Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon Courses and Activities

Current Central Oregon course offerings are listed below. Course and activity descriptions for the following month will be published mid-month. Minor edits of topics and facilitators will be updated at the end of the month.

Members will be notified of monthly updates and critical changes via email. We encourage you to check both the course and activity descriptions and the course calendar at the middle and end of the month! Important announcements, like the President's Note and other notifications, will be published as information is available (up to twice per month).

October 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured in October

Special All-Member Meeting

Wednesday, October 2, noon–2:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

A special All-Member Meeting has been scheduled for the afternoon of October 2, immediately following the third Mesoamerican architecture class. A light lunch will be provided. OLLI-UO in Central Oregon Council President Suzanne Butterfield will respond to some member requests for a meeting that delves into OLLI-UO program finances, with a specific look at the Central Oregon budget. She will address the Financial Sustainability Plan for fiscal year 2020–2022 for OLLI-UO with a focus on the OLLI-UO in Central Oregon challenge to grow membership and raise funds to close the funding gap that the University of Oregon Continuing and Professional Education Department has been filling each year. OLLI-UO in Eugene/Springfield has similar challenges, but this meeting will focus only on Central Oregon goals and actions to meet those goals. We did very well in fiscal year 2019, increasing members served by 15% and raising about $17,000 for Central Oregon. Now we need to focus on this and the next several years.

Please come be part of the discussion. OLLI belongs to all of us and we all need to weigh in with our ideas and preferences. We hope to see a big turnout!

A Short History of Electronic Display

Mondays, October 14 and 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Photograph of Henry Sayre.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Join Henry Sayre, distinguished professor emeritus of art history at Oregon State University Cascades, for a fascinating look at the history of display from the slide to the digital image. Henry will be offering two presentations at the Elks Lodge.

On November 15, 1888, William Morris, founder of the British design firm, Morris and Co., went to a slide lecture by the typographer Emery Walker at a meeting of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society. That night he saw a series of brilliantly colored magic-lantern slides of photographs of illuminated books, projected through one of the newly powerful (likely German-made) gas lanterns that were even then revolutionizing the study of art history as well.

Today, the slide lecture has been transformed. The slide is dead, replaced by the digital image. The slide lecture is gone, replaced by the PowerPoint presentation. Kodak produced its last carousel slide projector in October 22, 2004. It ended production of Kodachrome slide film in June 2009, and on March 1, 2012, the company announced that it would no longer produce any slide film at all. We have undergone a revolution in the technologies of display, which has been of far more consequence than one might at first glance assume.

Henry Sayre is producer and creator of the 10-part television series, A World of Art: Works in Progress, first aired on PBS in the fall of 1997, and the author of nine books, including The Object of Performance: The American Avant-Garde since 1970 (University of Chicago Press, 1989), a children’s book, Cave Paintings to Picasso (Chronicle Books, 2004), and A World of Art, an art appreciation text now in its eighth edition.

Don’t miss this great presentation by a captivating speaker…a favorite here at OLLI-UO in Central Oregon!

Meets

Mondays, October 14 and 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Presenter

Henry Sayre

Lectures

Shaping Place in Mesoamerica: Ten Ancient Cities from Olmec to Aztec, Part 1

Wednesdays, October 2 and 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

A lecture series offered in two parts. Registration is not required.

Part 1: Intro to Mesoamerica, The Olmec, the Mesoamerican Calendar, and Teotihuacan (1400 BC – AD 650)

Part 2 (offered in early 2020): Cities of the Ancient Maya and Aztec (AD 100 – 1521)

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Between 1400 BC and AD 1521, Mesoamerica (the most architecturally-intensive region of North America) was home to thousands of ancient kingdoms and a few metropoli, forged by people from dozens of distinct cultures. Each ancient city had a distinctive visual character. In fact, it could be said that the focus of ancient Mesoamerican architects was on shaping earth or stone to define and manifest the specific qualities and history of a place.

The first part of this course provides an overview of Mesoamerican geography, time periods, and the earliest monumental civilizations of the Americas. Along the way, we will uncover the secrets of the Mesoamerican calendar and examine the sophisticated observational systems of ancient astronomy.

