Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

OLLI-UO suspended due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic

In-person OLLI-UO programming is on hiatus in both Central Oregon and Eugene/Springfield. Online learning opportunities are available. Email osher@uoregon.edu for more information. Read more...

Central Oregon Program Schedule

Current Central Oregon program offerings are listed below. Select each title listed below to see the full class or activity description. Visit the calendar page if you prefer viewing offerings in a calendar format. A list of current Shared Interest Groups can be found on the SIGs page. An archive of past offerings can be viewed in the archive.

Online Lectures

Offered as series or stand-alone sessions, these dynamic presentations are typically taught by university faculty, community experts, and OLLI-UO members. The lecture format consists of a presentation followed by lively discussion. The following lectures are offered virtually.

Jan Vermeer and Han van Meegeren: The Master and the Forger

Wednesday, May 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

FOCUS

OLLI-UO in Central Oregon member Roger Aikin, PhD, is a retired professor of Art History from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He has offered to present a lecture to our members that he gave in January 2020. This talk considers an issue or aspect of art history, with interesting artworks and issues that relate to the present day. There will be plenty of time for discussion during and after the presentation.

TOPIC

We tell two stories: the careers of Jan Vermeer of Delft, who is now regarded as one of the greatest artists of all time; and Han Van Meegeren, who made a career faking the works of Vermeer, and was finally caught. This talk also examines forgeries and fakes of some other artists like Michelangelo and Pollock, as well as fake wine, music, and books. Finally, we ask a larger question that seems especially relevant today: why are we—and the experts—so easy to deceive?

PRESENTER

Roger Aikin

MEETS

Wednesday, May 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Geography of Tea

Tuesday, May 19, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

FOCUS

The Geography of Tea traces the global spread of Camellia sinensis to become the world's second most consumed beverage, cultivated from Orkney to Argentina, Africa to Asia. Along with tea’s transformative impact on world history, this talk focuses on the American experience and how to grow and process your own.

PRESENTER

Susan Walcott is a Professor of Geography Emerita at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, and formerly at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Research interests concern regional economic development, particularly in rapidly transitioning areas throughout Asia. Books, chapters and articles focus on high technology parks and industry clusters (life science, furniture, tea) across the U.S. and China, modernization in Bhutan, and immigrant entrepreneurs.

MEETS

May 19, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

A Sunday Walk in Rome

Thursday, May 28, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

FOCUS

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aikin, PhD, is a retired professor of Art History from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He has offered to present a lecture to Central Orgon and Eugene/Springfield members that he gave in February 2020. This talk considers an issue or aspect of art history, with interesting artworks and issues that relate to the present day. There will be plenty of time for discussion during and after the presentation.

TOPIC

Roger has lived in Rome several times, and this talk is a rambling stroll to some of the famous, not-so-famous, and downright strange places he has encountered in this layer-cake of a city. The Romans have a saying: "Roma: non basta una vita" (Rome: a lifetime is not enough).

PRESENTER

Roger Aikin

MEETS

Thursday, May 28, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

The Mystery of Dark Matter

Tuesday, June 2, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

FOCUS

The presence of dark matter in the universe has intrigued astronomers for well over 100 years, prompting speculation about a substance that emits little or no light but appears to be essential to the structure of the universe. Created in the Big Bang 14 billion years ago, unseen dark matter seems to account for the great majority of the matter in the cosmos.

The study of dark matter has been a conundrum for astrophysicists and elementary particle physicists. Although much has been learned about the gravitational nature of dark matter and its central role in shaping stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and even larger structures in the universe, little has been learned about the properties of dark matter particles.

Join OLLI-UO in Central Oregon member Dr. Larry Price for a talk that will describe what we do know and don’t know about this crucial component of the universe, and will explain how fiercely scientists are working to find out just what dark matter is made of. This lecture is made available to Central Oregon and Eugene/Springfield members since it will be held via Zoom.

PRESENTER

Larry Price is a physicist specializing in elementary particles. He holds degrees in physics from Pomona College (BA) and Harvard University (MA and PhD).  He is retired from a career at Argonne National Laboratory, where he held the rank of senior physicist and was Director of the High Energy Physics Division. He also worked at Columbia University and the U.S. Department of Energy. Dr. Price’s research has included experiments providing early insight into the structure of neutrons and protons; into properties of quarks; evidence for neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass; and the large international effort culminating in the discovery of the Higgs Boson.

MEETS

Tuesday, June 2, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Online Study and Discussion Groups

These groups are designed to be an informal exchange of ideas in a considerate atmosphere. Study groups topics are well-defined and explored in-depth. The following discussion groups are meeting virtually during our in-person hiatus.

Nonfiction Book Group

First and third Mondays, 10:15 a.m.–noon
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation.

TOPICS

April 6 and 20: More from Less by Andrew McAfee

May 4 and 18: Upheaval: Turning Points for Nations in Crisis by Jared Diamond

June 1 and 15: Assault on American Excellence by Anthony Kronman, Facilitated by Steve Hussey

Coordinator

Joyce Pickersgill

MEETS

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Over the course of the year, each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPCIS

April 13: Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout, Facilitated by Karen Hill

May 11: Radetzky March by Joseph Roth, Facilitated by Joyce Pickersgill

June 8: In the Distance by Hernan Diaz, Facilitated by Deb Hollens

Coordinator

Deb Hollens

Meets

Second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Tuesday Afternoon Science Discussion

Two Tuesdays per month: May 12 and 26, June 9 and 23, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
LOCATION

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting various topics in from all areas of science. They explore theories, research, and discuss related ideas and information among group members.

TOPICS

Topics and materials for each week will be posted on the online discussion board. Most members have already been added to the board; if you need assistance, please contact osher@uoregon.edu.

COORDINATORS

Russ Hopper and Elizabeth Polidan

MEETS

Two Tuesdays per month: May 12 and 26, June 9 and 23, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Earth Science and the Environment

Third Thursday of the month, 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Location

Offered via Zoom; the meeting ID will be shared in the Friday e-minder the week prior to the class. Please contact osher@uoregon.edu if you do not receive the meeting information.

FOCUS

For some of us, concern for the Earth’s environment is front and center in our lives. We were in college at a time when environmental activism was born in the U.S. and for some of us, the love of our planet and humanity is as strong as ever. Studies of the Earth’s environment have made major strides in the past few decades due to new sensors, new data, and better models.

TOPICS

The Earth Science and the Environment Discussion Group (ESE) meets once a month for two hours. The content for each meeting is drawn from recent events or developments in Earth science, climate change, and the environment. Each meeting is divided into two segments:

  1. An Advocacy segment where attendees share information or invited guests speak about Earth advocacy organizations, upcoming events, and current issues that may not be widely known, with the goal of increasing awareness of advocacy organizations and opportunities to get involved as individuals.
  2. A Learning segment where attendees or invited guest speakers make technical presentations or lead discussions intended to inform and educate members about environmental data or information, new discoveries, clarification of current environmental issues, dispel misinformation, and many other factors. The goal of this segment is to provide attendees with a better and deeper understanding of the issues facing humanity and our Earth.

The meetings are attendee-driven and designed to maximize the sharing of knowledge between all attendees.

MEETS

Third Thursday of the month, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

coordinators

Suzanne Butterfield and Ron Polidan

Upcoming Offerings

These are offerings that we had planned prior to our unexpected hiatus. Please stay tuned as we plan for returning to in-person programs.

Fun with Movies

First Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.
The last in-person lecture was held March 2, 2020. We are working on a way to offer these lectures virtually.
LOCATION

Possibly offered via Zoom. Details to come.

Focus

Movies are magic! Is it the darkened room…the wide screen . . . the music . . . the popcorn?  Or perhaps it is the opportunity movies grant us to lose ourselves in all kinds of extraordinary experiences that real life can never provide.  Great movies linger in our memories long after the closing credits. They move us to tears, make us laugh, and cause us to think about life in new and different ways.

Join OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aikin for a fascinating series exploring the arts of movie making and the techniques that writers, directors, composers, cinematographers, and editors use to create illusions and manipulate their audience.  Roger taught film studies and has hundreds of digitized film clips to illustrate these topics, many of which should bring back those magic memories. There will be plenty of time for comments and conversation.

Roger received his PhD in Art History from Berkeley and taught for most of his career at Creighton University in Omaha, where he was also the chair of the Fine Arts Department and the director of the University Gallery. He has published books and articles on Renaissance art, American art, photography, and film. He has also exhibited his own photographs.

Join us for this fascinating look at the fine art of movie making!

TOPICS:
  • Monday, January 6: Film Music, part 2. More movie music!
  • Monday, February 3: Narrative and Time In Movies.  How do movies tell stories?  How is time in movies manipulated? Screen time, plot time, and story time.  The “audio/visual contract.”  Unity, closure, and imaginariness.  Direct continuous narrative vs. parallel narratives and flashbacks.  Many examples from famous movies like Citizen Kane, Lawrence of Arabia, and Run Lola Run.
  • Monday, March 2: Cinematography and Editing.  The "Five C's of Cinematography": Camera angles, Continuity, Cutting, Close-ups, and Composition. The fascinating “Kuleshov Effect,” point of view, color and black-and-white, lighting, montage sequences, parallel editing, transitions (graphic matches), and some famous “long takes.” Many examples drawn from Hitchcock to Spielberg.
  • Acting for the Camera:  So you think you can act? The “Eyes” Have it.  Michael Caine on “Acting for the Camera.” Some famous examples of heavy-weight actors and actresses strutting their stuff: Morgan Freeman, Helen Hayes, Tom Hanks, Jack Nicholson, Orson Welles, Gregory Peck, Audrey Hepburn, Donald O’Connor, Bogart, Billy Crystal—too many to name.
  • The Western Movie and the Evolution of the American Hero.  Yee Haw!  This presentation will trace the evolution of the Western from the classic “good vs. evil” paradigm to the more problematic Westerns of recent years.  (Do you remember the Limelighters? “Gunslinger, where did you go wrong? You know in your mind you’re plumb insecure, that killin’ a man is real immature. It is just an attention getting device.”) 
PRESENTER

Roger Aikin

Meets

First Mondays of the month, December 2019 through March 2020, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Turning Points in American History, parts 2 and 3

The remainder of this course will likely resume Fall 2020.
LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Join course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI-UO Central Oregon members for Part II of Turning Points in American History. We relive the most powerful and groundbreaking moments in the fascinating story of the United States of America.

These Great Courses lectures, delivered by Professor Edward T. O'Donnell of College of the Holy Cross, offer a different perspective on the sweeping narrative of U. S. history. Spanning the arrival of the first English colonists to the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks, this course is a captivating and comprehensive tour of those particular moments in the story of America, after which the nation would never be the same again. The topics are covered more from a "cultural history" or "sociology" perspective than traditional (dates, Great Men, etc.).

Whether they took the form of

  • groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts,
  • dramatic military victories and defeats,
  • nationwide social and religious movements, or
  • technological and scientific innovations,

these and other turning points forever changed the character of America politically, socially, culturally, and economically. Sometimes the changes brought about by these events were obvious; sometimes they were more subtle. Sometimes the effects of these turning points were immediate; other times, their aftershocks reverberated for decades.

Regardless, these great historical turning points demand to be understood. Knowing what these events are, how they came about, and their dramatic effects is essential to grasping the full story of this great world power. It may even offer you vital clues as to where America is headed in the coming years and decades.

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members will facilitate this new course.

TOPICS: Part II
  • February 12: 1831 The Righteous Crusade – Abolition; 1844 What’s New? The Communication Revolution. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • February 19: 1845 The Ultimate American Game – Baseball; 1846 Land & Gold – The Mexican War. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • February 26: 1862 Go West, Young Man! The Homestead Act; 1862 Terrible Reality – The Battle of Antietam. Facilitator: Tom Petullo
  • March 4: 1868 Equal Protection – The 14th Amendment; 1872 Terrible Reality – The Battle of Antietam. Facilitator: Leslie Koc
  • March 11: 1873 Bloody Sunday – Ending Reconstruction; 1876 How the West Was Won & Lost – Custer. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • 1886 The First Red Scare – Haymarket; 1898 The End of Isolation – War with Spain. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • 1900 The Promised Land – The Great Migration; 1901 That Damned Cowboy! Theodore Roosevelt. Faciliator: Judy Hurlburt
  • 1903 The Second Transportation Revolution; 1909 The Scourge of the South-Hookworm. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
TOPICS: Part III
  • 1917 Votes for Women! The 19th Amendment; 1919 Strikes & Bombs – The Year of Upheaval. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • 1933 Bold Experimentation – The New Deal; 1939 Einstein’s Letter – The Manhattan Project. Facilitator: Tom Petullo
  • 1942 Surprise – The Battle of Midway; 1945 the Land of Lawns – Suburbanization. Facilitator: Keith Sime
  • 1948 The Berlin Airlift & The Cold War; 1950 Tuning In – The Birth of Television. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • 1960 The Power to Choose – The Pill; 1963 Showdown in Birmingham – Civil Rights. Facilitator: Terry Schwab
  • Losing Vietnam – The Tet Offensive; 1969 Disaster – The Birth of Environmentalism. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • 1974 An Age of Crisis – Watergate; 1975 The Digital Age – The Personal Computer. Facilitator: Tom Machala
  • 1989 Collapse – The End of the Cold War; 2001 The Age of Terror – The 9/11 Attacks. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
MEETS

Wednesdays, February 12–March 11, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

The History and Achievements of the Islamic Golden Age

Tuesdays, February 25–March 10, 10:00 a.m.–noon
The remainder of this course will likely take place in Fall 2020.

Monument in Khiva, Uzbekistan, to the great mathematician Al Khwarizmi, 2003

Location

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

FOCUS

Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI-UO Central Oregon members facilitate a fascinating new look at a crucial 500-year history, headquartered in Baghdad, but impacting the wider world. The History and Achievements of the Islamic Golden Age is an opportunity to get to know the story and the accomplishments of a great period in human civilization.

Taught by acclaimed lecturer Eamonn Gearon, these 24 Great Courses lectures offer brilliant insights into an era too often overlooked by traditional history textbooks. The philosophers, scientists, inventors, and poets of the Abbasid Empire paved the way for the Renaissance and continue to affect our world today in surprising ways.

Encounter the often-over-looked story of one of the most important civilizations in world history, which is fascinating in its own right and also serves as an important bridge between antiquity and modernity. The course brings the story to life in rich detail and forever changes your perspective on world history.

TOPICS
  • Feb. 25: From Camels to Stars in the Middle East; Ibn Battuta’s Search for Knowledge. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • March 3: Arabian Nights Caliph: Harun al-Rashid; The Arab World’s Greatest Writer: al-Jahiz. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • March 10: Algebra, Algorithms, and al-Khwarizmi; Baghdad’s House of Wisdom. Facilitator: Tom Machala
  • Muhammad, the Hadith, and Imam Bukhari; Interpreting and Defending the Quran. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • The Arab Herodotus: al-Masudi; Cairo, al-Haytham, and the Book of Optics
  • Master Muslim Scholar: al-Biruni; Astronomy in the Islamic Golden Age. Facilitator: Keith Sime
  • Medieval Muslim Medicine and Hospitals; Alchemistry and Chemistry in Early Baghdad. Facilitator: Maggi Machala
  • The Fertile Crescent, Water, and al-Jazari; Jewish Scholar in Cairo: Moses Maimonides. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • The Banu Musa’s Inventions and Automatons; Mosques, Architecture, and Gothic Revival. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  •  Arab Verse, Love Poetry, and Wine Songs; Medieval Mastermind: Avicenna (Ibn Sina) Faciliator: TBD
  • Entertaining in the Time of the Abbasids; Calligraphy, Carpets, & the Arabic Arts Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • When Did the Islamic Golden Age End? Ibn Khaldun on the Rise and Fall of Empire. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
MEETS

Tuesdays, February 25–March 10, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Mysteries of the Microscopic World

Tuesdays, February 25–March 10, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
This class will likely resume Fall 2020.
LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

about this course

We have an enthusiastic group of science-minded people who enjoy presenting introductory college-level DVD science courses and discussing related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. It is not necessary to attend each class in sequence.

focus

OLLI-UO in Central Oregon member Elizabeth Polidan introduces us to the invisible world all around us, a world of astonishing complexity, invisible to the naked eye, and so crowded that its population staggers the mind. We participate in this world every day, often without knowing it.Explore the microscopic world and encounter the trillions of bacteria, fungi, and other organisms known as microbes. Learn the powerful role these microbes play in our lives, from the bacteria in the stomach that helps with digestion to the pathogens responsible for diseases.

Mysteries of the Microscopic World consists of 24 Great Courses lectures that explore how microbes evolve and adapt to various world environments. Learn how microbes grew and changed with us in beneficial associations as we descended from trees and created civilizations. Lectures cover germ evolution, epidemics, plagues, and germ warfare. Also included are discussions of diseases brought from the old to the new world, the origin of life on earth, the survival of microbial life in outer space, and more.

Lectures are presented by Dr. Bruce E. Fleury, Professor of the Practice in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Tulane University. He earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in Biology, both from Tulane. Professor Fleury is the author of numerous articles and newspaper columns, both popular and professional, and a reference book on dinosaurs. He teaches between 600 and 700 students a year, and his courses include ornithology, introductory general biology and environmental biology, the history of life, and evolution in human health and disease.

TOPICS
  • February 25: The Invisible Realm; Stone Knives to Iron Plows
  • March 3: The Angel of Death; Germ Theory
  • March 10: The Evolutionary Arms Race; Microbial Strategies
  • Virulence; Death by Chocolate
  • : NO CLASS – Spring Break
  • Bambi’s Revenge; The Germ of Laziness
  • : The 1918 Flu–A Conspiracy of Silence; The 1918 Flu–The Philadelphia Story
  • The 1918 Flu–The Search for the Virus; Immunity–Self versus Non-Self
  • : Adaptive Immunity to the Rescue; AIDS–The Quiet Killer
  • : The Deadly Strategy of AIDS; Autoimmunity–Self versus Self
  • Allergies and Asthma; Microbes as Weapons
  • Pandora’s Box; Old World to New
  • Close Encounters of the Microbial Kind; Microbes as Friends
MEETS

Tuesdays, February 25–March 10, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

COURSE MANAGER

Elizabeth Polidan

Sacred Texts of the World, Part One

Wednesdays, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
This class has been postponed until Fall 2020.
LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, OR 97701

FOCUS

Religious texts are among the best ways to learn about the faith traditions of other cultures. Authoritative and widely available, they offer a window into a new world of ideas and practices. In our rapidly shrinking world, where cultural traditions are converging at an ever-increasing rate, the value of mutual understanding cannot be overstated. But it would be far too simple to suggest that we can easily discover some universal truth or common ground by a cursory reading of another faith’s sacred writings. These texts exhibit tremendous variety in content, form, use, and origins.

We approach these texts with an open mind and great care, for they are the basis for understanding, comprehending, and appreciating the different cultures of the world. In addition to religious texts, we also explore texts from the secular world such as the U.S. Constitution. As we study these writings, we may learn as much about ourselves and our own beliefs as we do about those of others.

Join OLLI-UO in Central Oregon members Thom Larson and Barbara Silversmith for a fascinating exploration of the world’s sacred texts. The basis for this class is a series of video presentations from The Great Courses, Sacred Texts of the World, taught by Grant Hardy, Professor of History and Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina. Guest presentations by members of the Bend religious community are also featured.

Rev. Thom Larson is a retired United Methodist pastor who served churches in Oregon and Idaho for 34 years. He received his Master of Divinity degree from McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. Barbara Silversmith is "a lifelong learner," with three master’s degrees, one in theology. World travel has enabled her to study cultures first hand.

The course is divided into two sections: Part 1 running through May 27 and Part 2 beginning in fall 2020. There may be some supplemental readings for participants in the class.

TOPICS: PART 1

Reading Other People’s Scriptures; Hinduism and the Viudas

What Is Heard – Upanishads; What is Remembered – Epics

Laws of Manu and Bhagavad-Gita; Judiasm – People of the Book

Five Books of the Tora; Prophets and Writings

Apocrypha and Dead Sea Scrolls; Oral Torah - Mishnah and Talmud

The Three Baskets of Buddhism; Vinya and Jataka

Theravada Sutras; Mahayana Sutras

Pure Land Buddhism and Zen; Tibetan Vajrayana

COURSE MANAGERS

Thom Larson and Barbara Silversmith

MEETS

Fall 2020

Writers’ Bloc

Every Monday, 10:00 a.m.–noon
Registration is not required.
LOCATION

Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Rd, Bend, 97701

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

MEETS

Every Monday, 10:00 a.m.–noon

COordinator

Carolyn Hammond


 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon