Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
UO Academic Extension

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Day of Discovery

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

UO Baker Downtown Center, 975 High Street, Eugene, OR 97401

If you are retired (or soon-to-be) and wondering, What’s next?, come join other inquiring adults to explore the joy of lifelong learning at a Day of Discovery. Members of the community may explore one to four of the nine sessions offered in this event. OLLI-UO provides adults with opportunities to explore new ideas with others who share their curiosity about the world around them.

This event is free and open to the public; however, advanced registration is required because of room capacity. Participants may bring a sack lunch or order a boxed lunch when registering.

9:30 a.m. Welcome to OLLI

10:00–10:50 a.m. Breakout sessions (register for one)

News and Views Discussion Group: Attention News Junkies and Current Events Mavens!!
Facilitators: Roger Galka and Steve Koller

Topics will include current, noteworthy items of international, national and local Oregon-Eugene interest. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Everyone will have an opportunity to speak and/or listen.

Roger Galka and Steve Koller are part of the facilitator team for the New and Views discussion group.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Why Plato Says Democracy Leads to Tyranny—And Why We Should Worry He Might be Right.
Presenter: David Kolb

In The Republic, Plato describes what he takes to be the perfect form of government—a society administered by incorruptible well-trained idealistic experts. He has no hope that such a government would survive, suggesting that its leaders would start seeking honor and reputation, then riches, and eventually the city would become a democracy, the form of government with maximum freedom and maximum danger. We will examine his arguments and apply them to the American scene today.

David Kolb received his PhD in philosophy from Yale University, taught at Fordham University, the University of Chicago, Nanzan University in Japan, and at Bates College in Maine, as the Charles A. Dana Professor of Philosophy. Since 2002 he has devoted himself full-time to writing and lecturing.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Race and Reality: Understanding Science Study Group.
Facilitator: Mike C. Rose

This popular participatory class generally consists of viewing half-hour recorded lectures, followed by facilitated discussions drawing on participants’ life experiences and their varying depths of knowledge in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, philosophy, literature and the arts. The sample lecture, "Race and Reality," is from Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science by Professor Steven Gimbel. This half-hour lecture deals with the illusion of "Us and Them" and how prejudice arises.

Mike C. Rose was a career government scientist.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

11:00–11:50 a.m. Breakout sessions (register for one)

Conflict in the South China Sea: International Relations Discussion Group.
Presenter/Facilitator: Randall Donohue

Conflict in the South China Sea: International Relations Discussion Group. Larger than either the Mediterranean or the Caribbean, the South China Sea is home to many of the world's busiest sea-lanes and ports, more than half the world's oil tanker traffic, ecologically important coral reefs and rich fishing grounds. The sea also encloses proven reserves of oil and natural gas. Vietnam, the Philippines, Taiwan, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and Brunei—all hold territorial claims in the South China Sea. However, China claims exclusive and "indisputable sovereignty" over most of the area. This facilitated discussion session will address key issues:

  • What are the historical underpinnings of the disputes?
  • Is armed conflict imminent?
  • Are regional players working to resolve the conflicts?
  • What US interests are involved, and what should be the US role now?

Professor Randall Donohue, now retired, lived and worked in this strategically vital region of South East Asia for ore than 20 years.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Francisco Franco, Adolph Hitler, and Pablo Picasso.
Presenter: Helene-Carol Brown

Francisco Franco, Adolph Hitler, and Pablo Picasso. What did a general, a tyrant and a genius have in common? How did the Spanish Civil War tie these three men together to produce one of the world’s most famous paintings? Join us for the true story of a small Basque village and the inexorable ambitions of a rebellious Spanish general, an oppressive German dictator, and a newly minted "French" artist. Share the amazing story of the three-color masterpiece, Guernica, and the back story of men and machies whose nefarious agenda produced—ulitimately—one of the world's most appalling tragedies, and one of the world's most enduring masterpieces.

Helene-Carol Brown is a graduate of UCLA with an AB in History and received her MA in History from the University of New Hampshire. She has been a research historian, has lectured in History and Art History, and is an emeritus docent at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. She has also published three historical novels of the American Revolution.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Writing as Discovery—A Sampler.
Instructor: George Kaufman

Drawing on parts of a six-week course taught earlier this year, our Sampler invites you to write about what you know, get in touch with what you feel, and let your words flow freely before an edit process damps down your creativity. This workshop offers a space safe for participants who choose to share their writing.

George Kaufman earned degrees from Columbia College (BA) and Yale Law School (LLB). He is the author of Balancing Life and Work, published by the American Bar Association, and Accidental Spirituality, a series of personal essays published in 2017. Over the years he has taught at The Omega Institute, Esalen, NY Open Center, and Pelican Cove.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Noon–12:50 p.m. Lunch and social time (You're welcome to bring your own lunch.)

1:00–1:50 p.m. Plenary Lecture Session

Diplomacy, Soft Power, and American Greatness.
Presenter: Bill Taliaferro

We've been reading a lot lately about profound changes in America's foreign policy institutions. The U.S. Department of State is either being rescued from sclerotic liberal bureaucrats or wrecked by xenophobic populists, depending on who's telling us about the changes. Who is right? What does normal look like? What are our foreign policy priorities, what is the logic behind them, and how do we pursue them? Does the United States even have a coherent approach to the world?

Bill Taliaferro, a retired Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Department of State, served in various positions, as political officer, economic and commercial officer, and vice consul in six embassies abroad, including those in Poland, Malawi, Afghanistan, Slovakia, Norway and Niger.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

2:00–2:50 p.m. Breakout sessions (register for one)

Camp Amache: An American Story.
Presenter: Gordon Nagai

When news of the Bataan Death March broke, it devastated families across the United States, including Americans of Japanese descent detained in U.S. internment camps during World War II. Our presenter was born in Merced, CA, in 1938 to parents of Japanese descent, and was four years old when his family was uprooted, evacuated and interned at Camp Amache in Colorado. His family returned to the family farm when Amache closed in October 1945. This presentation focuses on his family’s experiences at the camp during World War II.

Gordon Nagai graduated from University of California at Berkeley in 1963 with a Masters of Social Welfare and worked as a social worker and photographer until he retired in 2000. He moved with his family to Eugene in 2007, where he now enjoys time with his grandchildren and family. He has taught photography classes at Lane Community College and has a family photography business with his daughter in Eugene.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

Creative Retirement.
Facilitator: Philip Smyser

Join us as we share and expand our retirement "bucket list." This is your opportunity to hear what we and others are doing to ensure that this phase of our life is successful, fulfilling and fun. We share personal stories, suggest ideas and find ways to fill our days with more meaningful and interesting activities that can help promote better health and continued growth.

Philip Smyser received his Masters in Counseling in his 50's and has used the last twenty five years to teach and counsel individuals in various situations. He leads the OLLI-UO Fifth Thursday Discussions Group.

Online registration is closed. Please call 541-346-0697 for registration information.

3:00 p.m. Questions and Answers