This series of four lectures examines how important cities from different cultures built unique visual identities that reflected their local topography, explained their historical founding and the protection of their patron deities, and linked their location with a recurring astronomical phenomenon.

TOPICS
October 2: Counting Time/Space to Create Place: The Mesoamerican Calendar

One of the unique features of Mesoamerica was its overlapping calendar systems. To grasp the essence of Mesoamerican thought, one must have a decent sense of the calendar. It regulated everything – from a person’s name and fate, to the unfolding of ritual processions, to the scale of buildings and design of cities. Although the basic calendar cycles were shared by most civilizations, the days and cycles had different names in different cultures. So, get ready to have your mind twisted a bit.

October 9: Teotihuacan: Facts and Mysteries of an Early American Metropolis (200 BC– AD 650)

Around 100 BC, people in the highland Basin of Mexico began to build the largest urban center in the Americas, called Teotihuacan. Not only did it eventually have a population of over 130,000, but it became a cosmopolitan center with enclaves of people from other cultural regions. Despite these and other unsolved questions, the monumental pyramids still stand as testimony of the city’s greatness and power.

We are fortunate to have Bend resident Professor Carolyn E. Tate share her knowledge of the ancient art of the Americas. She curated the Pre-Columbian collection at the Dallas Museum of Art prior to starting her 23-year tenure at Texas Tech University. She has explored most of the major sites in Mesoamerica, with a special interest in the landscapes that surround them and the efforts each city made to create a unique place. Dr. Tate’s two books: Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City and Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation focus on how Mesoamericans situated their ritual-civic centers in place, history, and cosmology.

MEETS

Wednesdays, October 2 and 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

Courses

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30 p.m.–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

Registration is not required

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Open your mind this fall to the possibility that what you think you know about science is not the whole truth. Join us as our OLLI-UO science class considers popular scientific misconceptions.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member and resident scientist-at-large, Jim Hammond, helps us examine misunderstood science concepts: aliens, what’s inside the atom, how planes fly, human intelligence, the truth about radiation, and even how quantum mechanics really works.

Professor Don Lincoln, a Senior Scientist at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, introduces these topics in a magnificent 24-lecture video course offered through The Teaching Company.  The lessons bust myths, clear up confusion, and deliver scientific epiphanies that change how we think about the everyday world.

“Science,” Professor Lincoln says, “is built on facts, sure. But it’s also a methodology for determining and accepting—or rejecting—those facts. And inherent in science is a perpetual level of uncertainty and ignorance. Science has to be prepared to change and grow.”

Understanding the Misconceptions of Science explores truths about some of science’s most well known—and often-controversial topics. Ultimately, Professor Lincoln’s research-backed lectures offer newer, better, and more accurate ways to understand and evaluate commonly misunderstood scientific ideas.

TOPICS
  • October 1:  What the World Gets Wrong About Science; Franklin’s Kite and Other Electrifying Myths
  • October 8: The Ideal Gas Law (It’s Not Ideal); From the Ground Up; How Flying Works
  • October 15: From the Sky Down: How Falling Works; Myths of Orbital Motion
  • October 22: What’s Inside Atoms? The Truth Is In Here: The Science of Aliens
  • October 29: Misconceptions About Evolution; Nutrition’s All About You–and Your Gut Biome
  • November 5: Humans Are Not Peas: Myths About Genetics; Getting Smarter About Intelligence
  • November 12: Exposing the Truth About Radiation; Does Carbon-14 Dating Work?
  • November 19: How Statistics Can Lie to You; Does Thermodynamics Disprove Evolution?
  • November 26: How Relativity Is Misunderstood; E=mc2 and Other Relativity Myths
  • December 3: Why Do Black Holes Get Such a Bad Rap; What Banged and Was It Big?
  • No Venue December 10 and 17
  • January 7: Can You Go Faster Than Light? Untangling How Quantum Mechanics Works
  • January 14: Untangling What Quantum Mechanics Means; Is There a Theory of Everything?
MEETS

Tuesdays, October 1–January 14, 1:30–3:30 p.m. (No class December 10 through December 31)

COURSE MANAGER

Russ Hopper

Turning Points in American History (Part 1)

Wednesdays, October 16–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration required and starts September 25. Please note: this lecture series is open to current participants with a six-month or annual membership.

*Part 2 of this course will be offered later in 2020.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

focus

Turning Points in American History relives the most powerful and groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States of America.

These Great Courses lectures, delivered by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell of College of the Holy Cross, offer a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U.S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, this course is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again. The topics are covered more from a "cultural history" or "sociology" perspective than traditional (dates, Great Men, etc.).

Whether they took the form of

  • groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts,
  • dramatic military victories and defeats,
  • nationwide social and religious movements, or
  • technological and scientific innovations,

these and other turning points forever changed the character of America politically, socially, culturally, and economically. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were subtler. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades.

Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood. Knowing what these events are, how they came about, and their dramatic effects is essential to grasping the full story of this great world power. It may even offer you vital clues as to where America is headed in the coming years and decades.

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate this new course.

This comprehensive course is broken into four different parts, allowing members to experience a history course without enduring a lengthy commitment. The second part will be offered after the first of the year.

TOPICS: Part I
  • October 16: 1617 The Great Epidemic; 1619 Land of the Free? Slavery Begins
  • October 23: 1636 Freedom of Worship–Roger Williams; 1654 Yearning to Breathe Free–Immigration
  • October 30: 1676 Near Disaster–King Philip’s War; 1735 Freedom of the Press–The Zenger Trial
  • November 6: 1773 Liberty! The Boston Tea Party; 1776 We’re Outta Here–Declaring Independence
  • November 13: 1777 Game Changer–The Battle of Saratoga; 1786 Toward a Constitution Shay’s Rebellion
  • November 20: 1789 Samuel Slater–The Industrial Revolution; 1800 Peaceful Transfer–The Election of 1800
  • December 4: 1803 Supreme Authority–Marbury v. Madison; 1807 On the Move–Transportation Revolution
  • December 11:  1816 One Man, One Vote–Expanding Suffrage; 1821 Reborn–The Second Great Awakening
MEETS

Wednesdays, October 16–December 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, October 7 and 21, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation.

TOPIC

Selection: Strangers in Their Own Land by Arlie Hochschild

In Strangers in Their Own Land the sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild embarks on a journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country, a stronghold of conservatism. There she finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets – people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream–and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. She helps us understand what it feels like to live in "red" America. Along the way she examines the question of why people appear to vote against their self-interest.

November’s selection: Doing Justice by Preet Bharara

FACILITATOR

Kathryn Cullen

Course manager

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, October 14, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701 (boardroom)

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member over the course of the year selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Newlyweds Roy and Celestial, middle-class African-Americans, happily married and upwardly mobile, find their lives ripped apart when Roy is wrongfully convicted of rape and sentenced to twelve years in prison.  In a series of letters and first person narratives Roy and Celeste address the tragic impact on their relationship.  While Roy’s life disintegrates, Celeste must decide between her allegiance to a fractured marriage and a chance at a life of her own.

An American Marriage was longlisted for the 2018 National Book Award.  It was on President Barack Obama’s 2018 summer reading list, won the 2019 Women’s Prize for Fiction and was a 2018 Best of the Year selection by NPR.

November’s selection: My Antonia by Willa Cather

Facilitator

Deb Hollens

CoURSE MANAGER

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the Month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, October 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Deschutes Historical Museum, 129 NW Idaho Ave, Bend, OR 97703

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Carolyn Hammond

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, September 30, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We view films from a variety of genres selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards. Group members share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

TOPIC

Science Fair (2018) 1 hr. 30 min.

Cast:  Jack Andraka, Serena McCalla

Director: Cristina Costantini, Darren Foster

Writers: Cristina Costantini, Darren Foster, Jeff Plunkett

National Geographic Documentary Films' Science Fair follows nine incredible high school students from around the world as they compete at the International Science and Engineering Fair on their journey to change the world through science. Only one student can be awarded “Best in Fair.” “Supremely entertaining. An ode to the teenage science geeks on whom our future depends.” (Variety)

Science Fair was winner of the Festival Favorite Award at Sundance 2018.

