Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon Courses and Activities

Current Central Oregon course offerings are listed below. Course and activity descriptions for the following month will be published mid-month. Minor edits of topics and facilitators will be updated at the end of the month.

Members will be notified of monthly updates and critical changes via email. We encourage you to check both the course and activity descriptions and the course calendar at the middle and end of the month! Important announcements, like the President's Note and other notifications, will be published as information is available (up to twice per month).

June 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured in June

Field Trip to Paulina Cattle Ranch

Thursday, June 13, 7:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Photograph of cows in a pasture.

Central Oregon is cattle country! Join Ray Sessler, a lifelong Oregonian and Prineville rancher, for a tour of his cattle operation in the Paulina area about 60 miles east of Prineville on Highway 380. Discover the commitment that ranching requires!

Ray Sessler was born and raised in Klamath Falls and, along with his wife, Bonnie, has ranched in Crook County for 36 years. They operate and own two ranches, encompassing 16,000 acres and also run an adjoining ranch of 18,000 acres under long-term lease 16 miles east of Prineville. Ray has been active with Oregon Cattlemen’s Association for many years and held the office of President in 2014/2015.

Ray details the organization of his ranches and the planning and decision-making that goes into their successful operation. He is open to any question about his ranch and the cattle industry in general.

This is a full day event due to the two-hour drive to and from his ranch. The itinerary (subject to modification) is as follows:

7:30 a.m. Leave the UOBC parking lot

8:30 a.m. Meet Ray Sessler in Prineville

10:30 a.m. Travel 70 miles to Paulina ranch

10:30 a.m.–noon Ranch tour (Ray can supply 4 vehicles to accommodate 16 people)

noon–1:00 p.m. Lunch will be provided (beef–no chicken)

1:00–2:30 p.m. Continue ranch tour

4:00–4:30 p.m. Return to Prineville

5:30 p.m. Return to UOBC

Expect to do some walking on unpaved surfaces typical of a cattle ranch. Wear shoes that are comfortable and good for walking, although we will not be walking more than short distances. Wear comfortable clothing, including rain gear, if rain is in the forecast. Bring water and any snack you would like.

Registration is required with a minimum of 15 people needed for the field trip. Because of this, registration will open mid-May. Signed field trip waivers are required before departure. Because of the great distances involved, we are asking those who are carpooling to contribute $15 to help drivers with gas.

COORDINATOR

Russ Hopper

Pine Mountain Wildflower Hike/Walk

Friday, June 28, 1:00–5:00 p.m.

Registration opens June 5. Watch your email for the announcement.

Don’t put it off this year! Get out and enjoy Central Oregon spring wildflowers before they are gone!

Charmane Powers, US Forest Service botanist, leads a wildflower walk/hike at Pine Mountain, 30 miles southeast of Bend on our last Friday in June. The area has a rare, found only in Oregon, green-tinged paintbrush (Castilleja chlorotica), as well as a robust suite of other interesting plant species.

Since 1989, Charmane Powers has been first a wildlife biologist and then a botanist with the US Forest Service, working on the Deschutes National Forest in Bend. She is currently the District Botanist on the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District.

Our group will be able to hike a short distance from the parking area to begin viewing wildflowers. The excursion will require 60 to 90 minutes of slow walking and a very limited amount of non-strenuous hiking.

Wear your walking/hiking shoes and bring water, snacks, and your wildflower book to add to the enjoyment. This wildflower walk/hike is designed to accommodate as many OLLI members as possible who do not have the ability to do long hiking.

Participants will meet at the UO Bend Center at 12:45 p.m. to arrange carpools ahead of a 1:00 departure. Signed field trip waivers are required. We expect to arrive back at UOBC around 5:00 p.m.

If you are interested in the evening events at Pine Mountain Observatory, you can stay for a donation of $5. We suggest bringing a picnic dinner and headlight for attendance at those events. Visit the Pine Mountain Observatory website for more information. The observatory is operated by the University of Oregon Department of Physics under a special use permit from the Deschutes National Forest.

Coordinators

Gary Whiteaker and Fran Stevenson

Courses

What Darwin Didn’t Know: The Modern Science of Evolution

Tuesdays, April 9–June 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Registration is not required.

ABOUT THIS COURSE

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Explore breakthroughs and unanticipated discoveries in the field of genetics since the time of Darwin. OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Russ Hopper examines evolution as the fundamental concept in all of biology, explaining the complex biodiversity of earth, while spawning new disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, and evolutionary medicine.

