Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon Courses and Activities

Current Central Oregon course offerings are listed below. Course and activity descriptions for the following month will be published mid-month. Minor edits of topics and facilitators will be updated at the end of the month.

Members will be notified of monthly updates and critical changes via email. We encourage you to check both the course and activity descriptions and the course calendar at the middle and end of the month! Important announcements, like the President's Note and other notifications, will be published as information is available (up to twice per month).

March 2019 Courses and Activities

Kindred Spirits: Landscape Painting and America’s National Parks

Thursday, March 7, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

Join Professor Emeritus James Gramann, PhD, for a fascinating look at the long association between art, conservation, and national parks. Dr. Gramann’s presentation focuses on a group of landscape painters led by a young English immigrant named Thomas Cole that came to be known as the Hudson River School. He covers the birth of the American conservation movement, its expression in national parks, and the role of landscape painting in advancing conservation in the United States. He seeks to answer the fundamental question, "Why do we conserve?" Although environmental ethics, spiritual morality, utilitarian values, and importance to science all have played key roles, the oldest and most enduring motive for landscape conservation in the U.S. has been aesthetics: the scenic beauty and value of a place. It is this beauty that landscape painters celebrated and popularized and that continues to be celebrated today. In addition to Thomas Cole, the presentation describes the impact of other artists on American conservation and national parks, including Frederic Church, Sanford Robinson Gifford, Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, and Asher Durand.

Jim Gramann is professor emeritus of park and conservation policy at Texas A&M University, where he served on the faculty for 35 years. A native of the Pacific Northwest, he retired to Redmond, Oregon, in 2017. From 2002 through 2010, while on leave from Texas A&M, Dr. Gramann worked full-time in Washington, D.C., as the visiting chief social scientist of the U.S. National Park Service. In this capacity, he directed a national social science program providing usable knowledge about people and parks to national park managers, planners, and policy-makers. In 2010, his program received the Department of the Interior’s Unit Award for Excellence of Service. In 2015, the George Wright Society honored Dr. Gramann with its Social Science Achievement Award for advancing the application of social science to the management of protected areas and cultural sites. He has authored over 100 articles, book chapters, and technical reports on park-related issues.

Spring Tonic–Refreshing Ideas from TED Talks

Thursdays, March 14–May 30, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration for the first two sessions is now open below.

Mark your calendar with the topics for April and May and watch your email for those registrations.

Focus

Treat yourself to new ideas on ten different topics from TED talks, a clearinghouse of ideas from the world’s most inspired thinkers connecting with us, a community of the curious. The intent of TED (an acronym for technology, entertainment, and design) is to give us a deeper understanding of this world, with the belief that the power of ideas can change attitudes, lives, and ultimately, our world.

Join facilitators Barbara Silversmith and Thom Larson Thursday afternoons to share your perception of these new ideas in discussions after each TED talk.

Topics
March 14: Happiness

March 21: Religion

March 28
  • no class (Spring Break)
April 4: The Quest for Truth
  • “How to Seek Truth in the Era of False News” (17:59)
  • “How to Spot a Liar” (18:51)
April 11: Immigration
  • “My Wish, My Charter for Compassion” (21:28)–Karen Armstrong
  • “What’s Missing in the Debate on Immigration” (7:57)
April 18: Brain Power
  • “Brain Magic” (19:50)
  • “3 Ways to Make Better Decisions by Thinking Like a Computer” (11:48)
April 25
  • no class
May 2: Creativity
  • “Your Elusive, Creative Genius” (19:29)
  • “The Little Risks You Can Take to Increase Your Luck” (11:40)
May 9: Artistry in Froms
  • “The Genius Behind Some of the World’s Greatest Buildings” (15:04)
  • “The Shared Wonder of Film” (13:13)
May 16: End of Life
  • “What Really Matters at the End of Life” (18:00)
  • “What Makes Life Worth Living in the Face of Death (16:06)
May 23: The Magic of Art
  • “Treating Design as Art” (18:12)
  • “One Year of Using Art to Turn the World Inside Out” (24:10)
May 30
  • “The Global Learning Crisis and What to Do about It” (15:10)
  • “How We Can Help Young People Build a Better Future” (14:26)
Meets

Thursdays, March 14–May 30, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Course Managers and Facilitators

Barbara Silversmith and Thom Larson

Courses

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays, February 5–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Registration is not required.

FOCUS

Join Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent.  We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics:
  • February 5: The Supercontinent Cycle; Feedback Loops and Tipping Points
  • February 12: Snowball Earth and Hothouse Earth; The Second Great Oxidation Event
  • February 19: Deep Carbon—Deep Life, Fuels, and Methane; Biominerals and Early Animals
  • February 26: Between Rodinia and Pangaea—Plants on Land; Life Speeds Up—Oxygen and Climate Swings
  • March 4: From the “Great Dying” to Dinosaurs; Impact! From Dinosaurs to Mammals
  • March 12: Humans and the Anthropocene Epoch; The Next 5 Billion Years
  • March 19: The Nearer Future; Coevolution of Geosphere and Biosphere
Meets

Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager and Facilitator

Larry Weinberg

Imperial Russia: Land of the Czars

Wednesdays, March 6–May 22, 1:30–3:30 p.m.
Focus

First offered three years ago in February 2016, this was so popular that our own resident expert on Russia, Professor Emeritus Bob Harrison, PhD, offers a repeat of this series. Join Bob for an eight-week examination Imperialist Czarist Russia, including background to its organization in Kiev, its revival in Moscow and evolution from a small principality to Eurasian conquest.

The course covers the great czars including Ivan III, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Catherine the Great, Alexander I, and Nicholas II, from the 10th Century to the 1917 Revolution. Discussions on history, religion, culture and geography are covered in depth.

The History Channel DVD Russia – Land of the Tsars augment the lectures.

OLLI member Bob Harrison taught European and Middle Eastern history at Southern Oregon University for 25 years, was a Fulbright Scholar, and taught previous OLLI courses on Islam, Alexander the Great, World War I, Britain in the Middle East, Ancient Western Civilizations, and Imperial Russia.

Topics
  • March 6:  Background: Land and the People: 3000 B.C.-737 A.D. Geography and migrations, Russian settlers, the Slavs, Greek impact. Viking connection and the “Rus”. Orthodox Christianity and Kievan State 800-1240, Mongol invasions. Rise of Moscow.
  • March 13: The Third Rome” Ivan III and Czarism 1462-1505. Ivan IV “The Terrible” 1533-1584. Centralization of Power, expansion to Siberia, and “Oprichina”, Time of Troubles, Serfdom, First Romanovs and Western influences.
  • April 3: Peter the Great and the Russian Empire 1682-1725. Brutality and Reform, Western contacts, Expansion and War, Modernization, New Capital, St. Petersburg “Window to the West”
  • April 10: Catherine the Great and Czar Paul 1762-1801. “Enlightened Despotism”, and Failure of Reforms, Pugachev’s Rebellion. War with Ottoman Empire, Partition of Poland, and French Revolution.
  • April 24: Alexander I and Napoleonic Wars 1801-25. Philosophic Czar, Clash with Napoleon, Treaty of Tilst, Continental System, Invasion of 1812. End of Napoleon, Congress of Vienna, Peacemaking Czar, Holy Alliance, Mysterious Ending.
  • May 1: High Noon: The Nineteenth Century 1825-1881. Plight of Nicholas I, Decembrist Revolt 1825, Crimean War 1854-56, Russia’s Containment. Alexander II and Reform, Emancipation of the Serfs, Assassination. Congress of Berlin 1878, No Warm Water Port.
  • May 8: Sunset on Autocracy: Last of the Romanovs 1881-1914. Alexander III and Nicholas II, League of the Three Emperors, the French Alliance 1893, Socialists and Bolsheviks, Russo-Japanese War, Revolution of 1905.
  • May 22: Russia in the First World War 1914-1917.  Bosnian Crisis 1909, Alliance System, Sarajevo June 28, 1914. Slaughter on Russian Front, Brusilov Offensive, Political Collapse of Nicholas II, February Revolution, October Revolution, Execution of the Romanovs.
Meets

Wednesdays, March 13–May 22, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

COURSE MANAGER

Pat Ackley

Food: A Cultural Culinary History

Wednesdays, February 13–June 26, 10:00 a.m.–noon
Focus

First offered two years ago in winter 2017, this course was so popular that we are doing a back-by-popular-demand repeat. Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate a deeply insightful lens on human history, shedding new light on the evolution of social and political systems, on cultural interactions, economic empires, human migrations, and more. In the process, you discover the stunning richness of world cultures as seen in their distinctive food traditions, and greatly broaden your own enjoyment of fine food.

The scope of this course is global, covering civilizations of Asia, America, Africa, and Europe and how cultures in each of these continents domesticated unique staples that literally enabled these civilizations to expand and flourish.

A 36-lecture/18-week Great Courses DVD series featuring award-winning Professor Ken Albala of the University of the Pacific contributes to the adventure, aiding us in discovering fascinating food lore and culture of all regions and eras—as an eye-opening lesson in history as well as a unique window on what we eat today. The result is a compelling inquiry that will change the way you look at both history and food itself.

  • The revolutions of agriculture: Learn how agriculture arose in the prehistoric world and how it spurred the development of urban organization, political systems, social classes, militaries, and trade.
  • Food and faith: Grasp how food practices became core expressions of religious faith in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, as well as in the Eastern traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism.
  • 1492 and food globalization: Track the great trading empires of the Venetians, Portuguese, and Spanish, and the "Columbian Exchange," where plants and animals from five continents were transplanted across the world.
  • Coffee, tea, sugar, and slaves: Discover how the trade in a group of superfluous luxury items in the era of European colonialism altered the focus of the global economy.
  • Eating in the Industrial Revolution: Learn how capital-intensive, mass food production in the Industrial Revolution forever changed human diet and nutrition.
  • Big business and food imperialism: Observe the vast industrialization of food production in the late 19th and 20th centuries; its economic and human consequences; and the ideologies, movements, and practices that arose to oppose it.
Topics
  • February 20: Egypt and the Gift of the Nile; Ancient Judea – From Eden to Kosher Laws. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • February 27: Classical Greece – Wine, Olive Oil, and Trade; The Alexandrian Exchange and the Four Humors. Facilitator: Terry Schwab
  • March 6: Ancient India – Sacred Cows and Ayurveda; Yin and Yang of Classical Chinese Cuisine. Facilitator: Terry Schwab
  • March 13: Dining in Republican and Imperial Rome; Early Christianity – Food Rituals and Asceticism. Facilitator: Judy Hurlburt
  • March 20: Europe’s Dark Ages and Charlemagne; Islam – A Thousand and One Nights of Cooking. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
  • March 27: no class
meets

Wednesdays, February 13–June 26, 10:00 a.m.–noon

course manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session I

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration for this course is full. Registration for the repeat session of this course, The Vikings, Session II, is open below.

Focus

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans. Course Manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI-UO members will facilitate this course.

As explorers and traders, the Vikings played a decisive role in the formation of Latin Christendom, and particularly of Western Europe. In this course, we study the Vikings not only as warriors, but also in other roles for which they were equally extraordinary: merchants, artists, kings, raiders, seafarers, shipbuilders, and creators of a remarkable literature of myths and sagas.

Among the topics we explore in depth are the profound influence of the Norse gods and heroes on Viking culture, and the Vikings' extraordinary accomplishments as explorers and settlers in Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. With the help of archeological findings, we learn to analyze Viking ship burials, runestones and runic inscriptions, Viking woodcarving, jewelry, sculpture, and metalwork.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today.

Topics
  • February 21: no class
  • February 28: Merchants and Commerce in the Viking Age; Christendom on the Eve of the Viking Age. Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • March 7: Viking Raids on the Carolingian Empire; The Duchy of Normandy. Facilitator: Barbara Silversmith
  • March 14: Viking Assault on England; The Danelaw. Facilitator: TBD
  • March 21: Viking Assault on Ireland; Norse Kings of Dublin and Ireland. Facilitator: TBD
  • March 28: no class
  • April 4: The Settlement of Iceland; Iceland–A Frontier Republic
  • April 11: Skaldic Poetry & Sagas; Western Voyages to Greenland & Vinland. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • April 18: Swedes in the Baltic Sea & Russia; The Road to Byzantium. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
  • April 25: From Varangians into Russians; Transformation of Scandinavian Society. Facilitator: Bob Harrison
Meets

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session II

Fridays, February 8–June 28, 10:00 a.m.–noon
About This Course

Please Note: Due to overwhelming popularity and extremely high demand, we are now offering a repeat session of The Vikings! Course Managers Suzanne Butterfield and Terry Schwab invite members to bring their knowledge of topics and participate in a lively discussion.

This repeat session will start the 18-week course from the beginning, effective February 8, 2019. This means it will be on a different schedule and slightly behind the Thursday session of this course. Members previously registered for the Thursday session may switch to this one, if they so wish. We ask that members commit to attending the session for which they are registered, so that we can control our occupancy.

Focus

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. The second session of this 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today. (full description is above in session 1) Suzanne and Terry will facilitate the courses, unless otherwise noted below.

Big THANK YOU to our member-leaders—particularly Suzanne, Terry, and Helen—for getting this second session going so quickly!

topics
  • February 15: Scandinavian Society in the Bronze Age; Scandinavia in the Celtic and Roman Ages. Facilitator: Barbara Silversmith
  • February 22: The Age of Migration; The Norse Gods
  • March 1: Runes, Poetry, and Visual Arts; Legendary Kings and Heroes
  • March 8: A Revolution in Shipbuilding; Warfare and Society in the Viking Age
  • March 15: Merchants and Commerce in the Viking Age; Christendom on the Eve of the Viking Age.
  • March 22: Viking Raids on the Carolingian Empire; The Duchy of Normandy
  • March 29: Viking Assault on England; The Danelaw
  • April 5: no class
  • April 12: no class
  • April 19: Viking Assault on Ireland; Norse Kings of Dublin & Ireland
  • April 26: The Settlement of Iceland; Iceland–A Frontier Republic
Meets

Fridays, February 8–June 28, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Managers

Suzanne Butterfield and Terry Schwab

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, March 4 and 18, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

Selection: Leadership in Turbulent Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin

For March, the group reads Doris Kearns Goodwin's latest book on presidential leadership, Leadership in Turbulent Times. Goodwin draws upon the four presidents she has studied most closely—Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights)—to show how they recognized leadership qualities within themselves and were recognized as leaders by others.

Leadership tells the story of how they all collided with dramatic reversals that disrupted their lives and threatened to forever shatter their ambitions. Nonetheless, they all emerged fitted to confront the contours and dilemmas of their times.

No common pattern describes the trajectory of leadership. Although set apart in background, abilities, and temperament, these men shared a fierce ambition and a deep-seated resilience that enabled them to surmount uncommon hardships. At their best, all four were guided by a sense of moral purpose. At moments of great challenge, they were able to summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others. (Good Reads)

April’s Selection: Rocket Men by Robert Kurson

Facilitator

Leo McGregor

Meets

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Course Manager

Joyce Pickersgill

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, March 11, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

focus

A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Selection: Foreign Affairs by Allison Lurie

Anglophile Virginia "Vinnie" Miner is a 54-year-old spinster professor specializing in nursery folkore. Granted a six month leave from her college to work on her new book, Miner travels to London and looks forward to seeing her academic and theatrical British friends. On the plane she meets Chuck Mumpson, a loud and vulgar married Oklahoman with whom she is drawn into an unusual, but oddly satisfying affair.

At the same time, Vinnie’s handsome and much younger colleague, Fred Turner, is in London trying to write a book on the eighteenth-century poet, John Gay. Broke, newly separated and miserable, he is distracted by an aging English TV actress, Lady Rosemary Radley and the world to which she belongs.

Both lonely Americans abroad, Vinnie’s and Fred’s romantic liaisons provide a humorous exploration of the complex nature of relationships and also interesting insights into the British upper class and theatrical world.

A charming, comic, and perceptive masterpiece, Foreign Affairs won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1985 and was nominated for both the 1984 National Book Award and the 1984 National Book Critics Circle Award. Foreign Affairs was made into a television movie in 1993.

April’s selection: Ride with Me Mariah Montana by Ivan Doig

Facilitator

Karen Hill

Meets

Second Mondays of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Deb Hollens

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, March 18, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

Topic

Isle of Dogs (2018)1 hour 45 minutes

Cast: Bryan Cranston, Koyu Rankin, and Edward Norton

Producer, Director, and Writer: Wes Anderson

Nominated for two Golden Globes, this highly political and magical stop-motion-animated film, set in Japan, is about a boy's odyssey to find his lost dog following the government’s banishment of all dogs to Trash Island. "Isle of Dogs" is a play on words . . . said quickly it sounds like "I love Dogs.”

facilitator

Georganna Frater

Meets

Third Monday of the. Month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Course Manager

Bonnie Campbell

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Deschutes Brewery Tour and Tasting

Friday, March 8, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Depart UO Bend Center at 1:30 p.m. for a 2:00 tour; return at 3:30 p.m.

Let’s have some fun and visit one of Bend’s famous destination spot—starting point of Beer Town, USA! We will have a 45-minute guided walking tour of Deschutes Brewery. Enjoy the artwork on the walls and history of their label creation. Taste a few of their finest brews, all the while overlooking the west side of Bend!

Deschutes Brewery is a craft brewery located here in Bend. Founded 30 years ago in 1988 as a brew pub by Gary Fish, it is known for such products as “Black Butte Porter” and “Mirror Pond Pale Ale.” As of 2016, Deschutes was the eighth-largest craft brewery and fifteenth-largest brewery overall in the U.S., producing 250,000 US barrels in 2012. In 2008, the brewery opened a second pub in Portland's Pearl District and plans to open a brewery in Roanoke, Virginia. Three of its World gold medal awards are “The Abyss,” “Mirror Pond Pale Ale,” and “Pacific Wonderland Lager.”

Deschutes Brewery is located at 901 SW Simpson Ave, Bend, OR 97702. Members will meet in the UO Bend Center parking lot about 1:15 to sign waiver forms and depart by 1:30 p.m. The tour is 45 minutes, with some allowed for tastings afterwards. We plan on returning to UOBC by 3:30. Please note: the $5 per person tour fee will be collected at the time of registration.

Members Gary Whiteaker is the coordinator for this field trip. Participants may obtain Gary’s contact info by emailing our front office at osher@uoregon.edu.

Coming in Spring

Science Roundtable

The Tuesday afternoon science group plans to revive a class session that was once a regular event: a roundtable discussion of science news. Members are asked to bring news of a science discovery, event, issue, question, concern, or any other science issue in the news. That could be a topic from something heard on NPR’s Ira Flatow’s “Science Friday,” read in a newspaper, magazine or book, or seen in a video. 

You are not asked to have any special knowledge of the topic, just an interest and a willingness to share what you found. Many OLLI members have specialized knowledge in a variety of fields and may have some knowledge of the topic as well.

If you are interested, contact member Russ Hopper with your topic and how much time you would like to have—with 20 minutes being the maximum. For sharing an online video, send the URL to Russ to set up on the classroom computer–or also bring it on a flash drive. We are interested in giving members a chance to discuss a topic that they find of interest and would like to share with other members.

We will set a date no earlier than April when we have enough submissions to fill between 90 minutes to two hours of discussion.

Members may obtain Russ’s email address by request at osher@uoregon.edu. Please be sure to let the OLLI-UO support team you would like to contact Russ Hopper from Central Oregon.


February 2019 Courses and Activities

Trekking to the Everest and Annapurna Base Camps

Wednesday, February 6, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is not required.

When one thinks of the great mountains of the world, two that always come to mind are Everest and Annapurna 1 in Nepal. Both peaks are over 8,000 meters, and the stories connected with them are some of the greatest in mountaineering. While summiting these peaks is a major undertaking, trekking to their respective base camps is well within the reach of almost anyone with the desire to do so.

Please join OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Larry Weinberg to hear about and enjoy photos of his two treks to these iconic spots. The Everest trek was an 11-day trek with the base camp at 17,600 feet, while the Annapurna hike took 10-days with the base camp at 13,600 feet. To actually see these mountains up-close and personal, rather than in a National Geographic special, is a memory to treasure forever. It is somewhat mind-blowing to be at 14,000 feet and realize the tops of these peaks are another 14,000 feet or more above you!

In addition, there will be some scenes of UNESCO World Heritage sites in Kathmandu and an orphanage in the city of Bhaktaipur, Nepal.

Living and Dying: A Love Story

Monday, February 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Join Dan Murphy, MD, and Mark Greene, MD, representing End of Life Choices Oregon, a group assisting individuals and their families who make the choice for medical aid in dying. End of Life Choices Oregon (EOLCOR) presents the 20-minute film, Living and Dying: A Love Story, created by Sher and Rob Safran, documenting the last week of Sher’s parents’ lives. In the film, Charlie and Francie, both in their late 80s, choose to die together. The film is their touching and uplifting story. A question and answer session will follow the presentation of the film.

Dan Murphy, MD, is a retired family physician who practiced in Redmond from 1995 to 2015. He first became aware of the issues surrounding medical assistance in dying while working with patients with HIV/AIDS for ten years in California, during the time when AIDS was almost invariably a terminal diagnosis. When Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act went into effect in 1997, he began to include information—and, if requested—assistance in dying to patients, along with the full range of services that being a family physician entails.

Mark Greene, MD, practiced medicine in Texas for 21 years. He has a dental degree from the University of Tennessee College of Dentistry, a medical degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio with residency training in anesthesia, oral and maxillofacial surgery, general surgery, and plastic surgery. He chose to become involved with End of Life Choices Oregon because of personal experiences with family members and a commitment to the care and respect of those facing the end of life. He has been an EOLCOR volunteer since 2018.

According to the organization’s website, “End of Life Choices Oregon provides personal support and information regarding the Death With Dignity Act and other legal end of life options to Oregonians facing end of life decisions, to the medical community and to the public.”

Lectures

Topics in Art History: Seven Talks

Thursdays, February 7–28, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration not required.

Focus

OLLI-UO Central Oregon member Roger Aikin, PhD, is a retired professor of Art History from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He has hand selected seven topics to present to our members that he has written about and studied for years. Each talk considers an issue or aspect of art history, with interesting artworks and issues that relate to the present day. There will be plenty of time for discussion during and after each presentation. No particular preparation or reading is required to attend, although he will have suggestions for further reading and research for those who wish to follow up. Each talk is self-sufficient.

February 7–North and South in Gothic Architecture.

When most of us think about “Gothic” Architecture, we picture the great cathedrals northern France such as Chartres and Amiens. But there is a totally different group of great medieval churches in southern France that are “well worth seeing.” We will also explore the medieval church and monastic architecture.

February 14–A Sunday Walk in Rome.

Roger Aikin has lived in Rome several times, and this talk is a rambling stroll to some of the famous, not-so-famous, and downright strange places he has encountered in this layer-cake of a city. The Romans have a saying: “Roma: non basta una vita“ (Rome: a lifetime is not enough).

February 21–NO CLASS
February 28–The Unfashionable Human Body through the Ages in Art, Fashion, and Pop Culture.

This talk is a romp through the history of representations of the human body from Egypt to Luke Skywalker. What is “beauty” anyway, and why has the human body been represented so differently at different times?

Courses

The Origin and Evolution of Earth

Tuesdays, February 5–March19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

Join Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent.  We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics
  • February 5: The Supercontinent Cycle; Feedback Loops and Tipping Points
  • February 12:  Snowball Earth and Hothouse Earth; The Second Great Oxidation Event
  • February 19:  Deep Carbon—Deep Life, Fuels, and Methane; Biominerals and Early Animals
  • February 26: Between Rodinia and Pangaea—Plants on Land; Life Speeds Up—Oxygen and Climate Swings
  • March 4: From the “Great Dying” to Dinosaurs; Impact! From Dinosaurs to Mammals
  • March 12: Humans and the Anthropocene Epoch; The Next 5 Billion Years
  • March 19: The Nearer Future; Coevolution of Geosphere and Biosphere
Meets

Tuesdays, September 18–March 19, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager and Facilitator

Larry Weinberg

Victorian Britain

Wednesday, February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration is no longer required for this course.

Focus

Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This 18-week course wraps up its sessions with the final installment of the Great Courses “Victorian England,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics
  • February 6: Victoria After Albert 1861-1901; The Victorian Legacy. Facilitator: Pat Ackley
Meets

Wednesdays, September 12–February 6, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

Food: A Cultural Culinary History

Wednesdays, February 13–June 26, 10:00 a.m.–noon
Focus

First offered two years ago in winter 2017, this course was so popular that we are doing a back-by-popular-demand repeat. Course manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate a deeply insightful lens on human history, shedding new light on the evolution of social and political systems, on cultural interactions, economic empires, human migrations, and more. In the process, you discover the stunning richness of world cultures as seen in their distinctive food traditions, and greatly broaden your own enjoyment of fine food.

The scope of this course is global, covering civilizations of Asia, America, Africa, and Europe and how cultures in each of these continents domesticated unique staples that literally enabled these civilizations to expand and flourish.

A 36-lecture/18-week Great Courses DVD series featuring award-winning Professor Ken Albala of the University of the Pacific contributes to the adventure, aiding us in discovering fascinating food lore and culture of all regions and eras—as an eye-opening lesson in history as well as a unique window on what we eat today. The result is a compelling inquiry that will change the way you look at both history and food itself.

  • The revolutions of agriculture: Learn how agriculture arose in the prehistoric world and how it spurred the development of urban organization, political systems, social classes, militaries, and trade.
  • Food and faith: Grasp how food practices became core expressions of religious faith in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, as well as in the Eastern traditions of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism.
  • 1492 and food globalization: Track the great trading empires of the Venetians, Portuguese, and Spanish, and the "Columbian Exchange," where plants and animals from five continents were transplanted across the world.
  • Coffee, tea, sugar, and slaves: Discover how the trade in a group of superfluous luxury items in the era of European colonialism altered the focus of the global economy.
  • Eating in the Industrial Revolution: Learn how capital-intensive, mass food production in the Industrial Revolution forever changed human diet and nutrition.
  • Big business and food imperialism: Observe the vast industrialization of food production in the late 19th and 20th centuries; its economic and human consequences; and the ideologies, movements, and practices that arose to oppose it.
Topics
  • February 13: Hunting, Gathering, and Stone Age Cooking; What Early Agriculturalists Ate
  • February 20: Egypt and the Gift of the Nile; Ancient Judea–From Eden to Kosher Laws
  • February 27: Classical Greece–Wine, Olive Oil, and Trade; The Alexandrian Exchange and the Four Humors
  • March 6: Ancient India–Sacred Cows and Ayurveda; Yin and Yang of Classical Chinese Cuisine
  • March 13: Dining in Republican and Imperial Rome; Early Christianity–Food Rituals and Asceticism
  • March 20: Europe’s Dark Ages and Charlemagne; Islam–A Thousand and One Nights of Cooking
Meets

Wednesdays, February 13–June 26, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session I

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Registration for this course is full. Registration for the repeat session of this course is now open below.

Focus

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “ The Vikings ,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans. Course Manager Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI-UO members will facilitate this course.

As explorers and traders, the Vikings played a decisive role in the formation of Latin Christendom, and particularly of Western Europe. In this course, we study the Vikings not only as warriors, but also in other roles for which they were equally extraordinary: merchants, artists, kings, raiders, seafarers, shipbuilders, and creators of a remarkable literature of myths and sagas.

Among the topics we explore in depth are the profound influence of the Norse gods and heroes on Viking culture, and the Vikings' extraordinary accomplishments as explorers and settlers in Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. With the help of archeological findings, we learn to analyze Viking ship burials, runestones and runic inscriptions, Viking woodcarving, jewelry, sculpture, and metalwork.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today.

Topics
  • February 7: Runes, Poetry, and Visual Arts; Legendary Kings and Heroes. Facilitator: Bonnie Campbell
  • February 14: A Revolution in Shipbuilding; Warfare and Society in the Viking Age. Facilitator: William De Shaw
  • February 21: NO CLASS
  • February 28: Merchants and Commerce in the Viking Age; Christendom on the Eve of the Viking Age. Facilitator: Thom Larson
  • March 7: Viking Raids on the Carolingian Empire; The Duchy of Normandy. Facilitator: Barbara Silversmith
  • March 14: Viking Assault on England; The Danelaw. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • March 21: Viking Assault on Ireland; Norse Kings of Dublin and Ireland. Facilitator: Joe Jezukewicz
  • March 28: NO CLASS
Meets

Thursdays, January 10–May 30, 10:00 a.m.–Noon

Course Manager

Pat Ackley

The Vikings, Session II

Fridays, February 8–June 28, 10:00 a.m.–noon
About This Course

Please Note: Due to overwhelming popularity and extremely high demand, we are now offering a repeat session of The Vikings!Course Managers Suzanne Butterfield and Terry Schwab offer a no-frills second session of this class, during which they invite members to bring their knowledge of topics and participate in a lively discussion.

This repeat session will start this 18-week course from the beginning, effective February 8, 2019. This means it will be on a different schedule and slightly behind the Thursday session of this course. Members previously registered for the Thursday session may switch to this one, if they so wish. We ask that members commit to attending the session for which they are registered, so that we can control our occupancy.

Focus

The Vikings were a people whose history stretched from the Vinland settlements in Newfoundland to Baghdad. Be prepared to challenge stereotypical images of the Vikings that have long obscured the Vikings' importance in European history. The second session of this 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program The Vikings,” taught by Dr. Kenneth W. Harl, Professor of Classical and Byzantine History at Tulane University in New Orleans.

Who were the Vikings? Much more, perhaps, than you may think: raiders, seafarers, kings, and writers, a people who truly define the history of Europe, and whose brave, adventurous, and creative spirit still survives today. (full description is above in session 1) Suzanne and Terry will facilitate the courses, unless otherwise noted below.

Big THANK YOU to our member-leaders—particularly Suzanne, Terry, and Helen—for getting this second session going so quickly!

Topics
  • February 8: The Vikings in Medieval History; Land and People in Medieval Scandinavia
  • February 15: Scandinavian Society in the Bronze Age; Scandinavia in the Celtic and Roman Ages. Facilitator: Barbara Silversmith
  • February 22: The Age of Migration; The Norse Gods
  • March 1: Runes, Poetry, and Visual Arts; Legendary Kings and Heroes
  • March 8: A Revolution in Shipbuilding; Warfare and Society in the Viking Age
  • March 15: Merchants and Commerce in the Viking Age; Christendom on the Eve of the Viking Age.
  • March 22: Viking Raids on the Carolingian Empire; The Duchy of Normandy
  • March 29: Viking Assault on England; The Danelaw
  • April 5: NO CLASS
  • April 12: NO CLASS
Meets

Fridays, February 8–June 28, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Course Managers

Suzanne Butterfield and Terry Schwab

Study and Discussion Groups

Nonfiction Book Group

Mondays, February 4 and 25, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

Selection: Disappointment River: Finding and Losing the Northwest Passage by Brian Castner

In 1789, Alexander Mackenzie travelled the 1,125 miles of the immense river in Canada that now bears his name, in search of the fabled Northwest Passage, only to confront impassable pack ice. In 2016, the acclaimed memoirist Brian Castner retraced Mackenzie's route by canoe in a grueling journey -- and discovered the Passage that Mackenzie could not find.

Disappointment River is a dual historical narrative and travel memoir that puts readers back in the age of North American exploration and places them in a still rugged but increasingly fragile Arctic wilderness. Eleven years before Lewis and Clark, the Scottish explorer Alexander Mackenzie actually crossed the North American continent with a team of voyageurs and Native guides.

In this book, Brian Castner not only retells the story of Mackenzie's epic voyages in vivid prose, he personally retraces his travels in an 1,125-mile canoe voyage down the river that bears his name, battling exhaustion, exposure, mosquitoes, white water rapids and the threat of bears in tar sands, thawing permafrost, remote Native villages and, at the end, a wide-open Arctic Ocean. (Good Reads)

March Selection: Leadership in Troubled Times by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Meets

First and third Mondays of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.*

* This month’s schedule has been modified to accommodate President’s Day on February 18.

Course Manager

Joyce Pickersgill

Writers’ Bloc

Tuesdays, February 5–26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.
Focus

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets

Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager

Carolyn Hammond

Page-Turners Fiction Book Group

Monday, February 11, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Selection: Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

Set in Seattle during the politically tumultuous period of World War II, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet tells of the forbidden friendship between Henry Lee, an earnest Chinese-American boy living in Chinatown, Seattle, and Keiko Okabe, a Japanese-American girl who lives in Seattle’s Nihonmachi (Japantown) district. Henry and Keiko forge an innocent love despite the prejudices of their Chinese and Japanese ancestors. After the devastation of Pearl Harbor Keiko and her family are imprisoned by the US government in an internment camp. She and Henry can only hope that their promises to each other will be be kept.

In 1986, Henry Lee joins a crowd outside the Panama Hotel, once the gateway to Seattle's Japantown. It has been boarded up for decades, but now the new owner has discovered a cache of Japanese possessions belonging to the families who were forced into the camps. Chapters alternate between Henry’s youth during the war with Keiko and 1986 as Henry explores the Panama hotel's basement for the Okabe family's belongings.

Ford’s novel won several awards, including the 2010 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature, the 2009 Montana Book Award, 2009 Director’s Mention, Langum Prize for American Historical Fiction and it was one of BookBrowse’s top 3 Favorite Books in 2009.

March Selection: Foreign Affairs by Allison Lurie

Facilitator

Bonnie Corley

Meets

Second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Course Manager

Deb Hollens

Understanding, Enjoying, and Interpreting Film

Monday, February 25, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Focus

Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

Topic

Executive Suite (1954) I hour 45 minutes

Cast: William Holden, Barbara Stanwyck, June Allison, Fredric March, Shelley Winters, Walter Pidgeon.

Executive Suite has a star-studded cast and was nominated for four Academy Awards (Best Supporting Actress, Best Black-and-White Cinematography, Best Black-and-White Art Direction, and Best Costume Design).

Drama builds as the president of a furniture manufacturing company unexpectedly dies without naming a successor and sets off a scramble among Board members who must choose a replacement. Will it be the calculating business man, the youthful engineer or someone else?

Facilitator

Robb Reavill

Meets

Third Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.*

*This month’s schedule has been modified to accommodate the Presidents’ Day holiday on February 21.

Course Manager

Bonnie Campbell

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Roundtable Luncheon

Thursday, February 7, 11:45 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Moose Sisters Restaurant
Cascade Village Shopping Center
63455 N Hwy 97 #200, Bend, OR 97701

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a relaxing lunch! This is an informal gathering for new and existing members to meet and greet each other. The group meets at Moose Sisters, located in the upstairs level of the Cascade Village. Let coordinator Barbara Jordan know if you’re able to attend. You may obtain Barbara’s contact info by emailing our office at osher@uoregon.edu. We hope to see you there!

Experience OLLI!

Thursday, February 21, 9:30 a.m.–noon and 1:30–4:00 p.m. (two separate sessions)

Experience OLLI—where we offer short classes to the public to give those who attend an opportunity to see what we are all about! Two repeated sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, provide your non-OLLI friends a sample of our great programs. We have seating for 50 at each session, so we have plenty of room! Information cards are available for distribution. Please encourage your friends to join our special event and learn what our wonderful organization is all about!

The event is free, but advanced registration is required.


Archive

An archive of previous courses and activities is available.

2018 courses and activities archive

2019 courses and activities archive