Facilitator

John Dulzo

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, October 3, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant

Cascade Village Shopping Center

63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Member Barbara Jordan will be making reservations for this month’s luncheon. Let her know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

First Friday Art Walk

Friday, October 4, 2:00–5:00 p.m.

This field trip is full. Please call 800-824-2714 to be added to the waitlist, as we are compiling names for future tours.

This field trip is limited to 15 participants. *If the field trip is full and/or you are interested in future art walks, please ask to be added to the waitlist for this class so that we can compile an email list and coordinate two groups in the future.

Member Kathryn Cullen has arranged a fun first Friday art walk field trip to three art galleries in Bend on First Friday, October 4. Participants will complete the visit before the galleries will be welcoming other visitors to their gallery at 5:00 p.m. so it will not be too crowded with non-OLLI visitors. Participants will meet at Red Chair Gallery (103 NW Oregon) for our first visit. The itinerary is as follows:

At each gallery, we will have one or two artists present to describe their work and their process, allowing time for Q&A. The gallery owner will also take a few minutes at the beginning to describe the gallery mission and introduce the artists.

Registration is required and the field trip is limited to 15 attendees. Participants will all meet at Red Chair Gallery promptly at 2:00 p.m. then will walk to the other two galleries. The three galleries are within a half-mile of each other.

Any questions can be answered by field trip coordinator Kathryn Cullen. You may obtain Kathryn’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

Deschutes National Forest–Bend Seed Extractory Tour

Friday, October 18, 9:00–11:30 a.m.

Registration required and starts September 25. Please note: this field trip is open to current participants with a six-month or annual membership.

The Bend Seed Extractory (BSE) facility receives daily shipments of grasses, shrubs, berries and more from across the West, as part of an effort to collect and preserve the seeds of thousands of wild plants growing on federal lands. This unique and interesting seed extraction facility located in Bend is one of the major seed extractories, private or government, in the Western U.S. It's a critical link to native restoration of our western landscapes.

The BSE extracts, processes, tests, packages, and stores seed for more than 3,000 different species. Native seeds collected at the facility grow into plants that help restore thousands of acres across the West, in some cases improving the health of ecosystems that have been overrun with noxious or invasive plants.

The seed extractory has been operating in Bend for about 60 years, starting along with the former Bend Pine Nursery. It originally focused on getting the seeds out of pinecones, but in the early 1990s, the seed experts also started handling grasses, forbs, shrubs, and more.

Don’t miss this opportunity to explore a facility that is essential to our western ecosystem!

Deschutes National Forest Headquarters

63095 Deschutes Market Rd, Bend, OR  97701

Participants will depart from the Elks Lodge parking lot at 9:00 a.m.

At noon after our tour, we are planning a group lunch at Backyard Brick Oven Pizza (across from Elks). We will return to Elks parking lot at 1:15 p.m.

Our field trip coordinator, Gary Whiteaker, can answer questionsbtain Gary’s contact information by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu

September 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured in September

The Lowdown on the Top End of the Land Down Under

Monday, September 16, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Photograph by Robert Agli

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

Join Bend photographer Robert Agli and Cascade Camera Club Principal Ralph Delamarter for a stunning photo essay of their 16-day expedition in the national parks of the Northern Territory of Australia. Their exquisite photos of crocodiles, exotic birds, native people, and landscapes are accompanied by tips on traveling in remote areas and entertaining tales of their adventures in the land “down under.”

Photography has been Robert Agli’s passion since he was 13 years old. His photographic work has been published in numerous books and magazines and his fine art photos have been the subject of many exhibitions. Currently, he teaches digital photography and image editing at Central Oregon Community College, the Cascade Center of Photography, and also various workshops around Oregon and internationally. Samples of his photographic work can be found at his website.

Ralph Delamarter is a Cascade Camera Club Principal and former Deschutes County Library Director.

This ought to be a breathtaking presentation! Don’t miss it!