Russ augments his discussions with videos and articles from the internet and What Darwin Didn’t Know: The Modern Science of Evolution (Great Courses) by Scott Solomon, PhD, Associate Teaching Professor at Rice University. Dr. Solomon teaches ecology, evolutionary biology, and scientific communication. He received his PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior from The University of Texas at Austin, where his research explored the evolutionary origins of biodiversity in the Amazon basin.

TOPICS
  • June 4: Coevolution: Peace Accords and Arms Races; Microbiomes: Evolution with Small Partners. Facilitator: John Dulzo
  • June 11: The Evolution of Brains and Behavior; The Evolution of Sex and Parenting; The Evolution of Aging and Death. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg
  • June 18: Evolutionary Medicine; Gene Editing and Directed Evolution; The Future of Human Evolution. Facilitator: Larry Weinberg

Please note: The June sessions have been modified slightly to accommodate our last w The last two sessions encompass three lectures.

meets

Tuesdays, April 9–June 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

course manager/facilitator

Russ Hopper

Food: A Cultural Culinary History

Wednesdays, February 13–June 19, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is no longer required; any member is welcome to attend.

focus

First offered two years ago in winter 2017, this course was so popular that we are doing a back-by-popular-demand repeat. Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate a deeply insightful lens on human history, shedding new light on the evolution of social and political systems, on cultural interactions, economic empires, human migrations, and more. In the process, you discover the stunning richness of world cultures as seen in their distinctive food traditions, and greatly broaden your own enjoyment of fine food.

The scope of this course is global, covering civilizations of Asia, America, Africa, and Europe and how cultures in each of these continents domesticated unique staples that literally enabled these civilizations to expand and flourish. The result is a compelling inquiry that will change the way you look at both history and food itself.

topics
  • June 5: Immigrant Cuisines and Ethnic Restaurants; War, Nutritionism, and the Great Depression. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • June 12: World War II and the Advent of Fast Food; Counterculture—From Hippies to Foodies. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • June 19: Science of New Dishes and New Organisms; The Past as Prologue? Facilitator: Pat Ackley
meets

Wednesdays, February 13–June 19, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session II (last session)

Fridays, February 8–June 7, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required for this repeat session; all members are welcome to attend.

about this course

Due to overwhelming popularity and extremely high demand, we are now offering a repeat session of The Vikings! Course Manager Terry Schwab invites members to bring their knowledge of topics and participate in a lively discussion.

FOCUS

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. The second session of this 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and who’s brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today.

  • June 7: From Vikings to Crusaders; The Viking Legacy
meets

Fridays, February 8–June 7, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Terry Schwab

Study and Discussion Groups

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, June 4, and 11, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

*Please note: our Writers’ Bloc participants are taking a hiatus from meeting in a formal classroom from June 18 until the end of August. We will resume meeting at a facility again in September 2019. For more details, please ask for Carolyn Hammond's contact information from our support staff at osher@uoregon.edu.

COURSE MANAGER

Carolyn Hammond

Spring Tonic—Refreshing Ideas from TED Talks

Thursdays, March 14–June 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

Treat yourself to new ideas on ten different topics from TED talks, a clearinghouse of ideas from the world’s most inspired thinkers connecting with us, a community of the curious. The intent of TED (an acronym for technology, entertainment, and design) is to give us a deeper understanding of this world, with the belief that the power of ideas can change attitudes, lives, and ultimately, our world.

focus

Join facilitators Barbara Silversmith and Thom Larson Thursday afternoons to share your perception of these new ideas in discussions after each TED talk.

TOPICS

June 6: The Quest for Truth

MEETS

Thursdays, March 14–June 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

This group will resume meeting at a new facility in July. Location details and discussion topics to follow.

COURSE MANAGERS

Thom Larson and Barbara Silversmith

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, June 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant
Cascade Village Shopping Center
63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. If you are able to attend please contact coordinator Barbara Jordan. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

May 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured in May

Editing Digital Photographs

Fridays, May 3, 10, and 17, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

Would you like to increase your skills in editing digital photographs? Would you like to improve the digital images you receive from your family and friends or perhaps create something imaginative or artistic with your photos? Join our own OLLI member, John Rhetts, for this three-session class where you learn to THINK your way through improving your digital images, whether from your smartphone or your stand-alone camera.

Learn how to apply seven ideas to editing digital images using Adobe Photoshop Elements and by extension the software that is already in your mobile devices and home computer. The focus for these three Friday sessions is on improving and editing the pictures you already have, not on how to take a good photo or operate your camera. No memorization and no math is required. These sessions are not technical.

At the end of this course, up to six members may begin a new OLLI-UO Shared Interest Group (SIG) to practice new skills on their own photographs.

Topics in Art History: Seventh and Final Talk

Friday, May 24, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
Illustration of Marie Antoinette with boat hat.

Registration is not required. This talk is the final lecture in the series, originally scheduled for February 28, 2019.

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aikin, PhD, is a retired professor of art history from the University of Omaha, Nebraska. He hand-selected seven topics to present to our members about which he had written and studied for years. Each talk considered an issue or aspect of art history, with interesting artwork and issues that relate to the present day. Because of the weather in Central Oregon, his final talk had to be postponed until this month. There will be plenty of time for discussion during and after the presentation. No particular preparation or reading is required to attend, although Roger will have suggestions for further reading and research for those who wish to follow up. The talk is self-sufficient.

the unfashionable human body through the ages in art, fashion, and pop culture

This talk is a romp through the history of representations of the human body from Egypt to Luke Skywalker. What is “beauty” anyway, and why has the human body been represented so differently at different times?

Courses

What Darwin Didn’t Know: The Modern Science of Evolution

Tuesdays, April 9–June 25, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Registration is not required.

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

FOCUS

Explore breakthroughs and unanticipated discoveries in the field of genetics since the time of Darwin. OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Russ Hopper examines evolution as the fundamental concept in all of biology, explaining the complex biodiversity of earth, while spawning new disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, and evolutionary medicine.

Russ augments his discussions with videos and articles from the internet and What Darwin Didn’t Know: The Modern Science of Evolution (Great Courses) by Scott Solomon, PhD, Associate Teaching Professor at Rice University. Dr. Solomon teaches ecology, evolutionary biology, and scientific communication. He received his PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior from The University of Texas at Austin, where his research explored the evolutionary origins of biodiversity in the Amazon basin.

Since Darwin’s time, new discoveries include:

  • The discovery of the rules of heredity
  • The identification of DNA as the carrier of genetic information
  • Fossil discoveries that fill major evolutionary gaps and offer new insights
  • The recognition of multiple mass extinctions in Earth’s history
  • The ability to read the genetic code of any organism
  • The power to manipulate genetic material
TOPICS
  • April 16: Genome Mutations: Evolution's Raw Material; Gene Flow versus Natural Selection
  • April 23: Geology and Genes: The Geography of Life; Genetic Drift: When Evolution Is Random
  • April 30: Rapid Evolution within Species; Evolution in the Lab
  • May 7: The Many Origins of Species; Cambrian Explosion to Dinosaur Extinction
  • May 14: Reconstructing the Tree of Life with DNA; Human Evolution in All Directions
  • May 21: Evolution Doesn't Repeat, but It Rhymes; The Evolution of Extreme Life
  • May 28: Imperfect Nature: Ad Hoc Body Designs; The Sterile Worker Paradox
  • June 4: Coevolution: Peace Accords and Arms Races; Microbiomes: Evolution with Small Partners
  • June 11: The Evolution of Brains and Behavior; The Evolution of Sex and Parenting
  • June 18: The Evolution of Aging and Death; Evolutionary Medicine
  • June 25: Gene Editing and Directed Evolution; The Future of Human Evolution
meets

Tuesdays, April 9–June 25, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

course manager/facilitator

Russ Hopper

Food: A Cultural Culinary History

Wednesdays, February 13–June 19, 10:00 a.m.–noon
about this course

Registration is no longer required; any member is welcome to attend.

focus

First offered two years ago in winter 2017, this course was so popular that we are doing a back-by-popular-demand repeat. Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate a deeply insightful lens on human history, shedding new light on the evolution of social and political systems, on cultural interactions, economic empires, human migrations, and more. In the process, you discover the stunning richness of world cultures as seen in their distinctive food traditions, and greatly broaden your own enjoyment of fine food.

The scope of this course is global, covering civilizations of Asia, America, Africa, and Europe and how cultures in each of these continents domesticated unique staples that literally enabled these civilizations to expand and flourish.

A 36-lecture/18-week Great Courses DVD series featuring award-winning Professor Ken Albala of the University of the Pacific contributes to the adventure, aiding us in discovering fascinating food lore and culture of all regions and eras—as an eye-opening lesson in history as well as a unique window on what we eat today. The result is a compelling inquiry that will change the way you look at both history and food itself.

  • The revolutions of agriculture
  • Food and faith
  • 1492 and food globalization
  • Coffee, tea, sugar, and slaves
  • Eating in the Industrial Revolution
  • Big business and food imperialism
topics
  • April 17: 1492–Globalization & Fusion Cuisines; 16th-Century Manners and Reformation Diets. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • April 24: Papal Rome & the Spanish Golden Age; The Birth of French Haute Cuisine. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • May 1: Elizabethan England, Puritans, Country Food; Dutch Treat–Coffee, Tea, Sugar, Tobacco. Facilitator: Terry Schwab
  • May 8: African and Aboriginal Cuisines; Edo, Japan Samurai Dining and Zen Aesthetics. Facilitator: Linda Redeker
  • May 15: Colonial Cookery in North America; Eating in the Early Industrial Revolution. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • May 22: Romantics, Vegetarians, Utopians; First Restaurants, Chefs and Gastronomy. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • May 29: Big Business and the Homogenization of Food; Food Imperialism around the World. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • June 5: Immigrant Cuisines and Ethnic Restaurants; War, Nutritionism, and the Great Depression. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • June 12: World War II and the Advent of Fast Food; Counterculture—From Hippies to Foodies. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • June 19: Science of New Dishes and New Organisms; The Past as Prologue? Facilitator: Pat Ackley
meets

Wednesdays, February 13–June 19, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Pat Ackley

Imperial Russia: Land of the Czars

Wednesdays, March 6–May 22, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
about this course

Registration is closed, but we have seats available for those who are interested and did not register ahead of time.

focus

First offered three years ago in February 2016, this course was so popular that our own resident expert on Russia, Professor Emeritus Bob Harrison, PhD, offers a repeat of this series. Join Bob for an eight-week examination of Imperialist Czarist Russia, including background to its organization in Kiev, its revival in Moscow and evolution from a small principality to Eurasian conquest.

The course covers the great czars including Ivan III, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Alexander I, and Nicholas II, from the 10th Century to the 1917 Revolution. Discussions on history, religion, culture and geography are covered in depth.

The History Channel DVD Russia – Land of the Tsars augment the lectures.

OLLI member Bob Harrison taught European and Middle Eastern history at Southern Oregon University for 25 years, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, Alexander the Great, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Ancient Western Civilizations, and Imperial Russia.

TOPICS
  • April 24: Alexander I and Napoleonic Wars 1801-25. Philosophic Czar, Clash with Napoleon, Treaty of Tilst, Continental System, Invasion of 1812. End of Napoleon, Congress of Vienna, Peacemaking Czar, Holy Alliance, Mysterious Ending.
  • May 1: High Noon: The Nineteenth Century 1825-1881. Plight of Nicholas I, Decembrist Revolt 1825, Crimean War 1854-56, Russia’s Containment. Alexander II and Reform, Emancipation of the Serfs, Assassination. Congress of Berlin 1878, No Warm Water Port.
  • May 8: Sunset on Autocracy: Last of the Romanovs 1881-1914. Alexander III and Nicholas II, League of the Three Emperors, the French Alliance 1893, Socialists and Bolsheviks, Russo-Japanese War, Revolution of 1905.
  • May 22: Russia in the First World War 1914-1917.  Bosnian Crisis 1909, Alliance System, Sarajevo June 28, 1914. Slaughter on Russian Front, Brusilov Offensive, Political Collapse of Nicholas II, February Revolution, October Revolution, Execution of the Romanovs.
meets

Select Wednesdays, March 6–May 22, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

course manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session I

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon
about this course

Registration is no longer required; any member is welcome to attend.

focus

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans. Course Manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI-UO members will facilitate this course.

As explorers and traders, the Vikings played a decisive role in the formation of Latin Christendom, and particularly of Western Europe. In this course, we study the Vikings not only as warriors, but also in other roles for which they were equally extraordinary: merchants, artists, kings, raiders, seafarers, shipbuilders, and creators of a remarkable literature of myths and sagas.

Among the topics we explore in depth are the profound influence of the Norse gods and heroes on Viking culture, and the Vikings' extraordinary accomplishments as explorers and settlers in Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. With the help of archeological findings, we learn to analyze Viking ship burials, runestones and runic inscriptions, Viking woodcarving, jewelry, sculpture, and metalwork.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today.

topics
  • April 18: Swedes in the Baltic Sea & Russia; The Road to Byzantium. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
  • April 25: From Varangians into Russians; Transformation of Scandinavian Society. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
  • May 2: Saint Anskar and the First Christian Missions; Formation of the Kingdom of Denmark. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • May 9: Cnut the Great; Collapse of Cnut’s Empire. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • May 16: Jarls and Sea Kings of Norway; St. Olaf of Norway. Facilitator: Tom Machala
  • May 23: Kings of the Swedes and Goths; Christianization and Economic Change. Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • May 30: From Vikings to Crusaders; The Viking Legacy. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
meets

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session II

Fridays, February 8–June 7, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required for this repeat session; all members are welcome to attend.

about this course

Due to overwhelming popularity and extremely high demand, we are now offering a repeat session of The Vikings! Course Manager Terry Schwab invites members to bring their knowledge of topics and participate in a lively discussion.

This repeat session will start the 18-week course from the beginning, effective February 8, 2019. This means it will be on a different schedule and slightly behind the Thursday session of this course. Members previously registered for the Thursday session may switch to this one, if they so wish. We ask that members commit to attending the session for which they are registered, so that we can control our occupancy.

FOCUS

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. The second session of this 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today. (full description is above in session 1)

topics
  • April 19: Skaldic Poetry and Sagas; Western Voyages to Greenland and Vinland
  • April 26: Swedes in the Baltic Sea and Russia; The Road to Byzantium
  • May 3: From Varangians into Russians; Transformation of Scandinavian Society
  • May 10: Saint Anskar and the First Christian Missions; Formation of the Kingdom of Denmark
  • May 17: Cnut the Great; Collapse of Cnut’s Empire
  • May 24: Jarls and Sea Kings of Norway; St. Olaf of Norway
  • May 31: Kings of the Swedes and Goths; Christianization and Economic Change
  • June 7: From Vikings to Crusaders; The Viking Legacy
meets

Fridays, February 8–June 7, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Terry Schwab

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, May 6 and 20, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

TOPIC

Selection: The Library Book by Susan Orlean

The Library Book is a book for every reader and every writer. It’s a masterful tribute to libraries, and—even better—it has a plot and a storyline.

On April 29, 1986, a fire consumed or damaged more than a million books in the main branch of the Los Angeles Public Library. The fire that nearly destroys a collection, leads Orleans to histories of libraries and Los Angeles and to an exploration of the physics of how a book burns. There’s a suspected arsonist at the center of the story, but the hero is the library along with its collections of books, maps, menus, autographs and marionettes. (review from The National Book Review)

On May 20 (our second meeting for the month), the group welcomes Graham Fox, Adult Services Community Librarian at Deschutes Public Library in Redmond. He discusses the history of the Deschutes Public Library building and the similarities and differences between it and the Los Angeles County Library building. Public librarians deal with homeless visitors, community outreach, security, fire concerns, streaming books, the many needs of patrons in the electronic age and so much more. Don’t miss a great discussion!

facilitator

Rod Charny

meets

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

*Please note: our book groups opt to take a hiatus during the summer months of June, July, and August. We will resume meeting again in September 2019. Location TBD.

COURSE MANAGER

Joyce Pickersgill

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, May 7, 14, 21, and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

*Please note: our Writers’ Bloc participants opt to meet at various members’ houses during the summer months of June, July, and August. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu to obtain Carolyn Hammond’s email address for summer info. We will resume meeting again at a facility again in September 2019.

COURSE MANAGER

Carolyn Hammond

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, May 13, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is not required.

about this group

A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPIC

Selection: Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively

“I'm writing a history of the world,” Claudia Hampton tells her nurse as she lies alone, old, and very ill in a hospital bed. She has lived a strong, independent life; but the history she weaves is really of her own life, including memories of an haunting affair in Egypt during World War II. Tiger Moon by Penelope Lively won the prestigious British Booker Prize and is written by one of England's foremost contemporary authors, who, herself, studied modern history at Oxford University. The Boston Globe calls this "[a] powerful, moving, and beautifully wrought novel about the ways in which lives are molded by personal memory and the collective past.”

