moon Form?; The Big Thwack! Facilitator: Alexa Dellinger
  • November 13: The “Big Six” Elements of Early Earth; The Black Earth–Peridotite to Basalt Facilitator: Russ Hopper
  • November 20: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving Break)
  • November 27: Origins of the Oceans; Blue Earth and the Water Cycle. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • December 4: Earth and Mars versus Mercury and the Moon; Gray Earth–Clays and the Rise of Granite Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • December 11:  Earth’s Mineralogy Takes Off–Pegmatites; Moving Continents and the Rock Cycle Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • December 18: Plate Tectonics Changes Everything; Geochemistry to Biochemistry–Raw Materials Facilitator: Larry Weinberg

Meets: Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Larry Weinberg

Victorian Britain

Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program Victorian England,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics:

  • November 7: China and the Opium War; The Crimean War 1854–1856. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • November 14: The Indian Mutiny 1857; Victorian Britain and American Civil War. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
  • November 21: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving Break)
  • November 28: The British in Africa 1840-1880; Victorian Literature. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • December 5: Art and Music; Science. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • December 12: Medicine and Public Health; Architecture. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • December 19: Education; Trade Unions and the Labour Party. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit Four: Medieval Lives)

Thursdays, November 1–December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people.

This course has been divided up into four units; Unit Four lasts six weeks and focuses on medieval lives. Registration is not required for the fourth and final unit. All members are welcome to attend!

Topics:

  • November 1: Being Anglo-Saxon; Being a Viking Raider. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • November 8: Living Under Norman Rule; Being Medieval. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • November 15: Being Poor in the Middle Ages; Being a Medieval Woman. Facilitator: Maggie Machala
  • November 22: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving Break)
  • November 29: Being a Medieval Christian or Heretic; Being a Medieval Knight. Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • December 6: Being a Crusader; Being a Pilgrim. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • December 13: Relaxing Medieval Style; Daily Life Matters. Facilitator: Pat Ackley

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 13

Meets: Thursdays, June 7–December 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Masterworks of American Art

Thursdays, September 13–December 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: Course managers Suzanne Butterfield and Burt Litman lead us through a sweeping survey of the brilliant paintings of American homegrown masters in 24 lectures over 12 separate sessions. These extraordinary artists document the birth of our nation from its colonial roots up to the brink of World War I and the birth of Modernism. As we examine this vital artistic tradition in its historical, cultural, and political contexts, we discover how the appreciation of the legacy of American art is crucial to understanding the story of our great nation.

A nation's identity is expressed through its art. Great painters capture the essence of a culture's brightest hopes, deepest anxieties, and most profound aspirations.

Our journey is supplemented by the lectures of Professor William Kloss, noted art historian revealing the vital and vibrant tradition of American art, with the educational DVD series titled “Masterworks of American Art.” Witness the birth, growth, and development of our great nation as it was painted by some of the greatest artists the world has known. (The Great Courses)

Suzanne or Burt lead the class sessions, unless otherwise noted below.

Topics:

  • November 1: The Civil War in Art; The Glow of Peace
  • November 8: Art–The Mirror of Social Change; 1876–1893—The Civic Revival of the Nation
  • November 15: 1885–1900—Contrasts of Dark and Light; Americans Abroad—Expatriate Painters
  • November 22: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving Break)
  • November 29: Thomas Eakins–Innovation and Rejection; Thomas Eakins—Success and Scandal
  • December 6: The Last Years—"And Who Is Eakins?”; Winslow Homer in England and New England
  • December 13: Winslow Homer—The Last Years; Ourselves and Our Posterity

Meets: Thursdays, September 13–December 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Suzanne Butterfield and Burt Litman

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, November 5 and 26, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Focus: The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

Selection: Why Does the World Exist: An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt

For November, the group examines Why Does the World Exist: An Existential Detective Story by Jim Holt, a bestseller and Washington Post notable non-fiction book for 2013. According to Wikipedia, a central question of the book is, “Why is there something rather than nothing?'” The answer lies in the domain between philosophy and scientific cosmology. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was the first to publish the question in 1714. In this book, Holt acts as a cosmological detective and records a quest to answer that question through a series of interviews and discussions. Some of the people interviewed are John Updike, David Deutsch, Adolf Grünbaum, John Leslie, Derek Parfit, Roger Penrose, Richard Swinburne, Steven Weinberg, and Andrei Linde. Along the way, Holt also introduces the reader to the philosophy of mathematics, theology, physics, ontology, epistemology, and other subjects.

Facilitator: Jim Hammond

Meets: first and third Mondays of the month*, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

*the November schedule has been adjusted to accommodate for no class on Veteran’s Day

Course Manager: Joyce Pickersgill

December’s selection: The Plot to Hack America: How Putin’s Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election by Malcolm Lance, facilitated by Kathryn Cullen

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, November 19, 10:15 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Selection: Eventide by Kent Haruf

This month, the group discusses the second novel in Kent Haruf’s Plainsong trilogy, Eventide, returning to the high-plains town of Holt, Colorado. The idea of family is front and center in Eventide as the aging, gentle-hearted McPheron brothers are learning to live without Victoria Roubideaux, the single mother they took in, but who has departed for college. A lonely young boy faithfully cares for his grandfather, while a violent relative intimidates a disabled couple fighting to keep their family together. Haruf reveals a wide range of humanity in profoundly moving accounts of his characters’ lives as they unfold and entwine for good and for ill. His depiction of the hardships of small-town life are accompanied by Haruf's tender sympathy for his characters, no matter how flawed, and their resilient ability to find family in one another.

Facilitator: Robin Robinson

Meets: second Mondays of the month*, 10:15 a.m.–noon

*the November schedule has been adjusted to accommodate for no class on Veteran’s Day

Course Manager: Deb Hollens

December’s selection: The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott, facilitated by Deb Hollens

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, November 26, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

Topic: One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975) 2 hours 13 minutes

Cast: Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Will Sampson, Michael Berryman

An American comedy-drama based on the novel by Ken Kesey, the film won all five major academy awards and is considered one of the best movies ever made. Much of it was filmed in the Oregon State Hospital in Salem. Jack Nicholson plays Randle P. McMurphy, a manic, free-spirited repeat criminal who fakes insanity to avoid going to prison. Once in the mental institution, he rebels against the mind-numbing routine and Nurse Ratched, one of the most villainous characters in all of film history.

Facilitator: Rod Charny

Meets: third Mondays of the month*, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

*the November schedule has been adjusted to accommodate for no class on Veteran’s Day

Course Manager: Bonnie Campbell

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Registration is not required.

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

OLLI-UO Central Oregon New Member Welcome

Monday, November 5, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

For all those OLLI-UO members that just joined in the past few months or those who have not been to a New Member Welcome, please join us on Monday, November 5. The Welcome is a great way to get to know fellow new members and members of the Governing Council. We share experiences and background and helpful hints on how to best maximize your OLLI-UO experience. Hope to see you there!

Crater Lake Spirits Field Trip and Lunch

Friday, November 30, 10:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

If you like spirits or just want to see what all the talk is about, join our OLLI-UO Central Oregon field trip to Bendistillery, where Crater Lake Spirits are devloped. Participants depart the UO Bend Center parking lot at 10:30, take a one-hour tour of the distillery in Tumalo and return about 2:00 p.m. after having a fun lunch at Pisano’s Woodfired Pizza in "downtown" Tumalo.

In business locally since 1996, Crater Lake Distillery makes thirteen unique products at their facility. According to their story, they are America’s most award-winning small batch distillery and have ignited the craft cocktail revolution. They also expanded out of Oregon and are distributed in twenty-six states. On the 24-acre farm property in Tumalo, they have a tasting room that serves up free tastings and tours seven days a week, as well as bottle sales and a gift shop.

Registration for this field trip event begins Friday, November 2, and ends Wednesday November 28. We have a limit of 25 for this field trip. Dress for the November weather and wear your walking shoes to be comfortable.

Crater Lake Spirits Distillery address: 19330 Pinehurst Road, Bend (Tumalo)
Phone: 541-318-0200

Lunch in Tumalo at Pisano's Pizza, 64670 Strickler Avenue, Bend, (Tumalo)
Phone: 541-312-9349

Coming in December

WWII Japanese-American Internment Camps: An Oregon Family’s Experience

Tuesday, December 4, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Eric Ballinger is the grandson of Harry Takeshi Morioki, who, during the winter of 1942, was taken with his family from their home in The Dalles, Oregon and placed in an internment camp on the West Coast. Over the course of the next three years, 127,000 first- and second-generation Japanese immigrants were relocated to camps where they lived behind barbed wire.

In this presentation, Ballinger shares the conditions in the United States—and particularly Central Oregon—that resulted in President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, dated February 19, 1942, that mandated the internment of Japanese citizens on the West coast. Eric also shares the long-term effects on his family and how they reacted to the change in treatment by the American government. Ballinger's presentation is a touching and compelling story of survival in a time when a community's hate toward an ethnic, racial, or immigrant group spirals out of control.

Registration is not required

Family-inspired Fiction: Stories Hiding in Family Documents and Mementos

Wednesday, December 5, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Come listen to Ginger Dehlinger, Central Oregon novelist, as she shares her insights about “writing what you know” to entice Central Oregon OLLI participants to begin writing. Finding inspiration through family oral stories and preserved documents may spur you to create your own stories as a hobby, become a blogger, or begin a new career.

A University of Oregon graduate and member of the Central Oregon Writer’s Guild, Women Writing the West, and a fastidious critique group, Ginger has included family experiences in her two novels, Brute Heart and Never Done. She continues to write about family in a growing number of short stories. Her interest in nature shows up mostly in poems and essays, and in chapter six of a recently-published coffee table book, Cabin Cruising, A Lakeside History.

Join Ginger on the first Wednesday of December to learn about sources of inspiration; fact, fiction, or creative nonfiction; prose, poetry, or posts; preserving anonymity; self-publishing versus agent/publisher; and perseverance.

Registration is not required.


December 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured in December

WWII Japanese-American Internment Camps: An Oregon Family’s Experience

Tuesday, December 4, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Eric Ballinger is the grandson of Harry Takeshi Morioki, who, during the winter of 1942, was taken with his family from their home in The Dalles, Oregon, and placed in an internment camp on the West Coast. Over the course of the next three years, 127,000 first- and second-generation Japanese immigrants were relocated to camps where they lived behind barbed wire.

In this presentation, Ballinger shares the conditions in the United States—and particularly Central Oregon—that resulted in President Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066, dated February 19, 1942, that mandated the internment of Japanese citizens on the West coast. Eric also shares the long-term effects on his family and how they reacted to the change in treatment by the American government. Ballinger's presentation is a touching and compelling story of survival in a time when a community's hate toward an ethnic, racial, or immigrant group spirals out of control.

Registration is not required

Family-Inspired Fiction: Stories Hiding in Family Documents and Mementos

Wednesday, December 5, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Come listen to Ginger Dehlinger, Central Oregon novelist, as she shares her insights about “writing what you know” to entice Central Oregon OLLI participants to begin writing. Finding inspiration through family oral stories and preserved documents may spur you to create your own stories as a hobby, become a blogger, or begin a new career.

A University of Oregon graduate and member of the Central Oregon Writer’s Guild, Women Writing the West, and a fastidious critique group, Ginger has included family experiences in her two novels, Brute Heart and Never Done. She continues to write about family in a growing number of short stories. Her interest in nature shows up mostly in poems and essays, and in chapter six of a recently-published coffee table book, Cabin Cruising, A Lakeside History.

Join Ginger on the first Wednesday of December to learn about sources of inspiration; fact, fiction, or creative nonfiction; prose, poetry, or posts; preserving anonymity; self-publishing versus agent/publisher; and perseverance.

Registration is not required.

Power-Up your Charitable Giving with Estate and IRA Planning

Wednesday, December 12, 12:15–2:00 p.m.

UO Directors of Development Pete Korstad and Mike Ritchey provide an introduction of what he does for UO, and how his office can work with our OLLI-UO members specifically, as we work towards our financial sustainability goals.

The session will begin with general education on estate planning (including wills, trusts, designating beneficiaries, tax treatment of assets, etc.) and one specific type of estate asset, the IRA. From there, we’ll look at how these two areas can be used to meet the charitable goals you have. Topics will include using required minimum distributions from IRAs to support charitable giving, the charitable IRA rollover (also known as a qualified charitable distribution), characteristics of assets (real estate, stock accounts, IRAs, etc.) to consider when making charitable gifts, and more. There will be plenty of time for questions, so bring yours along!

Our presenter is Mike Ritchey, planned giving officer at the University of Oregon. Mike holds degrees in Finance (BS ’80) and Marketing (MBA ’81) from the UO, and earned the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) certification in 1991. Prior to joining the UO in 2011, he spent over 20 years working in the personal financial planning profession. Mike was born and raised in Springfield, Oregon, is married to a retired middle school teacher, and represents the middle of three generations of his family to earn UO degrees.

Registration is not required; all members are encouraged to attend. A light lunch will be provided.

Courses

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent.  We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics:

  • December 4: Earth and Mars versus Mercury and the Moon; Gray Earth–Clays and the Rise of Granite. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • December 11:  Earth’s Mineralogy Takes Off–Pegmatites; Moving Continents and the Rock Cycle. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • December 18: Plate Tectonics Changes Everything; Geochemistry to Biochemistry–Raw Materials. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • January 8: Why Reproduction? World Enough and Time; Eons, Eras, and Strategies of Early Life. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • January 15: Red Earth—The Great Oxidation Event; Earliest Microbial and Molecular Fossils? Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • January 22: Microbial Mats and Which Minerals Can Form; Earth’s Greatest Mineral Explosion. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • January 29: The Boring Billion? Cratons and Continents; The Supercontinent Cycle. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg

Meets: Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Larry Weinberg

Victorian Britain

Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program Victorian England,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics:

  • December 5: Art and Music; Science. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • December 12: Medicine and Public Health; Architecture. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • December 19: Education; Trade Unions and the Labour Party. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • January 9: Crime and Punishment; Gladstone and Disraeli 1685-1881. Facilitator: Bruce Sharp
  • January 16: Ireland and Home Rule; Democracy and Its Discontents. Facilitator: Bruce Sharp
  • January 23: The British in Africa 1880-1901; Later Victorian Literature. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
  • January 30: Leisure; Domestic Servants. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • February 6: Victoria After Albert 1861-1901; The Victorian Legacy. Facilitator: Pat Ackley

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Mastering Your iPhone: Workshops for the iPhone Challenged!

Wednesdays, November 7, 14, 28, 3:15–5:00 p.m.
Wednesdays, December 12 and 19, 3:15–5:00 p.m.

(Classes continue into January if there is interest)

Smart phones are at the hub of our communication systems for voice, email, and Internet.  Your iPhone has more computing power than a 1960 IBM mainframe computer.  Do you own an iPhone, but feel that you really don’t know how to use all of its many magic bells and whistles? Learn to tap and harness your iPhone’s power so you no longer need to ask others to help you.  Central Oregon OLLI member Gary Whiteaker and others help you learn more about your iPhone, whether you just purchased it, just updated it or have had it a long time.

This is a hands-on series of facilitated workshops, with some topics programmed by the coordinator and other topics determined by those attending the classes. Likely topics will include: how to set up “Find My Phone” and other security issues; using your phone to take pictures and “then what do I do?”; sharing photos; using Apple iCloud; address book tools; iPhone GPS, maps and directions; using “Hey Siri” Apple voice command system to do useful things.  Participants will watch a live iPhone image on a large classroom screen to learn and understand the systems and tools built into iPhones and applications (Apps).

Participants must bring a fully charged iPhone to each workshop session.  Android operating system phone users are welcome, but detailed technical information will not be available for Android phones.

Links to selected reading:

Members are asked to register once for all five sessions. Registration is required so that we can email important information to participants ahead of sessions.

The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World (Unit Four: Medieval Lives)

Thursdays, November 1–December 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people.

This course has been divided up into four units; Unit Four lasts six weeks and focuses on medieval lives. Registration is not required for the fourth and final unit. All members are welcome to attend!

Topics:

  • December 6: Being a Crusader; Being a Pilgrim. Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • December 13: Relaxing Medieval Style; Daily Life Matters. Facilitator: Pat Ackley

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 13

Meets: Thursdays, June 7–December 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Masterworks of American Art

Thursdays, September 13–December 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: Course managers Suzanne Butterfield and Burt Litman lead us through a sweeping survey of the brilliant paintings of American homegrown masters in 24 lectures over 12 separate sessions. These extraordinary artists document the birth of our nation from its colonial roots up to the brink of World War I and the birth of Modernism. As we examine this vital artistic tradition in its historical, cultural, and political contexts, we discover how the appreciation of the legacy of American art is crucial to understanding the story of our great nation.

A nation's identity is expressed through its art. Great painters capture the essence of a culture's brightest hopes, deepest anxieties, and most profound aspirations.

Our journey is supplemented by the lectures of Professor William Kloss, noted art historian revealing the vital and vibrant tradition of American art, with the educational DVD series titled “Masterworks of American Art.” Witness the birth, growth, and development of our great nation as it was painted by some of the greatest artists the world has known. (The Great Courses)

Suzanne or Burt lead the class sessions, unless otherwise noted below.

Topics:

  • December 6: The Last Years—"And Who Is Eakins?”; Winslow Homer in England and New England
  • December 13: Winslow Homer—The Last Years; Ourselves and Our Posterity

Meets: Thursdays, September 13–December 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Course Managers: Suzanne Butterfield and Burt Litman

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, December 3 and 17, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Focus: The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

Selection: The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election by Malcolm Nance

For December, the group examines The Plot to Hack America by Malcolm Nance. Published a month before the 2016 presidential election, Nance examines Russian interference in that election as the CIA is drafting their own report.

In April 2016, computer technicians at the Democratic National Committee discover that someone has accessed the organization’s computer servers and has helped themselves to sensitive documents, emails, donor information, even voicemails. Soon after, the remainder of the Democratic Party machine, the congressional campaign, the Clinton campaign, and their friends and allies in the media are also hacked. Western intelligence agencies track the hack to Russian spy agencies and dub them the “Cyber Bears.” The media is soon flooded with the stolen information channeled through Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks. It is a massive attack on America, but the Russian hacks appear to have a singular goal: elect Donald J. Trump as president of the United States.

The Plot to Hack America is the story of how Putin’s spy agency, run by the Russian billionaire class, use the promise of power and influence to cultivate Trump, as well as his closest aides, to become unwitting assets of the Russian government. (some info from Goodreads)

Facilitator: Kathryn Cullen

Meets: first and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Course Manager: Joyce Pickersgill

January’s selection: In the Shadow of Statues by Mitch Landrieu, facilitated by Susan Groscziewicz

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, December 10, 10:15 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Selection: The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott

In December, Page-Turner participants discussAlice McDermott’s The Ninth Hour, finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction and on the "best fiction of 2017" lists of numerous publications.

In early twentieth century Brooklyn, in a neighborhood of Irish Catholics, a young man opens the gas taps in his dilapidated tenement, committing suicide and leaving a young pregnant wife.  In the aftermath of the ensuing fire, Sister St Savior, an aging nun, provides the young widow and her baby, Sally, with emotional support and work in the convent basement laundry.  Sally, who is raised with the help of the good “Little Nursing Sisters of the Sick Poor, Congregation of Mary Before the Cross,” becomes the center of the story.  “The characters we meet, from Sally . . . to the nuns whose personalities we come to know and love, to the neighborhood families with whose lives they are entwined, are all rendered with extraordinary sympathy and McDermott’s trademark lucidity and intelligence.” (some info from Goodreads)

Facilitator: Deb Hollens

Meets: second Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Course Manager: Deb Hollens

January’s selection: Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather, facilitated by Robin Robinson

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, December 17, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

Topic: The Birdcage (1996) 2 hours

Cast: Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Dianne West

This thoroughly enjoyable film based on the 1978 Franco-Italian film La Cage Aux Folles is the story of gay cabaret owner and his drag queen companion whose straight son wants them to meet his fiancée's parents. Comic chaos ensues, as her right-wing father is a US Senator and co-founder of the Committee for Moral Order. What could possibly go wrong?

Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell

Meets: third Mondays of the month*, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Course Manager: Bonnie Campbell

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Registration is not required.

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Please note: There are scheduling changes for this month, as follows:

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

OLLI-UO Town Hall

Wednesday, December 5, 12:15–1:15 p.m.

Join us for our annual joint OLLI-UO videoconference meeting with UO Vice-President Roger Thompson and our Eugene/Springfield members. Vice-President Thompson will provide an update from the office of Student Services and Enrollment Management (the department under which Continuing and Professional Education is housed). Mr. Thompson’s opening remarks will address the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon. He will take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon Annual Holiday Party

Friday, December 14, noon–2:00 p.m.

The holiday season is once again upon us and that means it will soon be time for the Annual Holiday Party! Get ready to join your fellow OLLI-UO members in recapping our wonderful 2018 programming, discussing goals and activities for 2019, and getting to know our newly-elected Council members.

In the coming weeks, we will be asking for your help in putting the party together. We will need volunteers to bring food and drinks, and help with a trivia quiz, decorations, and set up. If you have any questions about the party, or know already that you want to volunteer, contact Terry Schwab. Registration will be announced via email and members are asked to contribute $5.00 per person to help cover facility and refreshment costs. Guests and/or partners of members are welcome. This year, members get to decide what to bring rather than be assigned a type of dish by last name. Please let us know what you plan to bring by contacting Margie deLeon.  Season’s Greetings!

Shared Interest Groups

Shared Interest Groups (SIGs) are a great way for OLLI-UO Central Oregon members to continue lifelong learning beyond the classroom! These groups provide new opportunities to form friendships with other members around shared interests. They are independent and self-directed, with members deciding where and when to meet and how the group will function.

As an OLLI member, you may be interested in forming a SIG that meets for a weekly lunch, plays pickleball, shares gardening tips, enjoys nature walks or foreign movies. Other examples: Genealogy, Conversational Spanish, Archeology, Day Hikes, Science Fiction Movies, Beginning Bridge, Photography, Plant-based Living, Culinary Adventures . . . and more.

Opportunities are endless, but keep these guidelines in mind:

  • SIGs are open to all interested current OLLI-UO members, with a minimum of four participants required to establish a SIG.
  • All SIGs are held off-site, as space in the Bend classroom is limited due to regular use by program courses and activities.  Options include members’ homes or venues related to the SIG’s activity (movie theaters, restaurants, libraries, recreational facilities, etc.).
  • SIGs do not take the place of OLLI courses. They complement and enhance classes and other programs offered by OLLI-UO Central Oregon; they are not to compete with or duplicate them.
  • Proposed SIG activity is consistent with UO and OLLI-UO policies, and participants agree to adhere to the UO Code of Conduct

How to Start a New Shared Interest Group

Have an idea for a SIG? Talk with other OLLI members about creating a SIG around your particular interest or post a sign-up sheet in the classroom. When you have four or more members expressing interest in joining, submit a SIG Proposal Form to SIG Coordinator, Pat Ackley. She will provide you with a copy of the guidelines.

  • Begin by reading the guidelines completely so that you understand the purpose, structure, and operation of the SIGs and the entire process for establishing one.
  • Complete a Proposal Form online or pick up a paper form in the office and submit to the SIG Coordinator or to the OLLI-UO staff.  The proposal should include a description suitable for inclusion on the OLLI-UO website. For questions about the program, contact Pat Ackley, SIG Coordinator.

Coming in January

The Vikings

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans. Course Manager, Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members will facilitate this course.

As explorers and traders, the Vikings played a decisive role in the formation of Latin Christendom, and particularly of Western Europe. In this course, we study the Vikings not only as warriors, but also in other roles for which they were equally extraordinary: merchants, artists, kings, raiders, seafarers, shipbuilders, and creators of a remarkable literature of myths and sagas.

Among the topics we explore in depth are the profound influence of the Norse gods and heroes on Viking culture, and the Vikings' extraordinary accomplishments as explorers and settlers in Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. With the help of archeological findings, we learn to analyze Viking ship burials, runestones and runic inscriptions, Viking woodcarving, jewelry, sculpture, and metalwork.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today.

Topics:

  • January 10: The Vikings in Medieval History; Land and People of Medieval Scandinavia
  • January 17: Scandinavian Society in the Bronze Age; Scandinavia in the Celtic & Roman Ages
  • January 24: The Age of Migrations; The Norse Gods
  • January 31: NO CLASS
  • February 7: Runes, Poetry, and Visual Arts; Legendary Kings and Heroes
  • February 14: A Revolution in Shipbuilding; Warfare and Society in the Viking Age
  • February 21: NO CLAA
  • February 28: Merchants and Commerce in the Viking Age; Christendom on the Eve of the Viking Age

Meets: Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Topics in Art History: Seven Talks by Roger C. Aikin, PhD

Thursdays, January 10–February 29, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Registration is not required.

Focus: OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aikin, PhD, is a retired professor of art history from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He has hand selected seven topics to present to our members. Details will follow when the January updates have been made, but mark your calendars now and plan to attend the following sessions:

  • January 10: Jan Vermeer and Han Van Meegeren:  The Master and the Forger
  • January 17: Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: the Ceiling and the Last Judgement
  • January 24: Andrea del Verrocchio’s Baptism of Christ and the Idea of “Sprezzatura”
  • January 31: Paintings of the Great Migration in American Art 
  • February 7: North and South in Gothic Architecture
  • February 14: A Sunday Walk in Rome
  • February 21: NO CLASS
  • February 28: The Unfashionable Human Body through the Ages in Art, Fashion, and Pop Culture

All of these talks are live lectures with Dr. Aikin. Each session considers an issue or aspect of art history with interesting artworks and issues that relate to the present day. There will be plenty of time for discussion during and after each presentation. No particular preparation or reading is required, although Roger will have suggestions for further reading and research if members so choose.

Meets: Thursdays, January 10–February 28, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Course Manager: Roger Aikin