MEETS

Monday, September 16, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

PRESENTERS

Robert Agli and Ralph Delamarter

Course Manager

Barbara Silversmith

Lectures

Shaping Place in Mesoamerica: Ten Ancient Cities from Olmec to Aztec, Part 1

Wednesdays, September 11, 18, and October 2, 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

A lecture series offered in two parts. Registration is not required.

Part 1: Intro to Mesoamerica, The Olmec, the Mesoamerican Calendar, and Teotihuacan (1400 BC – AD 650)

Part 2 (offered in early 2020): Cities of the Ancient Maya and Aztec (AD 100 – 1521)

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Between 1400 BC and AD 1521, Mesoamerica (the most architecturally-intensive region of North America) was home to thousands of ancient kingdoms and a few metropoli, forged by people from dozens of distinct cultures. Each ancient city had a distinctive visual character. In fact, it could be said that the focus of ancient Mesoamerican architects was on shaping earth or stone to define and manifest the specific qualities and history of a place.

The first part of this course provides an overview of Mesoamerican geography, time periods, and the earliest monumental civilizations of the Americas. Along the way, we will uncover the secrets of the Mesoamerican calendar and examine the sophisticated observational systems of ancient astronomy.

This series of four lectures examines how important cities from different cultures built unique visual identities that reflected their local topography, explained their historical founding and the protection of their patron deities, and linked their location with a recurring astronomical phenomenon.

TOPICS
September 11: Mesoamerica: A Place Apart

This lecture introduces Mesoamerica, one of the six places in the world in which “civilization” developed independently of outside contact.  It was home to North America’s towering pyramids and to the great civilizations of the Aztec, Maya, and other remarkable culture groups.

September 18: The Olmec: Narratives in Earth and Stone (1700 – 400 BC)

By 1700 BC, people in several regions of Mesoamerica were conducting major earth-shaping projects. By 1200, they were creating ceremonial and administrative centers, and carving basalt and jade into a variety of meaningful forms.

October 2: Counting Time/Space to Create Place: The Mesoamerican Calendar

One of the unique features of Mesoamerica was its overlapping calendar systems. To grasp the essence of Mesoamerican thought, one must have a decent sense of the calendar. It regulated everything – from a person’s name and fate, to the unfolding of ritual processions, to the scale of buildings and design of cities. Although the basic calendar cycles were shared by most civilizations, the days and cycles had different names in different cultures. So, get ready to have your mind twisted a bit.

October 9: Teotihuacan: Facts and Mysteries of an Early American Metropolis (200 BC–AD 650)

Around 100 BC, people in the highland Basin of Mexico began to build the largest urban center in the Americas, called Teotihuacan. Not only did it eventually have a population of over 130,000, but it became a cosmopolitan center with enclaves of people from other cultural regions. Despite these and other unsolved questions, the monumental pyramids still stand as testimony of the city’s greatness and power.

We are fortunate to have Bend resident Professor Carolyn E. Tate share her knowledge of the ancient art of the Americas. She curated the Pre-Columbian collection at the Dallas Museum of Art prior to starting her 23-year tenure at Texas Tech University. She has explored most of the major sites in Mesoamerica, with a special interest in the landscapes that surround them and the efforts each city made to create a unique place. Dr. Tate’s two books: Yaxchilan: The Design of a Maya Ceremonial City and Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture: The Unborn, Women, and Creation focus on how Mesoamericans situated their ritual-civic centers in place, history, and cosmology.

MEETS

Wednesdays, September 11, 18, and October 2, 9, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

Courses

Brain Myths Exploded: Lessons from Neuroscience

Tuesdays, August 6–September 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

This summer our science class reaches into the brain in an attempt to put to rest many false ideas about the working brain.  Join Russ Hopper, Larry Weinberg and other OLLI members as they lead us through a fascinating exploration. They are assisted by The Teaching Company’s course, Myths Exploded: Lessons from Neuroscience, presented by Professor Indre Viskontas from the University of California.

As a foundation we keep three key principles of the brain in mind. The first to understand is that the brain is not perfectly designed. The second is that no brain region is an island. Trillions of complex interconnections create the activity of the working brain.  Finally, there are two systems of thought in the brain, one for fast thinking and the other for slower and more rational thought.

We explode popular myths including the bigger your brain, the smarter you are; memory is accurate and objective; senses reflect the world as it exists; dreams have secret meanings, and more. As Dr. Viskontas states, “for all its beauty, the brain can be messy, random, and inefficient. It can be prone to mistakes from the lowest levels of perception to the highest levels of complex decision making.”

Other questions we explore include:

  • How do magicians use the brain’s own weaknesses to convince us of their tricks?
  • How are the brains of men and women different?
  • What is the addictive nature of social media tools like Facebook and Twitter?
  • Do specific neurons play a role in how we socialize with other people?
  • Are brain games and brain foods important to the health of the brain?
TOPICS
  • September 3: Are Other Animals Conscious? Can You Multitask Efficiently?
  • September 10: Are Dreams Meaningful? Can Brain Scans Read Your Mind?
  • September 17: Can Adult Brains Change for the Better? Do Special Neurons Enable Social Life?
  • September 24: Is Your Brain Unprejudiced?  Does Technology Make You Stupid?
MEETS

Tuesdays, August 6 to September 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon 

COURSE MANAGER

Russ Hopper

Study and Discussion Groups

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, September 9, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: Angle of Repose by William Stegner

Retired wheelchair-bound historian Lyman Ward uses the correspondence of his Victorian grandmother, Susan Burling Ward, to create the epic tale of his family’s history in the early American West.  Susan’s letters vividly describe her difficult marriage and the struggles of her husband, Oliver, in his attempts at various engineering and mining schemes over many years.  Susan must adapt to primitive homes in the dust and heat of the far west of the 19th century and constantly contrasts her difficult life to that of her best friend in New York surrounded by literary elites and Eastern culture.

Modern Library ranked Angle of Repose #82 on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century and readers of the San Francisco Chronicle voted it the best 20th–Century novel written about the western United States. In 1972 Wallace Stegner was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for Angle of Repose.

October’s selection: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

Facilitator

Bonnie Corley

Coordinator

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the Month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, September 10, 17, 24, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

LOCATION

Insurance center, 62940 O.B. Riley Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Second building north of McKay Cottage complex – two-story grey building; entrance and parking in the back. Go through the main door and straight to the end of the hall.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday starting September 10, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Carolyn Hammond

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, September 16 and 30, 10:15–11:45 a.m.
LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Registration is not required.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation. 

TOPIC

Selection: Enlightenment Nowby Stephen Pinker

Stephen Pinker's latest book, Enlightenment Now, presents the big picture of human progress: people are living longer, healthier, freer, and happier lives, and while our problems are formidable, the solutions lie in the Enlightenment ideal of using reason and science. (Good Reads)

Pinker tries to get us to step back from the gory headlines of existential threats and prophecies of doom, which play to our psychological biases. Instead, he asks us to follow the data displayed on graphs, showing that life, health, prosperity, safety, peace, knowledge, and happiness are on the rise, not just in the West, but worldwide. This progress is not the result of luck, but a gift of the Enlightenment: the conviction that reason and science can enhance human flourishing.

After presenting the data he discusses many problems such as climate change, nuclear disaster, and terrorism. How serious a threat are they and what can be done about them?

Pinker's views and recommendations should stimulate a lively discussion.

October’s selection: Strangers in Their Own Land by Arlie Hochsheld

FACILITATOR

Kathryn Cullen and Tom Carrol

Coordinator

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month*, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

(*Because of Labor Day the group will meet on Mondays, September 16 and 30)

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, September 30, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Our monthly film series offers members an opportunity to understand and enjoy film as an art form, in a deeper and more fulfilling way. We view films from a variety of genres selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production are presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards. Group members share their individual perceptions of what the screenwriter and director attempt to convey to the audience.

TOPIC

Twelve Angry Men (1957) 1 hr. 36 min.

Cast: Martin Balsam, Lee J. Cobb, E. G. Marshall, Henry Fonda

Director: Sidney Lumet

Screenplay: Reginald Rose

A jury of twelve men must decide if a young defendant is guilty or innocent of murdering his father.  Eleven of the jurors vote for conviction; the twelfth attempts to prevent a miscarriage of justice by forcing the others to reconsider the guilty verdict, stressing reasonable doubt.

Twelve Angry Men was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Director, Best Picture, and Best Writing of Adapted Screenplay and was remade for television in 1997.

Facilitator

Roger Aikin

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, September 5, noon–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant
Cascade Village Shopping Center
63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Member Kathryn Cullen will be making reservations for this month’s luncheon. Let her know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Kathryn’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

Hood River-Columbia Gorge Tour

Tuesday, September 3–Thursday, September 5, 2019 (two-night/three-day option)

Registration is closed.

Registration required and closes August 15. This trip is limited to 20 participants. Signed field trip waivers required before departure.

description

A terrific multi-day OLLI-UO field trip to Hood River has been planned by member Marcia Stone from Tuesday, September 3 through Thursday, September 5, with the option to stay an additional day. Please see below for the hotel information, itinerary, and description of activities that have been planned. Registration begins early so that members have time to plan! You may register for three, or the full four, days. You may alternately attend just Friday's train trip and make it one long day trip from Bend. This event is estimated to cost about $750 to $800 for the full three-night, four-day trip including lodging, activities (museum entrance fees and train trip), and food. The suggested hotel for this trip is the Best Western PLUS Hood River Inn, located at exit 64 off of I-84. Information about for this hotel is below.

HOTEL reservations

The suggested hotel for this trip is the Best Western PLUS Hood River Inn, where favorable rates have been secured under the group name OLLI – University of Oregon. The group ID is OLLI. Hotel information is as follows:

Best Western PLUS Hood River Inn

1108 East Marine Way
Hood River, OR, 97031

Secured Rates under OLLI–University of Oregon:

Room Type Rate per Night: Tues, Weds, Thurs Check-In and Check-Out
Riverview 2 Queen $212 single/$212 double per night 09/03–09/06/19
Non-view 2 Queen Upper $185 single/$185 double per night 09/03–09/06/19
Non-view King $176 single/$176 double per night 09/03–09/06/19
Riverview King $202 single/$202 double per night 09/03–09/06/19

*Rates are listed for two people per room. Additional rate per person is $15.00 All rates are subject to applicable tax (currently at 9.8%).

*All rooms have microwaves and mini refrigerators. Complimentary breakfast is included.

To book a room, please call the hotel directly at 1-800-828-7873 and identify yourself as a member of the OLLI – University of Oregon group or book online using this specific link that has the group rates. All rooms must be reserved by 08/15/19 to receive the rates above.

Participants may make other arrangements if they so desire. Please note: members need to reserve their own hotel room(s). Hotel reservations are not included with the registration through UO.

itinerary
Day 1: Tuesday September 3, 2019

8:00 a.m. Leave Bend

9:45 a.m. Arrive Timberline Lodge

11:00 a.m. Guided tour by USFS or Volunteer

11:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Lunch at Rams Head at Timberline (lunch deli style)

1:10 p.m. Depart Timberline Lodge for Odell, Oregon tour

2:00 p.m. Arrive at Diamond Fruit Company

3515 Chevron Dr., Odell, OR (left off Highway 35 to Hood River)

Guided tours (Bob Wymoor)

4:00–5:00 p.m. Arrive Best Western Plus Hood River Inn*

1108 East Marine Way, Hood River, OR (exit 64)

*Individual reservations with the Inn required prior to trip.

6:00 p.m. Dinner at Hood River Inn Restaurant: Riverside

Day 2: Wednesday September 4, 2019

7:30 a.m. Breakfast at Hood River Inn (complimentary with room)

9:00 a.m. Arrive at Bonneville Dam, Fish Hatchery and Sturgeon Pond

90543 NE Herman Loop, I-84 West exit 40, Self-Guided Tour

11:30–11:45 a.m.  Arrive at Multnomah Falls, I-84, Exit 31

Noon Lunch at Multnomah Falls Lodge

1:30 p.m. Guided Tour of Lodge

Option 1: Return to Hood River via Columbia Gorge Historical Highway

Option 2: Return to Hood River and explore downtown Hood River wineries

7:00 p.m. Dinner at Mesquitery

1219 12th St, Hood River, OR

Day 3: Thursday September 5, 2019

Free morning to explore on your own. Art Walk is happening in the marina area

11:30 a.m.–noon Lunch at Solstice

501 Portway Ave, Hood River, OR

1:30 p.m. Arrive at WAAAM, Western Antique Auto & Air Museum

1600 Air Museum Rd, Hood River, OR

541-308-1600

(cost $16 or $14 for over 65 or Veteran)

2:00 p.m. Talk on restoration

5:00 p.m. Return to Bend (if not staying through Friday)

Day 4 (Optional): Friday, September 6, 2019

10:15 a.m. Arrive at Mt. Hood Historic Train Depot

110 Railroad St., Hood River, OR

$5 per car parking fee.

($55 for wine tasting trip to Parkdale – details of excursion here)

11:00 a.m. Departure on train: trip is 4.5 hours.

We can bring our own food, snacks, drinks. Can purchase box lunch at train station before boarding train.

Get off train for 1 hour in Parkdale.

There is a $1 museum admission. There is also a restaurant there where food may be purchased.

Approximately 5:30 p.m. Return to Hood River Train Depot, Depart for Bend
coordinator

Members who have questions or want further clarification should request coordinator Marcia Stone’s contact info from osher@uoregon.edu.

Fall Picnic and All-Member Potluck

Sunday, September 22, noon–2:00 p.m.
location

Ponderosa Park shelter

225 SE 15th St, Bend, OR 97702

details

Say goodbye to summer and extend a big welcome to fall and another season of OLLI offerings. We’ll meet at the Ponderosa Park shelter for a great potluck with plenty of friends! Please sign up to bring either a main dish or a dessert of your choice. Write what you plan to bring on the sign-up sheet at the Elks Lodge or Deschutes Historical Museum, or let our new hospitality chair Margie de Leon know what you plan to bring. Margie’s email address can be obtained by emailing osher@uoregon.edu. We ask that you register so that we can get a headcount for a lively get-together. Spouses/guests are welcome!

Please note that we ask members to register through the UO system and share what they plan to bring with the sign-up sheet.

New Member Welcome

Wednesday, September 25, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
location

Deschutes Historical Museum

129 NW Idaho Ave, Bend, OR 97703

description

For all those OLLI-UO members who just joined in the past few months or those who have not been to a New Member Welcome, please join us on Wednesday, September 25. The Welcome is a great way to get to know fellow new members and members of the Governing Council. We share experiences and helpful hints on how to best maximize your OLLI-UO experience. We ask that you sign up by Monday, September 23, so that we have a headcount. We look forward to getting to know you!

Coming in October

First Friday Art Walk

Friday, October 4, 2:00–5:00 p.m.

Member Kathryn Cullen has arranged a fun first Friday art walk field trip to three art galleries in Bend on First Friday, October 4. Participants will complete the visit before the galleries will be welcoming other visitors to their gallery at 5:00 p.m. so it will not be too crowded with non-OLLI visitors. Participants will meet at Red Chair Gallery (103 NW Oregon) for our first visit. The itinerary is as follows:

At each gallery, we will have one or two artists present to describe their work and their process, allowing time for Q&A. The gallery owner will also take a few minutes at the beginning to describe the gallery mission and introduce the artists.

Registration is required and the field trip is limited to 15 attendees. Participants will all meet at Red Chair Gallery promptly at 2:00 p.m. then will walk to the other two galleries. The three galleries are within a half mile of each other.

*If the field trip is full and/or you are interested in future art walks, please ask to be added to the waitlist for this class so that we can compile an email list and coordinate two groups in the future.

Any questions can be answered by field trip coordinator Kathryn Cullen. You may obtain Kathryn’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!


Archive

An archive of previous courses and activities is available.

2018 courses and activities archive

2019 courses and activities archive

 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon