Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Central Oregon Course and Activities

Current Central Oregon course offerings are listed below. We welcome member proposals for study or discussion groups! Complete the course proposal form online, contact the OLLI-UO office, or the Central Oregon Program Chair, if you’re interested in proposing or leading a new group.

July/August     September

July/August 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured This Summer
Wednesday, July 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Central Oregon OLLI member Suzanne Linford (whom you may know as "Susie") leads this presentation examining Protect Animal Migration (PAM), a citizen's advocacy group in Bend, whose mission is to educate the community on the growing problem of mule deer, elk, and other wildlife in Central Oregon, particularly along the historic Highway 97 migration corridor. Protect Animal Migration works with the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Forest Service for the Deschutes National Forest. PAM supports these departments in community outreach and education on issues like the high number of animal/vehicle fatalities in Deschutes County (1,000-5,000 per year).

Susie co-founded Protect Animal Migration in 2007 and earned a Master Naturalist Certification from OSU. She has been a volunteer Interpreter in Wildlife and Social History at the High Desert Museum for eight years.

Sara Gregory, Wildlife Habitat Biologist with the Oregon Department of Wildlife, will share her expertise in the ecology of the local mule deer population, their migratory patterns, shrinking habitats, and other information relating to the critical need for habitat connectivity.

Cidney Bowman, Wildlife Biologist and Wildlife Crossings Coordinator for the Oregon Department of Transportation, will moderate a short film on migrations and wildlife crossings. She will provide an update on the status of Oregon in providing wildlife connectivity and answer any questions surrounding this issue.

Monday, August 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

Each day, 800 women die around the world of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Over half of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan African countries such as Zambia. The majority of these maternal deaths are preventable. Join OLLI member Maggi Machala as she shares her first-hand experience living and working in Zambia to help address this devastating health issue.

During Maggi’s presentation, members learn about Zambia's geography, climate, history, people, and culture. She describes the health and the health care system in Zambia and about the Saving Mothers Giving Life (SMGL) initiative that is striving to improve maternal mortality. Members also hear about what it was like to live as a Peace Corps volunteer in Zambia and the challenges and successes working in SMGL projects.

Maggi Machala, MPH, RN, worked for 40 years in maternal-child health. She served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia in 1978–80 and more recently in Zambia in 2015–16.

Courses
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.–noon

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A great lineup of summer documentaries kicks off the second Wednesday of July, featuring topics as varied as sports to honeybees! We’ve set aside a bit more time to allow for discussion after viewing each film.

Meets: Wednesdays, July 11–September 5, 9:30 a.m.–noon

Film Schedule:

July 11: Cuba and the Cameraman (2017) 114 min. This film looks at 45 years of an American’s visits to Cuba through the lens of video. It’s as much a look at the people of Cuba as Cuba’s history. Facilitator: Pat Ackley

July 18: Where to Invade Next (2016) 120 min. Michael Moore advises the Joint Chiefs of Staff that, in order to make America great again, he will invade only Caucasian countries and bring back their best ideas to America. This film will make you stop and think about America’s social policies. Facilitator: Terry Schwab

July 25: The Tower (2016) 82 min. The gunfire spree by the sniper in the University of Texas Tower on August 1, 1966, is largely remembered as the beginning of our country’s far too commonplace mass shootings. This highly praised film tells the story of that day using only the words of those who were there. Facilitator: Linda Charny

August 1: Icarus (2017) 121 min. Winner of this year's Oscar for Best Documentary, Icarus is a compelling combination of sports and geopolitics, following the investigation into Russian doping scandals.

August 8: For the Love of Music: The Club 47 Folk Revival (2014) 105 min. This documentary explores the folk music revival of the ‘60’s in Cambridge, Massachusetts, including interviews with Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Maria Muldaur, Jackie Washington, and more. Facilitator: Rod Charny

August 15: More Than Honey (2012) 95 min. Bees all over the world are in crisis. This film takes an investigative look at honeybee colonies in California, Switzerland, China and Australia and the phenomenon known as colony collapse disorder. Facilitator: Russ Hopper

August 22: Big Men (2013) 100 min. Big Men follows the trail of oil money beginning with the initial discovery of oil off the coast of West Africa. It compares Nigeria and Ghana’s experiences with accepting financing from a U.S. company, the negotiations involved, the ultimate winners and losers, and the consequences for each country. Facilitator: Joyce Pickersgill

August 29: Fathers of the Sport (2008) 80 min. This chronicle of the history and commercialization of the game of basketball explores how some urban playground basketball players of yesterday were able to overcome racism and poverty through a genuine devotion to the game. These legendary players transformed the NBA forever.

September 5: Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) 120 min. Dawson City is just below the Arctic Circle in Canada and was the jumping off place for the 1896 Gold Rush. It was connected to the outside world in the early 1900’s by cinema. In the late 1970’s, a construction crew unearthed a surprising find: 533 reels of nitrate film long thought to be forever lost. Facilitator: Sharon Dawn

Thursdays, July 12, and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.
Thursdays, August 2, 9, 16, 23, and 30, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is required.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people:

  • An average citizen-soldier of Greece marching into battle in the front row of a phalanx.
  • A Celtic monk scurrying away with the Book of Kells during a Viking invasion.
  • An Egyptian woman preparing her household before a social gathering.
  • A clergyman inside a Medieval monastery, worried about being deemed a heretic.
  • A member of Rome's plebian class struggling to survive in leaky, rat-infested housing.
  • A medieval woman with few options–to get married, become a nun, or turn to prostitution.

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Thursdays, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Focus: Taoist Grand Master Franklin Wood introduces us to Taoism, an ancient teaching that is one of the three major underlying philosophical influences in Chinese thought and culture, along with Confucianism and Buddhism. Tao can be roughly translated into English as “path” or “the way.” Franklin leads us through a history of Taoism and its application in the Western world, including a discussion of the convergence of Eastern mysticism and the scientific method. Examine Taoist masters such as Lao Tzu and Confucius. Come and join us for six lectures about this ancient teaching of peaceful and contemplative concepts.

Registration is required for this course.

Assigned reading for registrants:

  • Tao Te Ching by Lao Tsu (New translation by GIA-Fu Feng and Jane English) ISBN 0-394-71833-X (New translation by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English)
  • Inner Chapters by Chuan Tsu (Translation by Gia-Fu Feng and Jane English) ISBN 0-394-71990-1

Meets: Thursdays, July 26–August 30, 1:00–3:00 p.m.

Presenter: Franklin Wood

Tuesdays, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course Manager and our own science guru Russ Hopper takes us on a six-week expedition in the study of human behavior. Russ’s explanations will be supplemented by a series of Great Courses programs featuring Dr. Robert Sapolsky. Together, they seek to understand our humanity, “the very essence of who we are and how we live our lives.” Using evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, psychology and other fields, Dr. Sapolsky examines all kinds of quirky human behavior. Why do we have bad moods? Why do we have strange dreams? Dr. Sapolsky uses many of his own case studies to illuminate human behavior including junk-food monkeys, mind-controlling parasites, and replacing love with technology (Great Courses). This thought-provoking program will get you thinking about your own complex and intriguing human nature.

Dr. Sapolsky has been the recipient of a MacArthur "genius" fellowship, and Stanford University's Bing Award for Teaching Excellence.

Meets: Tuesdays, August 7–September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Course Manager: Russ Hopper

Study and Discussion Groups
Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Preregistration is not required.

About This Course

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events
Thursday, July 19, 9:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m. or 1:15–3:15 p.m.
https://osher.uoregon.edu/experience_olli

Experience OLLI—where we offer short classes to the public to give those who attend an opportunity to see what we are all about! Two repeated sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, provide your non-OLLI friends a sample of our great programs. We have seating for 50 at each session, so we have plenty of room! Information cards are available for distribution. Please encourage your friends to join our special event and learn what our wonderful organization is all about!

Sunday, August 19, noon–2:00 p.m.

Location: Ponderosa Park

Preregistration is required.

Summer is finally here and that means it's time to break out your flip flops and shorts! It's also time to make plans for the All-Member Summer Picnic! This year, we will be celebrating OLLI Central Oregon's 15th anniversary. We are planning a number of fabulous activities and you won't want to miss out!

More details and registration will be coming soon. Mark your calendars now!

Looking Ahead
Wednesdays, September 12, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About this Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley coalesces fellow OLLI members to facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria's reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions from the Great Courses program "Victorian England," taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; a class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12, 2018–January 30, 2019, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

 

September 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In September
Thursday September 6, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Thomas C. Sanger is author of a new historical novel, Without Warning, based on the German torpedoing of the British passenger ship Athenia at the start of World War II. His grandmother survived the attack and wrote a journal based on her experiences. As a journalist and writer, Tom was inspired to write the book after finding his grandmother's journal. He conducted five years of research at archives and libraries in Great Britain, Germany, Canada and the United States, as well as interviewed survivors and their descendants.

“I chose to write the book as historical fiction because I wanted to explore the emotions of the characters and involve readers on a more personal level with the story,” Sanger said. In researching the book, he interviewed five survivors of the sinking, which claimed 30 Americans among the 112 who were killed.

Sanger, a native of Los Angeles, worked for the Associated Press and radio station KABC, as well as wrote documentary scripts for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation in Sydney, Australia. He also enjoyed a lengthy career in corporate communications in Southern California. Without Warning is his third book but his first work of fiction.

Preregistration is not required.

Friday, September 21, 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Riverbend Community Room, Bend Parks and Recreation District Office

Join us for a timely and provocative presentation of issues confronting the U.S. and countries around the world by one of the leading experts on the subject, Lisa LeSage. Learn about the development of refugee law, and global approaches to migration, which provide a context for the current raging debate over immigration in the United States. This presentation provides an introduction to international refugee law and international human rights norms, their relationship to U.S. immigration policies and practices, and the myths and realities surrounding migration. We also look at how policies play out in real time, and implications for current national and local challenges in the United States, including family separation, unaccompanied minors and human trafficking.

Lisa LeSage is the Executive Director of Immigration Counseling Service (ICS), serving immigrants, unaccompanied minors, and trafficking victims. Prior to joining ICS, she spent five years in the Middle East as Morocco Country Director and Senior Legal Advisor in Istanbul, Turkey for the American Bar Association Initiative working on human rights, rule of law, and refugee issues throughout the Middle East and North Africa.

During her career, Lisa has worked with lawyers, judges, ministries of justice, prosecutors, law faculties, bar associations, human rights clinics and human rights organizations in a number of countries in the Middle East, Europe and in Central and South America. She has authored several articles, and has lectured nationally and internationally.

Lisa received her B.A. from University of Portland, her J.D. from Northwestern School of Law at Lewis & Clark College, and a Master’s in Law (L.L.M.) in Human Rights Law from the University of London.

This is a special lecture open to the public. Please invite guests to attend; no preregistration required.

Courses
Tuesdays through September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course Manager and our own science guru Russ Hopper takes us on a six-week expedition in the study of human behavior. Russ’s explanations will be supplemented by a series of Great Courses programs featuring Dr. Robert Sapolsky. Together, they seek to understand our humanity, “the very essence of who we are and how we live our lives.” Using evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, psychology and other fields, Dr. Sapolsky examines all kinds of quirky human behavior. Why do we have bad moods? Why do we have strange dreams? Dr. Sapolsky uses many of his own case studies to illuminate human behavior including junk-food monkeys, mind-controlling parasites, and replacing love with technology (Great Courses). This thought-provoking program will get you thinking about your own complex and intriguing human nature.

Dr. Sapolsky has been the recipient of a MacArthur “genius” fellowship, and Stanford University’s Bing Award for Teaching Excellence.

Topics

  • August 7: What’s So Special About Being Human?; Junk-Food Monkeys
  • August 14: The Burden of Being Burden-Free; Bugs in the Brain
  • August 21: Poverty’s Remains; Why Are Dreams Dreamlike?
  • August 28: The Pleasures and Pains of “Maybe”; How the Other Half Heals
  • September 4: Why We Want the Bodies Back; Anatomy of a Bad Mood
  • September 11: This Is Your Brain on Metaphors; Sushi and Middle Age

Meets: Tuesdays, August 7–September 11, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Tuesdays starting September 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Larry Weinberg and OLLI-UO Central Oregon associates for an in-depth look at how our earth came into being and changed through time. Larry will begin with a look at the very beginnings of the universe and how those events lead to the formation of the earth. The course will introduce the co-evolution of life and minerals in the early earth. The program will be augmented with the Great Courses program “The Origin and Evolution of Earth: From the Big Bang to the Future of Human Existence,” taught by Robert M. Hazen, PhD, Professor of Earth Sciences at George Mason University.

Topics will include the unique story of the formation of diamonds and their role in formation of planets. The story will also explore the deposits resulting from the Great Oxidation Event and how plate tectonics play a role in the changing earth as it has for more than 3 billion years. The Cambrian explosion is unique in the history of life on earth in that it allowed life to proliferate once the chemistry of the oceans made life possible.

Minerals are also fundamental to the story of earth. They play major roles in life itself and are useful to us in building modern civilization. The study of mineral evidence for milestones in earth’s history leads to understanding how we have rocks older than earth, the formation of the moon, the first continents, and the first supercontinent. We will discover that the earth has gone through a series of colors including, green, white, red, gray, blue, and black.

Topics

  • September 18: Mineralogy and a New View of Earth; Origin and Evolution of the Early Universe
  • September 25: Origins of the Elements—Nucleosynthesis; Ur-Minerals, First Crystals in the Cosmos

Meets: Tuesdays, September 18–December 18, 1:45–3:45 p.m.

Wednesdays starting September 12, 10:00 a.m.–noon

About This Course

Focus: Need another history fix? History course manager extraordinaire Pat Ackley and fellow OLLI members facilitate sessions about the United Kingdom in the era of Queen Victoria’s reign. This new 18-week course supplements its sessions with the Great Courses program “Victorian England,” taught by Dr. Patrick N. Allitt, Professor of American History at Emory University. Professor Allitt examines British society changing from a largely illiterate farming country to a modern great industrial one. Understanding how the British and their institutions managed peacefully to accommodate and manage the currents of change is one of the main themes in this course.

During the classes, we cover Britain's rule over its Empire; the class-bound society; the problems of poverty and crime; Victorian achievements in art, literature, architecture, and music; the lives of Victorian women; the challenges facing working people and the rise of trade unionism; the discoveries of Victorian explorers in Africa; and so much more.

Topics

  • September 12: The Victorian Paradox; Victoria’s Early Reign—1837–1861
  • September 19: The Industrial Revolution—1750–1830; Railways and Steamships
  • September 26: Parliamentary Reform and Chartism; The Upper- and Middle-Class Woman
  • October 3: The Working-Class Woman; The State Church and Evangelical Revival
  • October 10: The Oxford Movement and Catholicism; Work and Working-Class Life

Meets: Wednesdays, September 12–December 19, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Thursdays, September 6, 13, 20, and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.
Thursdays, October 4, 11, and 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: Join us in an investigation of the daily lives of "the 99% of ordinary people whose names don't make it into the history books" (Great Courses). Don't let the “ordinary people” description fool you. Through this unique 24-week course, we examine dissimilar individuals making a living, escaping a volcanic eruption on an island, and socializing at a drinking party, to name a few. OLLI-UO member facilitators, led by course manager and history buff Pat Ackley, provide authentic information about these people's circumstances, while the Great Courses DVD topics from "The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World" complete the picture.

Award-winning Professor Robert Garland, PhD from Colgate University, describes what it was like to live in ancient times exploring what people did for a living, their home life, what they ate and wore, and their beliefs about life, marriage, religion, death and the afterlife.

The past comes alive when you put yourself in the shoes of the imaginary lives of ordinary people.

Unit 3 Topics:

  • September 6: Being Roman; Being a Roman Slave
  • September 13: Being a Roman Soldier; Being a Roman Woman
  • September 20: Being a Poor Roman; Being a Rich Roman
  • September 27: Being a Roman Celebrity; Being a Roman Criminal
  • October 4: Relaxing Roman Style; Practicing Roman Religion
  • October 11: Being Jewish Under Roman Rule; Being Christian Under Roman Rule
  • October 18: Being a Celt in Ancient Britain; Being a Roman Briton

This course is divided into four units:

  • Unit One: Egyptian Lives (4 weeks) June 7–June 28
  • Unit Two: Greek Lives (7 weeks) July 12–August 30
  • Unit Three: Roman Lives (7 weeks) September 6–October 18
  • Unit Four: Medieval Lives (6 weeks) November 1–December 20

Pre-registration will be required for each unit.

Meets: Thursdays, June 7 through December 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Pat Ackley

Thursdays starting September 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

About This Course

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Course managers Burt Litman and Suzanne Butterfield lead us through a sweeping survey of the brilliant paintings of American homegrown masters in 24 lectures over 12 separate sessions. These extraordinary artists document the birth of our nation from its colonial roots up to the brink of World War I and the birth of Modernism. As we examine this vital artistic tradition in its historical, cultural, and political contexts, we discover how the appreciation of the legacy of American art is crucial to understanding the story of our great nation.

A nation's identity is expressed through its art. Great painters capture the essence of a culture's brightest hopes, deepest anxieties, and most profound aspirations.

Our journey is supplemented by the lectures of Professor William Kloss, noted art historian revealing the vital and vibrant tradition of American art. Witness the birth, growth, and development of our great nation as it was painted by some of the greatest artists the world has known. (The Great Courses)

Topics

  • September 13: Art in the New World; 18th-Century Colonial Art
  • September 20: The Genius of Copley and C.W. Peale; A Revolution in Art
  • September 27: Portraiture in Federal America; Early Historical and Landscape Painting

Meets: Thursdays, September 13–December 20, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Study and Discussion Groups
Tuesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

Meets: Every Tuesday, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Course Manager: Carolyn Hammond

Monday, September 10, 10:15 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: A lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

Participants discuss The Great Alone by Kristan Hannah, award-winning author of The Nightingale. Returning POW Ernt Allbright is traumatized by his service and captivity in Vietnam. He impulsively moves his wife, Cora, and daughter, Leni, to a remote area of Alaska to escape his demons and live “off the grid.” Ernt explodes into accelerating abusive behavior towards his family who must find a way to survive both the terrors of the Alaskan winter and Ernt’s rapidly deteriorating mental condition. An epic story that showcases the rugged sweep of the Alaskan wilderness, The Great Alone is an exciting read!

Meets: second Monday of the month, 10:15 a.m.–noon

October's selection: Bend in the River by V.S. Naipaul

Mondays, September 17 and 24, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a good conversation.

For September, the group examines New York Times Book Review “Editor’s Choice” American Wolf by Nate Blakeslee, the story of the reintroduction of wolves in the lower 48 states after their near extinction in the 1920's. American Wolf is a tale not only of a single wolf and her pack's struggle to survive, but also a story of the confrontation between conservationists and a generation’s old way of life. Since there are several wolf packs in Oregon and nearby states, as well as ranchers and farmers, the story is especially relevant for us today.

Meets: first and third Monday of the month, 10:15–11:45 a.m.

October's selection: The Case Against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money by Bryan Caplan

Wednesday, September 5, 9:30 a.m.–noon

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) 120 min.

Dawson City, just below the Arctic Circle in Canada, was the jumping off place for the 1896 Gold Rush. It was connected to the outside world in the early 1900s by cinema. In the late 1970s, a construction crew unearthed a surprising find: 533 reels of nitrate film long thought to be forever lost.

Facilitator: Sharon Dawn

Monday, September 17, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Preregistration is not required.

Focus: Viewing films from a variety of genre selected by the group. Prior to the showing interesting trivia regarding the actors and the film production is presented, followed by lively discussions afterwards.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 1 hour 40 minutes

Cast: Ralph Fiennes, F. Murray Abraham, Edward Norton

Between the world wars, Gustave H, the concierge at a prestigious European hotel, takes a bellboy named Zero as a trusted protégé. Meanwhile, the upscale guests are involved in an art theft and a dispute over a vast family fortune. This is a comedy with subtle political overtones set in the beautiful mountains of Europe.

Meets: Third Monday of the month, 1:30–4:00 p.m.


An archive of previous courses and activities is available.