FACILITATOR

Karen Hill

MEETS

Second Mondays of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

*Please note: our book groups opt to take a hiatus during the summer months of June, July, and August. We will resume meeting again in September 2019. Location TBD.

COURSE MANAGER

Deb Hollens

Spring Tonic—Refreshing Ideas from TED Talks

Thursdays, May 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

Treat yourself to new ideas on ten different topics from TED talks, a clearinghouse of ideas from the world’s most inspired thinkers connecting with us, a community of the curious. The intent of TED (an acronym for technology, entertainment, and design) is to give us a deeper understanding of this world, with the belief that the power of ideas can change attitudes, lives, and ultimately, our world.

focus

Join facilitators Barbara Silversmith and Thom Larson Thursday afternoons to share your perception of these new ideas in discussions after each TED talk.

TOPICS
April 25: no class (New Member Welcome)
May 2: Creativity
May 9: Artistry in Forms
May 16: End of Life
May 23: The Magic of Art
May 30: Learning
June 6: The Quest for Truth
MEETS

Thursdays, March 14–June 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

COURSE MANAGERS

Thom Larson and Barbara Silversmith

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, May 20, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Registration is not required.

about this group

Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

TOPIC

Some Like It Hot (1959) 2 hours 1 minute

Cast: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon

Director: Billy Wilder

Screenplay: Billy Wilder, I.A.L. Diamond

One of the greatest comedies of all time, Some Like It Hot is a hilarious screwball romp, the highest-grossing comedy up to its time. 

Two down-on-their-luck, struggling jazz musicians are on the run from the mob. After witnessing the St. Valentine's Day Massacre in Prohibition-Era Chicago, they dress in drag and get two weeks of work in an all-girl band on the way to Florida. Many comic complications follow as one falls in love with the singer in the band (Marilyn Monroe) while trying to remain in disguise and the other is courted by an aging millionaire.

Some Like It Hot received six Academy Award nominations including Best Actor (Jack Lemmon), Best Director, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Black and White Cinematography, and Best Black and White Art Direction/Set Decoration, winning the Oscar for Best Costume Design. “It was voted as the top comedy film by the American Film Institute on their list on AFI's 100 Years...100 Laughs poll in 2000, and was selected as the best comedy of all time in a poll of 253 film critics from 52 countries conducted by the BBC in 2017.” (information from Wikipedia)

FACILITATOR and course manager

Bonnie Campbell

MEETS

Third Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

*Please note: our Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film group takes a break during the summer months. Instead, we offer summer documentaries on a weekly basis starting in July. Documentary titles and location details to come.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, May 2, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant
Cascade Village Shopping Center
63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Let coordinator Barbara Jordan know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

All-Member Meeting "Meet and Munch!"

Wednesday, May 15, noon–1:00 p.m.

Come to our monthly all-member meeting and update on the move. OLLI-UO Central Oregon President Suzanne Butterfield will address the search for a new OLLI-UO in Central Oregon facility, update members on progress in meeting the Financial Sustainability Plan goals, and take questions and suggestions from members.

Field Trip to Smith Rock State Park

Friday, May 31, 1:00–5:00 p.m.

Explore the geology of Smith Rock State Park and get an inside view of the park's rich cultural and natural history. Instructor David Vick guides us to a deeper understanding of the dramatic geological events that created the spectacular formations. Identify the types and sources of igneous rocks in the park and their role in the Smith Rock landscapes we see today.

David Vick earned his bachelor's and master's degrees from Southern Oregon University. His entire science teaching career has been in Madras. Since retiring, he has obtained certification as an OSU Master Naturalist and has been the interpretive naturalist at Smith Rock State Park for the past four seasons.

Carpooling is encouraged due to limited parking.  We will meet at the UO Bend to arrange carpools and drivers at 1:00 p.m. Once at the park, we will convene at the Welcome Center Yurt. There is a pay station there that dispenses the $5.00 day-use parking fee, or parking is free with a valid State Park pass.

ADA parking spaces are next to the yurt. There is only a short walk from the parking lot with no additional walking. David’s presentation will go from 2:00–4:00 p.m. We plan to be back to UOBC by 5:00 p.m.

Bonnie Campbell is the coordinator for this field trip. Registration is required and is limited to 18 participants. Signed field trip waivers are required before departure.


Archive

An archive of previous courses and activities is available.

2018 courses and activities archive

2019 courses and activities archive

 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon