Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Eugene/Springfield 2018 Course and Activity Descriptions Archive

An archive of past courses and activities is listed below. Current course listings can be found on the Course and Activity Descriptions page.



January 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In January

Meditation and Mindfulness: group focuses on advantages to the brain

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

OLLI-UO's meditation and mindfulness study group continues from noon to 1:00 p.m. Mondays, using the textbook Mindfulness for Beginners by Jon Kabat-Zinn. During the first 20 minutes of the class, members discuss portions of the textbook. The next 40 minutes are guided meditation out of UCLA Mindful Awareness Research Center, among other guided meditations, with a few minutes of discussion afterward about the particular guided meditation.

Facilitator Janice Friend keeps the focus on science-based meditation advantages to the brain and regularly brings in articles from popular media as well as institutions of higher education. She also recommends books and podcasts by experts and internet sites for personal enhancement.

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allows for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Culture Italiane: Calling all Italophiles, New course explores Italy’s various regions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

This study group, Culture Italiane, will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy’s 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d’Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we’ll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

The class will meet each Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m., beginning January 11. The room will be announced. For more information contact Lee Altschuler.

About This Group

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Lectures

International Relations: Conversation with the Global Greens

Wednesday, January 3 and 17, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Meets: On first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions. Recent topics have included: What about the Kurds?; Scrambling for Positions in the Arctic; Tensions in the South China Sea; Refugees and Immigration; and the Transpacific Partnership (TPP).

Overview of the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Willamette Valley Project

Wednesday, January 17, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Speaker Greg Taylor will explore the US Army Corps of Engineers’ actions regarding Willamette Basin hydrology, a history of the Project and its authorized purposes, reservoir water management/project operations, and Endangered Species Act compliance. With a background as a fish biologist for the Corps of Engineers at the Willamette Valley project, Taylor currently works at the Cougar Reservoir and has spoken to many groups concerning USACE-related projects.

Tale of Three Skulls

Monday, January 29, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Guy DiTorrice (AKA “Oregon Fossil Guy”) will present the story of the fossil field forensics used to preserve and catalog an unknown specimen on private ranch land. He will discuss details of how the fossil was discovered by a horseback rider, steps taken to preserve it, as well as techniques and tools used to handle excavation in an arid-desolate location. The presentation demonstrates how important research and planning are to put an accurate name on a preserved plant or animal fossil in the field. DiTorrice will offer another presentation February 19.

DiTorrice is an Oregon resident and fossil-collecting rockhound. Fulfilling a lifelong desire to collect and share rocks and fossils, he conducts talks for groups throughout the state.

Courses

Film Series: Coming to America—The Immigrant Experience Through the Cinematic Lens

Monday, January 1 and 15, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: First and third Mondays, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Understanding Science: Introducing new series on everyday engineering

Tuesday, January 2 and 16, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

As a kid you may have (intentionally or unintentionally) taken some mechanical device apart to discover how it was put together and marveled at how the working whole had become more than the sum of parts, becoming something almost alive that interacts with people and the environment. With maturity we learn that everything is connected in larger networks and structures. Such is the realm of a new 36-course series starting in January, "Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life" by Dr. Stephen Ressler. The series is offered by the Understanding Science learning circle, a group for persons curious about the Universe we find ourselves in.

As always, each DVD-course lecture is followed by discussion about the issues raised and our personal experiences with the subject matter. Topics in the upcoming curriculum range from "What keeps a car alive?" to "What will keep the planet alive?" Our lecturer is Professor Emeritus from the United States Military Academy at West Point and a Distinguished Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He is a registered civil engineer and holds a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from Lehigh University as well as other graduate degrees.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Philosophy Salon

Mondays, January 8 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow.

The Art of Documentary Film

Tuesdays, January 16–February 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This course will examine the development of documentary film from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the present. The world of documentary is vast and currently burgeoning with new films and filmmakers. Rather than screen complete films, we will study significant clips from a variety of films illustrative of major milestones with guided discussions and audience participation. Five sessions will entail an exploration of documentary origins and history (January 16); and the following thematic modes: verité (January 23); propagandistic (January 30); participatory (February 6); and activism (February 13).

Instructor Andy Walcott, an OLLI member since 2015, retired from a career in secondary education as a teacher of high school English, broadcast journalism and video production, and a K-12 Media Director. He holds a BA and MEd in English from the University of Michigan, an MLS in Educational Media from Rutgers and has completed graduate work in Instructional Systems Technology from Indiana University. Since retiring he works as an independent video producer specializing in documentary productions for small and medium businesses, government and non-profit agencies, and family heritage videos. He is also an active member of the International Documentary Association based in Los Angeles and attends professional conferences and workshops in documentary filmmaking.

Women, Myth, and Culture

Wednesday, January 24 and 31, noon–1:30 p.m.

These are the first two sessions of a nine-part course exploring how myths and folktales have shaped our assumptions about the roles and “place” of women from ancient times to the present—what some might call “his-story.” Presenter Delia Fisher will look at how stories about femininity, mothering, sexuality, and appearance still permeate contemporary thought under the guises of advertising, art, and fairy tales, unconsciously influencing attitudes, aspirations, and self-image. The course will explore the connections between past and present representations of women and ways in which some women writers and artists have challenged, revised, and re-mythologized narratives that categorize and limit ideas about the feminine.

Registration is limited to 20 participants and will begin on January 9, after the holiday break. A course reading packet is being prepared for participants, information on cost and where to obtain a copy will be provided to those registered prior to the first session.

Study and Discussion Groups

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, January 1, 15, and 29, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Brown Bag Opera

Tuesday, January 2, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of the art of opera.

Meets: First Tuesday of the month, September–June at 11:45–1:15 p.m.

Facilitator: Phyllis Villec

We follow a casual format that includes discussion of opera performances that people have heard, PowerPoint previews of live operas that will be performed in Eugene and other Oregon cities, and previews of the Metropolitan Opera live HDTV performances. Occasionally there is a guest speaker or singer.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, January 3 and 17, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: First and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Spanish Conversation Discussions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well, and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty, but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, January 4 and 18, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, January 4 and 18, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Thinking Aloud is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, January 4 and 18, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: First and third Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Solutions

Monday, January 8 and 22, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: Second and fourth Monday of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Music Appreciation

Tuesday, January 9, 10:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The focal point of this group is instructional sessions on how to listen and enjoy great music, using video programs and recorded music. Many types of music are included (classical, jazz, opera).

Meets: The second and fourth Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m.–noon through February, 2018.

Facilitator: Dennis Lawrence.

Contact: OLLI-UO Program Staff for schedule and topic updates after February 2018.

Each 90-minute session generally consists of 1) a video lecture using instructional material produced by The Great Courses, academic institutions, local libraries or from other sources; 2) listening to and discussing recorded music on CD or videotape. Time is allotted for discussions among those in attendance of current or past musical events in our community.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, January 10, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, January 11 and 25, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy: Announces Selections

Tuesday, January 23, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

January: Astoria or Anecdotes of an Enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains, by Washington Irving

February: The Ways of White Folks, by Langston Hughes

March: The Log of the Sea of Cortez, by John Steinbeck

April: The Way We Live Now, by Anthony Trollope

May: Anti-Intellectualism in American Life, by Richard Hofstader

June: The Sea, The Sea, by Iris Murdoch

The Classics/Philosophy study group meets on fourth Tuesdays from 1:30–3:30 p.m. Members interested in joining the monthly sessions may contact Sheila Patterson for more information.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

OLLI-UO Town Hall

Thursday, January 25, 10:30 a.m.–noon

In this special session, UO Vice President Roger Thompson will provide an overview of the division of Student Services and Enrollment Management and discuss the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon.

Members in Central Oregon will join Eugene/Springfield members for the session via videoconferencing. Vice President Thompson will also take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation.


February 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In February

Day of Discovery: Public Recruitment Event

Tuesday, February 20, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.

Do you have friends who have expressed an interest in OLL-UO or that you think would be interested? Encourage them to join other inquiring adults to explore the joy of lifelong learning in this sampling of all OLLI has to offer. In this free, public event, members of the community may explore up to four of the eight sessions offered. Topics for these sessions include international relations, art history, current events, science, creative writing, environmental issues, philosophy, and creative retirement. OLLI-UO member Bill Taliaferro, a retired Foreign Service Officer with the U.S. Department of State, will present a lecture at 1:00 p.m.

Please note that this is a recruitment event for potential members of the community, and current members have had the opportunity previously to attend each of the presentations, discussion sessions, or workshops being offered. You can help us get the word out by inviting friends and neighbors to attend. As space is limited for each session, please encourage your friends to register in advance: either online at http://osher.uoregon.edu/discover or by calling 541-346-0697. Registration opens on January 9, 2018.

International Geophysical Year

Wednesday, February 21, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This year marks the 60th Anniversary of The International Geophysical Year (IGY). A joint, worldwide project that studied eleven earth sciences, IGY brought together the best scientific minds from sixty-seven countries around the globe. It also ushered in a new era of collaboration. Taking place between July 1, 1957 and December 31, 1958, IGY ended a Cold War hiatus that essentially barred scientific interchange between the East and the West.

IGY witnessed major scientific achievements including the USSR launching Sputnik 1 in October 1957 followed by the USA’s artificial satellite, Explorer 1, in January 1958. Picking up on the program’s immense popularity, Walt Kelly’s comic strip Pogo even parodied IGY as the “G.O. Fizzickle Year” and had its characters attempt scientific ventures like putting a flea on the moon.

Operation Moonwatch wasn’t concerned about lunar fleas, but it was an amateur scientific program created by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory as part of IGY. Its initial goal was to help spot and track artificial satellites. Using hand-built telescopes, all sorts of amateur astronomers from teenagers to octogenarians served on Moonwatch teams around the globe and monitored the nighttime skies. OLLI’s Kirk Taylor was one of them. A budding astronomer since he was three, he joined the Sacramento Astronomical Society in 1957 at age 14 and took part in the Moonwatch program from 1958 through 1961. Kirk will share first-hand views of the entire project from someone who was actually there.

Lectures

Doug Emlong: Oregon's Smithsonian Connection

Monday, February 19, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Guy DiTorrice presents the detailed research story from the archives of the Smithsonian Institution on how hundreds of tons of Oregon fossils made their way to our nation’s capital, thanks to efforts of a young man from Lincoln City. Boxes of files, correspondence, receipts and photographs chronicle the hundreds of documented, inventoried and displayed Oregon fossil contributions made to the American Museum of Natural History by young Doug Emlong. Special project and program assistance for this presentation was provided by the Washington, DC staff of US Senator Ron Wyden.

DiTorrice is an Oregon resident and fossil-hunting rockhound. He conducts presentations for groups throughout the state.

International Relations: US Policy and the Iran Nuclear Agreement

Wednesday, February 7 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Speaker Kate Gould, legislative representative for Middle East policy for the Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL), will cover the current status of the Iran Nuclear Agreement, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. Gould will review the efforts of the Trump administration to undermine the deal and will offer suggestions for a more constructive approach to conflict in Iran and the Middle East. She will address questions about Iran’s role in other regional hot spots and share insights about effective citizen lobbying.

Gould has been dubbed the “Quaker lobbyist behind the Iran Deal fight” for her central role in coordinating FCNL’s effective advocacy campaign in support of the Iran Nuclear Agreement. Her analysis on Middle East policy has been cited by The New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, The Guardian, The Daily Beast, CNN, Reuters, and AFP. Before coming to FCNL, Kate taught Palestinian school teachers for AMIDEAST in the West Bank city of Hebron while coordinating a radio program on peace-building efforts at a joint Israeli-Palestinian think tank in Jerusalem. Kate also interned for Senator Jeff Merkley both in her hometown of Medford and in his Washington, DC office.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Meets: On first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions. Recent topics have included: What about the Kurds?; Scrambling for Positions in the Arctic; Tensions in the South China Sea; Refugees and Immigration; and the Transpacific Partnership (TPP).

Dynamic Dutch Duo

Wednesday, February 28, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Two Dutch artists, three centuries apart, painted brilliantly, were supported by family members, lived modestly, sold very little or nothing, and died deeply in debt. One man painted exquisite interior scenes of domestic order with consummate attention to light and shadow. The other painted most of his work en pleine air, with bright colors and often a broad, flat perspective.

Come explore the worlds of Johannes Vermeer and Vincent Van Gogh with member Helene-Carol Brown. What did they paint, and what innovation in the world of art did they make? Why was their work not commercially successful in their own time? Why has the work of both men been forged and counterfeited in recent times more than nearly any other artists’ works? And, importantly, why is their work so popular in our own time, fetching extravagant prices at prestigious auction houses? We will examine the lives and masterpieces of Vermeer and Van Gogh in this comprehensive introduction.

Courses

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Film Series

Monday, February 5 and 19, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: First and third Mondays, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Understanding Science

Tuesday, February 6 and 20, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Philosophy Salon: Parkinson's Disease and the Philosophy of Chronic Illness

Mondays, February 12 and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

The Philosophy Salon will present a two-session series in which participants will look at definitions of health and illness and how these are questioned by the fact of chronic illness. The group also will look over some material from the ancient Stoic philosophers. Between the first and second sessions members of the group will be asked to read presenter David Kolb’s essay, 'A Shaky Walk Downhill,' about his experience with Parkinson's disease and the issues it raises for a philosopher. In the second session, the group will discuss that essay and its impact.

OLLI-UO member David Kolb received his PhD in philosophy from Yale University, taught at Fordham University, the University of Chicago, Nanzan University in Japan, and at Bates College in Maine, as the Charles A. Dana Professor of Philosophy. Since 2002 he has devoted himself full-time to writing and lecturing.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow.

Study and Discussion Groups

Spanish Conversation Discussions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well, and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty, but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, February 1 and 15, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: First and third Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, February 1, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, February 1 and 15, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Thinking Aloud is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allows for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, February 5 and 19, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Brown Bag Opera

Tuesday, February 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of the art of opera.

Meets: First Tuesday of the month, September–June at 11:45–1:15 p.m.

Facilitator: Phyllis Villec

We follow a casual format that includes discussion of opera performances that people have heard, PowerPoint previews of live operas that will be performed in Eugene and other Oregon cities, and previews of the Metropolitan Opera live HDTV performances. Occasionally there is a guest speaker or singer.

Solutions

Monday, February 6 and 27, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: Second and fourth Monday of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, February 7 and 21, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: First and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

News and Views

Thursday, February 8 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Music Appreciation

Tuesday, February 14 and 28, 10:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The focal point of this group is instructional sessions on how to listen and enjoy great music, using video programs and recorded music. Many types of music are included (classical, jazz, opera).

Meets: The second and fourth Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m.–noon through February, 2018.

Facilitator: Dennis Lawrence.

Contact: OLLI-UO Program Staff for schedule and topic updates after February 2018.

Each 90-minute session generally consists of 1) a video lecture using instructional material produced by The Great Courses, academic institutions, local libraries or from other sources; 2) listening to and discussing recorded music on CD or videotape. Time is allotted for discussions among those in attendance of current or past musical events in our community.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, February 14, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, February 15, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Dining with Friends invites you for dinner

Sunday, February 18, 6:00 p.m.

On February 18, 2018 at 6 p.m. we will be meeting with new and old friends to talk about travel, books we have read, films, funny holiday stories, whatever you can think of.

Janice Friend at friendcaptioning@gmail.com is the coordinator and anxious to hear from you so we can set you up in the group! Sign up now and you still can be included in the January Dining with Friends get-together. Join us. You won’t regret it.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Meet and Greet

Tuesday, February 27, 2:00 p.m.

Join your OLLI-UO friends, old and new, at the first “OLLI Meet and Greet” of 2018 at the Downtown Athletic Club starting at 2:00 p.m. Order a beverage and a bite to eat, if you wish, or just join in the conversation and fun of being together.

If you plan to attend, please register with Julie Jessal. There is no charge, but due to seating, attendance will be limited to 30. Julie will be happy to send you the Axe Billy Grill and Sports Bar happy hour menu for your preview and the 'Starter of the Month,' a quote or idea on a timely, fun, and thought-provoking theme that may be used as a conversation starter. Don’t miss out; sign up today!


March 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In March

What Makes Life Meaningful?

Tuesday, March 27, Noon–1:30 p.m.

This Oregon Humanities Conversation Project presentation will be open to the public, so tell everyone about it and bring friends.

The question of what makes life meaningful has occupied human thinking for thousands of years. Religious leaders, philosophers, and scientists have pondered and offered an array of answers that are as profound, enigmatic, and rich as the question itself. Are we sparks of divine creation, or simply meaning-making creatures, or genes replicating themselves for no other purpose than adapting to our natural environment?

Presenter/facilitators for this discussion are Prakash Chenjeri and Fred Grewe. Chenjeri is a professor of philosophy, chair of the Philosophy Program and co-director of the Democracy Project at Southern Oregon University. While he teaches a variety of courses in philosophy and the Honors College, his primary research interests are political philosophy, scientific literacy and democracy, topics in philosophy of science, and issues in science and religion. Grewe is a board certified chaplain of the Association of Professional Chaplains with a Doctor of Ministry degree from the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley. He is an ordained United Church of Christ minister working for Providence Hospice in Medford, Oregon. Fred’s book, What the Dying Have Taught Me about Living: The Awful Amazing Grace of God, was recently published by Pilgrim Press.

Through the Conversation Project, Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage community members in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future.

Lectures

International Relations: Conversation with the Global Greens

Wednesday, March 7 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Keli Yen will connect with us from Sweden where she works as Convenor of Global Greens, the organization of Green political parties and movements around the world. She will contribute her perspective in our OLLI discussion on climate change, environmental regulations and clean technologies in Europe. Keli has invited Roger Persson to join the call. Roger is a Swedish politician working on public health and wellbeing, sustainable transport, waste management systems and ecological economics.

We will hear some inspiring examples of European environmental regulations, clean technologies and actions taken to tackle climate change; and Keli will invite our questions and ideas for individual and collective actions supporting further progress.

The Global Greens support collaboration among the 100 Green parties around the world, among their four regional federations in Africa, the Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Americas, and among Greens elected at every level of government - from the local level in villages and school boards, to city councils, to parliaments at the national and regional levels like the European Union, and in the United Nations. At each level the Greens are united by their shared values of participatory democracy, nonviolence, respect for diversity, ecological wisdom, sustainability and social justice. The topic for the March 21 International Relations is to be announced.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Meets: On first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions. Recent topics have included: What about the Kurds?; Scrambling for Positions in the Arctic; Tensions in the South China Sea; Refugees and Immigration; and the Transpacific Partnership (TPP).

Doug Emlong: Oregon’s Smithsonian Connection (Rescheduled)

Wednesday, March 7, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

In this presentation, Guy Di Torrice, the "Fossil Guy," will discuss how tons of Oregon fossils found their way to the American Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC through the efforts of a young man from Lincoln City, Doug Emlong. Di Torrice is an Oregon resident and fossil-hunting rock hound who spoke with OLLI members in January about an excavation in eastern Oregon.

A Challenge to Change our Thinking about Conflict, Violence and War

Tuesday, March 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

This presentation by Beyond War Northwest integrates information from the fields of psychology, history, political science, conflict resolution and communications to offer community members a roadmap to help them, and our nation, face conflicts without resorting to violence or war. Presenters Kara Steffensen, executive director, and Dr. Martin Jones, board member, will consider recent discoveries in brain science and what the science tells us about normal individual human reactions under stress and fear, and how these patterns of reactive behavior are extended to group behavior and national trends.

The current societal fear-based thinking, in an international context with nuclear arsenals, is a perilous way to solve human problems in a complex, interdependent world, Steffensen contends. She and Jones will discuss three guiding principles to help us address local, national and global conflicts, as well as practical steps to begin changing our own behaviors to help create a more peaceful world, reduce political polarization and decrease society's acceptance of the inevitability of war.

Steffensen has been active in peace work in Eugene since 2003 and works as a Spanish/English interpreter. She grew up in Springfield and worked for various environmental organizations in Central America for a decade before returning to Eugene. Jones is a Eugene internist who has been active in social justice, peace and health issues for many years. He was instrumental in restarting Beyond War in 2002 and in creating the DVD Building a World beyond War: A Roadmap for Citizens.

Food and Culture

Tuesday, March 20, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Food transcends most misconceptions that humans have about each other, outside of their own cultural, economic and racial community, according to presenter Martha Rutherford. Through examining foods and how they have changed perceptions of other peoples, we can begin to understand how this planet has been populated. Through eating together and understanding how and from where our feed sources originate, we can begin the understanding that we are all simply human.

Rutherford recently moved to Eugene and is also a new member of OLLI-UO. She is a retired chef, restaurant owner and cooking teacher, and she is a believer in the power of food to cross all cultural boundaries and bring together people who otherwise would never even speak to one another. She finds the transit of foods across the globe and their deep meaning to ritual and life profoundly interesting.

Masterpieces in Peril (Rescheduled)

Wednesday, March 28, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Due to instructor unavailablity, this event was rescheduled for Wednesday, July 25 at 2:00 p.m.

What do a meat cleaver, a jar of acid, an ax, a butcher knife, and a sawn-off shotgun have in common? They have all been used to damage or destroy some of the world’s most famous and beloved works of art.

From Leonardo to Van Gogh, from Rembrandt to Picasso, paintings and sculptures around the world have been slashed, smashed, and shot by deranged and disgruntled visitors at even the best protected museums.

Join us for an examination of the damage to and the restoration of ten masterpieces in peril. Presented by OLLI member Helene-Carol Brown.

Courses

Understanding Science

Tuesday, March 6, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Film Series: Coming to America—The Immigrant Experience Through the Cinematic Lens

Monday, March 5 and 19, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

For discussion: Avalon (1990)

PG 128 MINS

Cast: Aidan Quinn, Elizabeth Perkins, Leo Fuchs, LouJacobi, Joan Plowright, Eve Gordon, Kevin Pollak At the beginning of the 20th Century, a Polish-Jewish family comes to the USA to try to make themselves a better future in the so-called promised land.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: First and third Mondays, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Philosophy Salon: From Atoms to Aristotle to Quantum Mechanics

Monday, March 12 and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

In these sessions, David Kolb will lead an extemporaneous discussion of the relation between Greek and modern theories of the atom. How it can be that the Greek atomists got the big picture right while getting all the details wrong? Why are modern atomic theories perhaps closer to Aristotle? The basic issue is the status of potentiality and dispositions, which leads the huge debate today about how to relate everyday conceptions of human activity, freedom and responsibility to the results of current science.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Study and Discussion Groups

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, March 1 and 15, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed: The Israeli Palestinian Problem

Thursday, March 1 and 15, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

This session's topic: The Israeli Palestinian Problem

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Thinking Aloud is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, March 1 and 15, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: First and third Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Spanish Conversation Discussions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well, and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty, but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, March 5, 19, and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allows for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Brown Bag Opera

Tuesday, March 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of the art of opera.

Meets: First Tuesday of the month, September–June at 11:45–1:15 p.m.

Facilitator: Phyllis Villec

We follow a casual format that includes discussion of opera performances that people have heard, PowerPoint previews of live operas that will be performed in Eugene and other Oregon cities, and previews of the Metropolitan Opera live HDTV performances. Occasionally there is a guest speaker or singer.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, March 7 and 21, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: First and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

News and Views

Thursday, March 8 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Solutions

Monday, March 12 and 26, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

This session's topic: Slavery

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: Second and fourth Monday of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, March 14, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Selection: All the Presidents' Bankers by Nomi Prins (Nonfiction)

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, March 27, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Meeting time adjusted for March to allow members to attend the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Meet and Greet

Wednesday, March 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Once again, join your OLLI-UO friends, old and new, at the second OLLI Meet and Greet of 2018 at the Downtown Athletic Club starting at 2:00 p.m. Order a beverage and a bite to eat, if you wish, or just join in the conversation and fun of being together.

If you plan to attend, please register for this month with Antonia Lewis. There is no charge for the room, but due to seating, attendance will be limited to 30. Check out the Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar happy hour menu for this no host event. (Ask Antonia for a copy when you register.) Don’t miss out; sign up today!


April 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In April

Celebrating 25 Years of Lifelong Learning: "Curiosity is Ageless"

Monday, April 23, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Circle the date and time on your calendar and get ready for a fun "Kick-Off Celebration" commemorating our Silver Anniversary. This free event will be held in the big lecture room on our "birthday." Prepare to enjoy a history-tracing, “memory lane” slide show assembled by Earl Hain, along with recognition of past Earl Hain Award recipients. This service award, named for the founding member and first Council President, was established by a fellow founder Paul Holbo. Guest speaker for the event will be Jim Earl, academic director of the Insight Seminars, who will give a talk, "Bob Dylan, Nobel Laureate, Really?" Hint: it's not about the music or his singing voice.

The next mega-attraction will be the premiere of the "My OLLI Story" video, a production involving members at both OLLI-UO program sites. George Kaufman will follow with a few fun contribution suggestions, from a "six-word memoir" or limerick to something bankable. We are also looking for a loan-able work of art that you have done, to be displayed at OLLI for the period of time you specify (one month? Until mid-December?). The event will wrap-up with an overview of Coming Events throughout the year such as special speakers from the Oregon Humanities' Conversation Project, along with ideas of how you can help support OLLI-UO in this anniversary year and for a sustainable future.

Lectures

Forest Economy

Tuesday, April 3, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Past, present and future contributions of timber production and forest conservation to Oregon’s economy will be topics in this presentation by Ernie Niemi. The presentation will center around a key concept from the Oregon Board of Forestry’s mission statement: to “promote environmentally, economically and socially sustainable management of Oregon’s […] public and private forests” and will draw information from academic, government and private researchers.

Niemi will view the issue through the lens of various aspects of sustainable management: value of goods and services (timber, water, carbon storage, salmon)) derived from Oregon’s forests; jobs and income for Oregon’s workers; climate change; and community stability and economic growth. Rather than promote either logging or conservation, Niemi says he will present relative strengths of each side and let the audience "decide what different forest-management decisions mean for them and for future generations."

Niemi is president of Natural Resource Economics consulting firm in Eugene and has worked on forest- and water-management issues throughout the Pacific Northwest. He led a team that described the potential costs climate change will impose on Oregon, Washington, Lebanon, and parts of East Africa. Previously, he worked as an economist for Douglas Timber Operators and later for ECONorthwest.

Validation Breakthrough

Wednesday, April 4, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Validation is a method of communicating with and helping disoriented very old people, a way to help reduce stress, enhance dignity and increase happiness. Validation is built on an attitude of empathy toward and a holistic view of individuals. Through empathy, caregivers can begin to understand the meaning of what sometimes seems like bizarre behavior.

Validation theory explains that many very old, disoriented people, who are often diagnosed as having Alzheimer type dementia, are in the final stage of life, trying to resolve unfinished issues in order to die in peace. Using Validation techniques we offer disoriented elderly an opportunity to express what they wish to express whether it is verbal or non-verbal communication. When disoriented elderly can express the things that have often been suppressed for many years, the intensity of the feelings lessen, people communicate more and are less likely to withdraw into further stages of disorientation.

Presenter Naomi Feil, M.S.W., A.C.S.W., is the developer of Validation.

After graduating with a Masters degree in Social Work from Columbia University in New York, she began working with the elderly. Between 1963 and 1980 she developed Validation as a response to her dissatisfaction with traditional methods of working with the severely disoriented old-old people who were her clients.

Oregon's Healthcare Transformation

Wednesday, April 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Healthcare management consultant and OLLI member Dan Reece will discuss changes happening in Oregon's healthcare delivery system, focusing on forces impacting that system and healthcare's triple aim and core improvement strategies. In addition, he will explore Oregon’s Coordinated Care Model (CCM) and an early local example as well as Coordinated Care Organizations' (CCO) structure and operating principles, with discussion of the relevance of CCM and CCO for all payers and all patients.

Reece is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker who held management positions at PeaceHealth for more than 30 years. He has served as a consultant for the Oregon Health Authority's Transformation Center, focusing on integrated care. He also consulted with CCOs and provider organizations throughout rural and urban regions of the state regarding integrated care strategies. He serves on the faculty for the Council of Clinical Innovators Fellowship Program. He is a board member for Volunteers in Medicine in Springfield and is a former board member of the Telehealth Alliance of Oregon.

International Relations: Talking Turkey and Russia, Eastern Europe and the Balkans

Wednesday, April 4, 9:30–11:30 a.m.—Talking Turkey
Wednesday, April 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m.—Russia, Eastern Europe and the Balkans

Talking Turkey

With Turkey in the news, retired Foreign Service Officer Larry Mandel will be discussing Turkey’s historical and regional role, why Turkey is important to the U.S. and the West, how we got to this point in our relations with Turkey, especially with respect to Syria and the Middle East. Presenter Larry Mandel will talk with us via video conference.

Lawrence (Larry) Mandel retired in 2016 after 32 years as a Foreign Service Officer in the State Department. Most recently he served as Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey. Larry also served in Jordan, Indonesia, Israel, Hungary, Japan, the UK, and Russia, as well as several assignments in Washington, D.C. Before joining the State Department, Larry was an attorney in Massachusetts, and before that worked as a retail executive for a chain of stores in Chicago. He holds a B.A. from American University in Washington, DC, and earned his J.D. at Northeastern University in Boston.

Russia, Eastern Europe and the Balkans

We know that Russia is meddling in the elections of the U.S. and Western Europe; imagine what it must be like to have Russia as a nearby neighbor. Michael Kirby, an expert in Eastern Europe and the Balkans, will share his perspective on Russia’s activities in the region.

Ambassador Kirby served in the U.S. Department of State from 1979 to 2016. His wide-ranging assignments included Guyana, Denmark, Tanzania, Germany, Poland, Korea, and Washington, D.C. President George W. Bush appointed Kirby as Ambassador to Moldova in 2006, and in 2012 President Barack Obama appointed him Ambassador to Serbia. Michael will join us via video conference.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Meets: On first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions. Recent topics have included: What about the Kurds?; Scrambling for Positions in the Arctic; Tensions in the South China Sea; Refugees and Immigration; and the Transpacific Partnership (TPP).

Courses

Philosophy Salon

Monday, April 2 and 23, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow.

Film Series

Monday, April 2 and 16, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: First and third Mondays, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allows for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Understanding Science

Tuesday, April 3 and 17, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition

Tuesdays, April 10, 24, May 8, 22, and June 12, 10:30 a.m.–noon

Join OLLI member and former piano instructor Phyllis Villec in a series of five DVD award-winning film presentations of historic Van Cliburn International Piano Competitions.

Virtuosity searches for the musical souls of the most gifted young pianists on the planet as they try to make a name for themselves at the Van Cliburn Piano Competitions. The pressure on these young performers is overwhelming, because the stakes are so high: prize money, concert bookings, a recording contract, a career.

At the heart of these stories is the courage it takes for a 20-year-old to go onstage alone before 2,000 people, and hundreds of thousands more online, and play a unique interpretation of one of the most difficult pieces ever written for the piano. The Competition requires not only a transcendent musical ability, but also a mental toughness that must sustain the soloist through three straight weeks of performance. The Cliburn becomes as much a test of character as a musical proving ground. These films show the full aspect of the competitions in terms of musical performances, interpersonal relationships, and the offstage drama of the competitors. Phyllis will lead OLLI participants in discussions during and after the film presentations.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, April 2, and 16, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Brown Bag Opera

Tuesday, April 3, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of the art of opera.

Meets: First Tuesday of the month, September–June at 11:45–1:15 p.m.

Facilitator: Phyllis Villec

We follow a casual format that includes discussion of opera performances that people have heard, PowerPoint previews of live operas that will be performed in Eugene and other Oregon cities, and previews of the Metropolitan Opera live HDTV performances. Occasionally there is a guest speaker or singer.

Solutions

Monday, April 3 and 23, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: Second and fourth Monday of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, April 4 and 18, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: First and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, April 5 and 19, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Thinking Aloud is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, April 5 and 19, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: First and third Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, April 5, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Spanish Conversation Discussions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well, and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty, but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, April 11, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, April 12 and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, April 19, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Delta Ponds Tour

Monday, April 30, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Have you wondered about how and why the Delta Ponds project, near the Valley River Center, was started? How long did the project take to be completed? Who paid for the project?

Lauri Holts, a City of Eugene ecologist, will lead a tour along the Willamette River and will explain the Delta Ponds project goals, the various agencies that supported the project, and benefits provided to the community for recreation and education. She will discuss the benefits to wildlife, the trees and shrubs that were planted, and the challenges in managing the area.

Lauri Holts has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master of Science degree in Marine Science from the University of California, Santa Cruz. She has worked for the City of Eugene since 2003 and has been the lead manager for habitat enhancement, and fish and wildlife monitoring on the Delta Ponds project.

If interested in taking the tour, sign up early since the group will be limited to 20 OLLI members. We will meet and park at the northwest corner of the Valley River Center parking lot at 1:20 p.m. A map of the area will be available in the OLLI office when you register. Registration will open on Monday, April 2 at the OLLI office or online at the Osher LLI website.

Bring comfortable walking shoes, rain jacket, and water. The walk will be approximately two miles on a level path and should be completed in two hours. Visit the City of Eugene website for an overview of the Delta Ponds project.


May 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In May

#MeToo Comes to OLLI

Wednesday, May 30, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Not long ago, researchers were dumfounded to find that schoolbooks dedicated more ink to the changing lengths of women’s skirts than to the entire history of the suffrage movement. And today, while women comprise one-third of the US Supreme Court and outnumber men in college and graduate schools, fewer than one per cent of Americans know how many women serve in Congress or other noteworthy positions. Why is popular culture surprised by the impact of women’s work? And worse still, why are people still shocked to discover the well-hidden realities of gender bias, harassment, intimidation and assault? And how is all this intertwined?

This timely presentation features a panel of knowledgeable persons who will address those questions from a variety of personal and professional perspectives, followed by an open forum. OLLI member Olivia Taylor-Young, a former hospital public relations director, will moderate the panel. Panelists are Betty Wood, who was Life Technologies’ quality assurance manager for 17 years: Florence Ledwitz-Rigby, PhD, former women and gender relations advisor to the president of University of British Columbia and affirmative action director at University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire: Karen Lee, a retired psychotherapist and clinical social work educator at UCLA; and Christine Mallette, recently retired executive director of the Illinois Valley Safehouse Alliance.

Equally important participants, however, will be OLLI women themselves. Since #MeToo’s strength and success comes from the sharing of experiences and finding one isn't alone, those in the audience will be invited (if they choose) to impart their personal stories in a safe, supportive environment.

Lectures

Boldly Going Where Few Dare to Tread: Astronomy in Oregon

Wednesday, May 2, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Dr. Scott Fisher, director of Pine Mountain Observatory (PMO) and UO Department of Physics faculty member, will discuss his plans to bring "cutting-edge observational astronomy" to Oregon. Part of his vision includes astronomy education, research and public outreach in his role as staff scientist at a modern, large-aperture telescope. He also will discuss the PMO and the UO Remote Observatory Control Center, a planned on-campus center that will enable astro-interested community members to observe and take part in research being conducted at PMO. His presentation will include images and videos and is appropriate for all levels of astronomy knowledge.

Dr. Fisher teaches introductory-level astronomy courses and is the physics department’s undergraduate studies director. Previously he worked at the National Science Foundation in Washington, DC and the Gemini Observatory in Hawaii.

Discovering Empire: France and the Atlantic World from the Age of Discovery to the Age of Revolution

Wednesday, May 9, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

In this lecture Dr. Brett Rushforth, Associate Professor of History at the University of Oregon, will discuss the emergence of the First French Empire, surveying the connected histories of France, the Americas, and West Africa from the fifteenth century through Haitian independence. In 1804, when Napoleon crowned himself Emperor of France, he declared that he was building the First French Empire. But he knew that there had already been 400 years of French colonial expansion into Africa and the Americas, centered on the destructive but highly profitable sugar plantations of the Caribbean and fueled by a cruel slave trade of captive Africans. In fact, it was the loss of that first empire in the Haitian Revolution that led Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States, abandon attempts to retake Canada, and pivot his empire toward Europe and North Africa. However much he denied it, Napoleon built his imperial ambitions on the wealth, institutions, and knowledge of the previous four centuries.

The lecture is based on a book Rushforth is writing with co-author, Christopher Hodson, that has taken them to more than 40 archives in France, England, Canada, Martinique and Malta. That book, which will be published next year by Oxford University Press, will be the first comprehensive history of the French Empire before Napoleon. Before joining the UO faculty, Rushforth taught for a decade at the College of William and Mary and was senior academic staff at the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture. From 2012 to 2017, he was the book review editor of The William and Mary Quarterly.

Ethiopia: An Education

Tuesday, May 15, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

OLLI member Annette Rose will discuss a trip she and husband Mike Rose took to Ethiopia in 2012 with the Children of Ethiopia Education Fund, a charitable organization helping poor and disadvantaged Ethiopian girls receive a good early education. They visited six schools, speaking with the children and distributing educational material. Capping the experience, they met Salem, the girl they sponsored. They also experienced the Ethiopian culture, both ancient and modern, traveling north to view the incredible rock churches of Lalibela, to Aksum where the Ark of the Covenant resides, and the historic city of Yeha. Traveling south through Ethiopia’s Great Rift Valley, they also observed wildlife near Lake Awasa.

Annette Rose joined OLLI in 2009, when she and Mike emigrated from Utah. There she was active in planning events for International Women’s Day and Hiroshima Day. In Eugene, she has enjoyed giving presentations of their travels to OLLI and other groups.

Keeping Tabs on America: Surveillance and You

Wednesday, May 16, 12:00–1:30 p.m.

Recent revelations about government surveillance, including Edward Snowden’s leak of NSA documents, have renewed worldwide attention to questions around privacy. Why is privacy important? What are the uses of surveillance? What are the dangers? Independent scholar and writer Kristian Williams will lead participants in a conversation about the scope and consequences of government surveillance, as well as ethical and legal limits of surveillance practices. OLLI-UO is pleased to host this lecture from the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project series. This event is open to the public and members are welcome to invite their friends.

Williams has studied state surveillance for almost 20 years, writing as both a scholar and a journalist. He is the author of Our Enemies in Blue: Police and Power in America; American Methods: Torture and the Logic of Domination; and Hurt: Notes on Torture in a Modern Democracy. He is one of the editors of Life During Wartime: Resisting Counterinsurgency, as well as an occasional contributor to Counterpunch, Toward Freedom, and In These Times.

Sagebrush Rebellion: How Harney County Chose Cooperation over Rebellion

Wednesday, May 23, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Every American is co-owner of the most magnificent estate in the world—our federal public forests, grazing lands, monuments, national parks, wildlife refuges and other public places that have been called America’s best idea. For decades, the idea of federal public lands has been under increasing attack by those ideologically opposed or with vested economic interests, including armed acts that the government has proved stunningly unsuccessful at prosecuting in federal courts.

One such incident was the 2016 takeover of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County. Armed militants seized the Refuge headquarters for 41 days, and occupied the county’s community for three months. Militants pledged to give “back” the land to unnamed “rightful owners” in an effort to enact a fringe interpretation of the U.S. Constitution in which the federal government has almost no right to own and manage land anywhere outside Washington DC.

In this presentation, UO professor Peter Walker will explore this momentous struggle. Drawing on two years of intensive field work, Walker’s forthcoming book Sagebrush Collaboration (Oregon State University Press) shows that whereas federal courts failed to stop this growing movement, the ordinary citizens of Harney County successfully pushed back against the militia takeover and stopped what the militant occupiers intended to be the launch of a second American revolution. Walker’s talk previews the book’s summer release.

Walker received his PhD in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1997, and has served since then as a faculty member in the UO Geography Department and Environmental Studies Program.

Courses

Philosophy Salon

Monday, May 14, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow.

Film Series

Monday, May 7 and 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: First and third Mondays, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allows for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Understanding Science

Tuesday, May 1, 15, and 29, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

The Van Cliburn International Piano Competition

Tuesdays, April 10, 24, May 8, and 22, 10:30 a.m.–noon

Join OLLI member and former piano instructor Phyllis Villec in a series of five DVD award-winning film presentations of historic Van Cliburn International Piano Competitions.

Virtuosity searches for the musical souls of the most gifted young pianists on the planet as they try to make a name for themselves at the Van Cliburn Piano Competitions. The pressure on these young performers is overwhelming, because the stakes are so high: prize money, concert bookings, a recording contract, a career.

At the heart of these stories is the courage it takes for a 20-year-old to go onstage alone before 2,000 people, and hundreds of thousands more online, and play a unique interpretation of one of the most difficult pieces ever written for the piano. The Competition requires not only a transcendent musical ability, but also a mental toughness that must sustain the soloist through three straight weeks of performance. The Cliburn becomes as much a test of character as a musical proving ground. These films show the full aspect of the competitions in terms of musical performances, interpersonal relationships, and the offstage drama of the competitors. Phyllis will lead OLLI participants in discussions during and after the film presentations.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, May 7 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Weekly on Mondays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Brown Bag Opera

Tuesday, May 1, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Promoting a greater understanding and appreciation of the art of opera.

Meets: First Tuesday of the month, September–June at 11:45–1:15 p.m.

Facilitator: Phyllis Villec

We follow a casual format that includes discussion of opera performances that people have heard, PowerPoint previews of live operas that will be performed in Eugene and other Oregon cities, and previews of the Metropolitan Opera live HDTV performances. Occasionally there is a guest speaker or singer.

Solutions

Monday, May 14, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: Second and fourth Monday of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, May 2 and 16, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: First and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, May 3 and 17, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Facilitator: Jerry Brule

Thinking Aloud is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, May 3 and 17, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: First and third Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, May 22, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Spanish Conversation Discussions

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Weekly on Thursdays at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well, and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty, but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, May 9, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, May 10 and 24, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, May 3 and 17, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

OLLI Meet and Greet moving to Third Friday Due to Memorial Day Weekend

Friday, May 18, 2:00 p.m.

We want to see many of our OLLI-UO friends, old and new, at our next Meet and Greet at the Sports Bar of the Downtown Athletic Club. Order a beverage and a bite to eat, if you wish, or just join in the conversation and fun of being together.

If you plan to attend, please register for this month with Antonia Lewis at antonia.lewis@gmail.com or call her at 541-543-9132. There is no charge for the room, but due to seating, attendance will be limited to 30. Check out the Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar Happy Hour Menu for this no host event. (Ask Antonia for a copy when you register.) Don’t miss out; sign up today!

Hayden Bridge Water Filtration Plant Tour

Friday, May 25, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

Drinking water for Eugene and Springfield is drawn from the McKenzie River, a high-quality source that is nonetheless threatened by urban, agricultural, and forestry land uses upstream as well as by changes in water management in the watershed. The Eugene Water & Electric Board's ability to provide nearly 200,000 people and businesses with clean water from the river depends on an efficient and modern water treatment and distribution system. EWEB’s water system includes 800 miles of pipe, 26 water storage tanks, 32 water pumping stations and the area’s largest water filtration plant.

Please join us on a field trip to the plant at 3957 Hayden Bridge Road in Springfield and learn more. The tour is roughly one hour in length and involves walking several flights of stairs. Part of the tour is outside, so be prepared! Whereas parking is limited, a carpooling group will meet in the Baker Downtown Center lot at 1:30 p.m. Preregistration is required, and an announcement including a link for online registration will be sent to members at the beginning of May. Please refer to links posted in the Eugene/Springfield website schedule for pre-tour reading options that may enhance your experience.


June 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In June

We Are Neighbors

Tuesday, June 19, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

We Are Neighbors is a staged reading that documents the courage, hopefulness, and resilience of immigrants living in Lane County. Adapted from Now, I Am Your Neighbor, this touring version is based primarily on new interviews with members of some of the most marginalized groups living in our area, including Muslims, undocumented immigrants, DREAMers, and Syrian refugees. Featured stories entail experiences of immigrants from Palestine, Germany, Mexico, Guatemala, China, Madagascar. The narrative is by local playwright Nancy Hopps and directed by Carol Dennis. Readers will be immigrants and persons very close to the immigrant experience. The half-hour play will be followed by an open discussion.

Lectures

Growing Up in Africa

Tuesday, June 5, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Three students from the University of Oregon International Cultural Service Program will share their story of growing up in Africa. What was their experience in the community and in the country? What kind of music did they enjoy? What languages did they speak? What cultures and religions did they participate in or learn about in school and out in their community? Eben Yemoh from Ghana, Jen Smallwood from South Africa, and Henry Rusasa from Tanzania will share their story and talk a bit about the journey to UO and Eugene to study and prepare for the next step after college. An open Q&A will follow. All three are looking forward to the discussion and getting to know OLLI members. Eben may be familiar to many of you. Part of his program is working as a student assistant at Continuing and Professional Education and he has helped many presenters, facilitators, and course managers.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in Combat

Wednesday, June 6, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) or drones have become ubiquitous in recent years, their use growing enormously since President George W. Bush started using them in Afghanistan. UAVs serve many different purposes, such as search and rescue, wildfire assessment, and photography; however, this presentation will address their role in combat. Although they have become a large part of US combat operations today, they are not without controversy. Presenter Leah Bolger will relate her experience as part of a delegation to Pakistan and will touch on the moral and legal issues of their use. Bolger retired in 2000 from the US Navy at the rank of Commander after 20 years of active duty service in stations such as Iceland, Bermuda, Japan, and Tunisia. Since retiring, she has been active in Veterans for Peace and is creator and coordinator of the Drones Quilt Project. Samples of the quilts will be on display at the presentation.

The Longest Wooden Railroad

Tuesday, June 26, July 3 and 10, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Children of Oregon pioneers in Lane County were not unlike their parents who risked their lives for a new start and a chance to own land and, with it, wealth. By the 1920s, those children were older adults with the same enduring legacy and reverence for hard physical labor to tame the land. However, the landscape they inherited continued to have its economy based on unpredictable crop agriculture and in places was still wild and unforgiving. Harvesting timber was still in its infancy. The Longest Wooden Railroad, a work of historical fiction, relates how the building of a low-cost railroad, made entirely of wood without rock or steel, promises to bring prosperity to the isolated town of Horton, Oregon, a community of farmers in the Lake Creek Valley west of Junction City. Eugene writer David C. Hascall will review the history behind his historical novel.

Courses

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allow for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Film Series

Monday, June 4 and 18, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Promoting the appreciation and discussion of theatrical films. Themes for a ten-twelve film series are selected by the facilitator team several times a year. The sessions include an introduction, screening and discussion.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month at 1:30–4:00 p.m.

Facilitators: Craig Starr, with John Attig, Howard Schuman, Susan and Andy Walcott

Understanding Science

Tuesday, June 5 and 18, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

International Relations

Wednesday, June 6 and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, June 11 and 25, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, June 4 and 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity—in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word…and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing…it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, June 6 and 20, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, June 7 and 21, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The third Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, June 7 and 21, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, June 7 and 21, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

One person volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Monday, June 11 and 25, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Antonia Lewis

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, June 13, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, June 14 and 28, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, June 26, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Meets: The first Thursday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Members’ Meet and Greet

Friday, June 22, 2:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Social time for OLLI-UO members.

Meets: Monthly at the Ax Billy Grill of the Downtown Athletic Club

Contact: Antonia Lewis

If you plan to attend, please register for this month with Antonia Lewis. There is no charge for the room, but due to seating, attendance will be limited to 30. Check out the Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar Happy Hour Menu for this no host event. (Ask Antonia for a copy when you register.)

Shared Interest Groups

Dining with Friends

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Fine Film Varied Views

Facilitator: Deborah Rands Cullen

Ornamental Plants and Landscape Design

Facilitator: Jane Souzon


July/August 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured This Summer

Is Technology Outpacing Our Humanity?

Wednesday, July 11, noon–1:30 p.m.

Technology is often considered a cure-all to our modern challenges. It is, undeniably, a powerful tool in addressing our greatest endeavors. Whether it be automation, the iPhone, or gene editing, some say our technical capacities have outstripped our moral knowledge. Others believe they have provided us immense creativity in dealing with our biggest ethical questions. Are these mutually exclusive? How does technology shape our moral reasoning and our perceptions of, and relationships with, one another?

OLLI-UO is hosting this free conversation with Manuel Padilla, sponsored by the Conversation Project of Oregon Humanities The event is open to the public, so feel free to bring friends. Padilla is executive director of Portland Meet Portland and is a teacher and consultant in the areas of dialogue, conflict transformation, social change, and international aid and development.

Lectures

Faultfinders: The Impact of Borderline Personality

Monday, July 16, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Mark Osterloh will be discussing his recently published book, Faultfinders: The Impact of Borderline Personality Disorder. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is the most devastating, least understood and hardest to recognize mental illness. Osterloh will discuss the behavior of famous faultfinders and explain how to recognize signs of this disease. Prominent persons who may have suffered from BPD include Adolph Hitler, Princess Diana, Marilyn Monroe, Mao Tse Tung, and Donald Trump. Included is a chapter in the book showing that Donald Trump appears to display eight of the nine criteria to make the diagnosis when only five are needed. Osterloh is licensed physician, attorney and pharmacist, and he is a current member of OLLI-UO.

Introduction to Amateur Astronomy

Tuesday, July 17, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Amateur astronomy is a fun hobby that offers a chance to see many beautiful objects in the night sky, but many people are unsure how to start of what to look for. Jerry Oltion will discuss general astronomy and provide advice for beginners, as well as describe how telescopes work and what can be seen with them.

Victor Jara: Music of Chilean Singer-Songwriter and Political Activist

Wednesday, July 18, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Victor Jara (1932–1973) was a Chilean teacher, theater director, poet, singer-songwriter, and political activist who was tortured and killed during the dictatorship of August Pinochet. In this talk, speakers Dr. Daniel Party and Dr. Juan Eduardo Wolf analyze Chilean singer-songwriter Victor Jara’s 1973 album, Canto por Travesura (Songs of Mischief), which came to be the last recording released before his assassination. Because this album marks such a departure from the rest of Jara’s work, the speakers believe that examining this artistic turn can help us better understand Chile’s cultural politics.

Party is Associate Professor at the Institute of Music at the Catholic University of Chile. Wolf is Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of Oregon.

Everything You Need to Know About Wastewater

Tuesday, July 24, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Last May, OLLI-UO members toured the Hayden Bridge Filtration Plant, where water drawn from the McKenzie River is treated prior to delivery to homes and businesses. This month, we have an opportunity to learn about the other end of the process: wastewater management.

OLLI-UO member Dr. Jim Novitsky will provide a lecture on the Biology of Wastewater Treatment. Novitsky has a PhD in microbiology and is a former university professor. His talk will cover the physical, biological, and chemical aspects of wastewater treatment.

Continue exploring this topic with a tour of the local Water Pollution Control Facility on Friday, July 27. Read more about the tour in the Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events section.

Masterpieces in Peril

Wednesday, July 25, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

What do a meat cleaver, a jar of acid, an ax, a butcher knife, and a sawn-off shotgun have in common? They have all been used to damage or destroy some of the world’s most famous and beloved works of arts. From Leonardo to Van Gogh, from Rembrandt to Picasso, paintings and sculptures have been slashed, smashed, and shot by deranged and disgruntled visitors at even the best protected museums. This talk by OLLI member Helene-Carol Brown was rescheduled from March. Please join her for an examination of the damage to and restoration of ten masterpieces in peril.

Living Under the Nuclear Umbrella

Monday, August 6, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Mary Dickson's play, Exposed, puts a much-needed human face on what happened to unsuspecting Americans as a result of fallout from 928 nuclear bombs exploded in the desert near Las Vegas from 1951 to 1992. Mary is in the unique position of being a widely-published writer, a downwinder with a compelling personal story to share, a journalist and an activist to increase public awareness of what nuclear testing did to Americans living downwind.

Sarah Fox is a historian, folklorist, and environmental studies professor. Her book Downwind: A People’s History of the Nuclear West examines the stories of radiation-impacted communities around the American West, in an attempt to reckon with the domestic health and environmental costs of the nation’s pursuit of nuclear weapons.

Mary and Sarah will share how they came to write their works, and why the play and book are even more relevant today as recent events have again brought nuclear weapons to the forefront.

The 'Beast in the Home': New Women and Concubines in the Early China Republic

Tuesday, August 7, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Find out what has happened to concubines in China as the political system changed in this fascinating lecture by Byrna Goodman, Professor of History at UO and a specialist in 20th century China. She is completing a "microhistory" about the 1922 suicide of a female secretary in the office of her employer at the Shanghai newspaper office where she worked. Goodman has recently begun a related project about concubinage in China after the Chinese Revolution of 1911. The laws of the new Chinese republic, established in 1912, mandated monogamy. Nonetheless, concubines remained in many elite households, and men with the resources to purchase concubines continued to see polygynous households as a marker of masculinity and status. This talk examines the politics of social mobilization to abolish concubinage and considers relations among different categories of women.

Courses

Understanding Science

Tuesday, July 3, 17, 31 and August 7 and 21, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Topics:

  • July 3: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—User Centered Design—The Internal Combustion Machine.
  • July 17: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—Torque, Power, and Transmission—The Drivetrain.
  • July 31: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—Suspension, Steering, and Braking—Highway Engineering.
  • August 7: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—Traffic Engineering—Everyday Bridges.
  • August 21: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—Tunnel Engineering—The Railroad

Meets: The first, third and fifth Tuesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

International Relations

Wednesday, July 18, and August 1 and 15, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Topics:

  • July 18: Title TBA, Presenter: TBA
  • August 1: Title TBA, Presenter: TBA
  • August 15: Title TBA, Presenter: TBA

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

This study group will consider the diverse geography, history, traditions, music, famous personalities and local products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook will be use to learn about each region. For participants lacking knowledge of Italian we'll translate textbook passages to make the book accessible to them. For those interested in the Italian language, the course is an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, July 9, 23 and August 13, 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

Topics:

  • July 9: The radical skepticism of Hume; Kant's Copernican revolution
  • July 23: Kant and the religion of reason; The French revolution and German idealism
  • August 13: Hegel—The last great system; Hegel and the English century
  • August 27: The economic revolution and its critics—Marx; Kierkegaard's critique of reason

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, July 2, 16 and August 6, 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first and third Mondays of each month from 9:30 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allow for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday at 12:15–1:30 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, July 11, 18, and August 1, 15, 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Special meeting date due to Independence Day closure on July 4.

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30–5:30 p.m. *

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, July 5, 19 and August 2, 16, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, July 5, 19 and August 2, 16, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Topics:

  • July 5: Ageism, Presenter: Florence Rigby
  • July 19: Iatrogenics, Presenter: Bruce Gates
  • August 2: Today’s Family, Presenter: TBA
  • August 16: Physician Assisted suicide/Death with dignity, Presenter: Bryon Chell

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, July 5, 19 and August 2, 16, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Topics:

  • July 5: "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Edgar Allan Poe
  • July 19: "The Ghost in the Mill" by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • August 2: TBA
  • August 16: TBA

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Monday, July 9, 23 and August 13, 27, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Topics:

  • July 9: Pandemics (flu and others), Presenter: Jerry Brule
  • July 23: Firearms, Presenter: Skip Berlin
  • August 13: Rebuilding Cities/Transportation reform, Presenter: Bruce Gates
  • August 27: Coral Reefs, Presenter: Jerry Brule
  • Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Contact: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, July 11 and August 8, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Book for July: “A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

Book for August: “The Secret Chord” by Geraldine Brooks

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, July 12, 26, and August 9, 23, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, July 24 and August 21, 1:30–4:00 p.m.

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Book for July: "Tarnished Expansion, the Alaska Scandal, the Press, and Congress" by Paul Holbo

Book for August: "The House of Ulloa" by Emilia Bazan

Meets: The fourth Thursday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Tour of Eugene Wastewater Treatment Facility

Friday, July 27, starting at 2:00 p.m.

We will visit the Water Pollution Control Facility on River Avenue, which services Eugene, Springfield, and the surrounding areas. The tour will be conducted by the Metropolitan Wastewater Management Commission and is approximately 90 minutes in length. The MWMC protects our local health, safety, and environment by providing high quality management of wastewater treatment prior to discharge into the Willamette River. Preregistration for the tour is required:

Annual Picnic

Friday, August 10, 4:00–6:00 p.m.

Lively Park in Springfield will be the site of our annual potluck picnic. The park includes a covered shelter and a great playground nearby if you have visiting grandchildren. More details and registration will be coming soon. Mark your calendars now!

UO Pine Mountain Observatory Tour

Monday, Septemeber 10, 7:30 p.m.

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a private tour of UO’s Pine Mountain Observatory near Bend! The tour will last around two hours and include the history of the observatory, the story behind the telescopes, and guided viewing through telescopes, but you may stay and continue to view stars through the telescopes as late as you wish. The group will be meet at the observatory at sundown/7:30 p.m. Come a little early if you want to see sunset from the top of the mountain!

OLLI-UO Trip to Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 18–19

The trip package consists of roundtrip coach bus transportation, Tuesday night lodging with complimentary continental breakfast, Wednesday night dinner at the Wolf Creek Inn, and group-rate OSF tickets for the following three plays:

Tuesday, September 18, 1:30 p.m. matinee of Shakespeare's Othello and an 8:00 p.m. performance of Oklahoma!

Wednesday, September 19, 1:30 p.m. matinee of Sense and Sensibility

Cost:

  • $334/person double occupancy room
  • $445/person single occupancy room

Please note your payment secures your reservation.

Steppin’ High, Spinnin’ Our Wheels: Eugene Celebration Parade (OLLI-UO Outreach Event)

Sunday, July 29, 10:00 a.m.

Walkers and spinners are invited to participate in this year’s Eugene Celebration (EugFun) Parade, “Spinnin' Our Wheels.” Help carry the OLLI-UO banner in the parade to raise community awareness of our wonderful OLLI-UO program. Look for more information in subsequent e-minders. Have a great idea for spinnin' down Broadway? Add it to the parade poster in the Patagonia room. Let's show our pride for OLLI-UO!

Shared Interest Groups

We are currently soliciting ideas for Shared Interests Groups (SIGs) at OLLI-UO.

These groups are another way for OLLI members to continue lifelong learning beyond the classroom and provide new opportunities to form friendships with other members around shared interests. They are independent and self-directed, with members deciding where and when to meet and how the group will function. Groups might include Photography, Lunch Bunch, Moviegoers, Travel, Foreign Affairs Group, Happy Hikers, and Pickleball.

As of May 1, two SIGs have been proposed for OLLI-UO: Contract Bridge and Ornamental Plants and Garden Design. Have an idea? We can assist you find other interested OLLI members! Complete a SIG Proposal Form (available at the Continuing and Professional Education office or from Jeff Houck, sig.olli.uo@gmail.com) and return to the office or Jeff.

Looking Ahead

New OLLI-UO Film Series

September 10–December 17, 2018

"Politics in America: Hollywood Looks at American Politics and Our Political Process"

Join us in watching a selection of films that illuminate and often critique our politics, our political system, and ourselves in a new OLLI-UO Film Series beginning Monday, September 10, at 2:00 p.m. and thereafter on the first and third Mondays of the month through December 17.

Here is the list of films in this newest, compelling film series:

  • September 10, Primary Colors
  • September 17, Advise and Consent
  • October 1, All the President's Men
  • October 15, A Face in the Crowd
  • November 5, The Candidate
  • November 19, Tennessee Johnson
  • December 3, The Last Hurrah
  • December 17, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Please look for more information on this website, and in the September issue of The Oregon Sage.


September 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In September

OLLI-UO Film Series: Politics in America: Hollywood Looks at American Politics and Our Political Process

Mondays, September 10–December 17, 2:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Politics. Love it or leave it, politics is inescapably a part of our lives. It is where our hopes and dreams, our fears and nightmares, our conflicting visions for the future come together and often clash. Small wonder that Hollywood finds the drama inherent in politics—the human conflicts and emotions, the confrontations of personal ambitions and political convictions, and the huge stakes—a rich and apt setting for so many very good films.

Join us in watching a selection of films that illuminate and often critique our politics, our political system, and ourselves in a new OLLI-UO Film Series beginning Monday, September 10, at 2:00 p.m. and thereafter on the first and third Mondays of the month through December 17.

Here is the list of films in this newest, compelling film series:

Othello

Tuesday, September 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

For those who have read Shakespeare's play Othello, or seen it in Ashland, or are about to see it, this lecture is an English professor's introduction to the play, highlighting its major themes and critical problems. Othello is one of Shakespeare's darkest tragedies. It is by no means a feel-good play, but perfectly shocking; one has to wonder what the pleasure could be in seeing it. It also presents special problems in modern performance, especially in America, because of its racial dimension: a black man murders his white wife. One has a right to ask what Shakespeare's audience would have made of that, and whether by today's standards the play is racist (and/or misogynist). How do we respond today to Laurence Olivier's great 1965 performance--in blackface? (Come see.) How does the Ashland production deal with these issues?

Jim Earl is a retired UO English professor. He now directs the UO Insight Seminars for adults and also leads groups to Ashland's Shakespeare Festival every year. This year his group saw Othello in the blistering smoky heat appropriate to the play.

The Comedy and Tragedy of Aging

Wednesday, September 19, 2:00 p.m.–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Author! Author! Who’s writing our lives? Speaking of “insight” seminars! We live our lives from the inside out. Only on the stage page is our human experience visible if not also perceived as meaningful, noble, tragic, and yes, comic. Reading together a few fierce and funny famous plays spotlights the most precious, challenging aspects of our human journey as we age, and gives us insight into the age- old wisdom of this dynamic literary form. Facing life’s drama, what is seen about our lives in Oedipus, the Salesman, Blanche, Cyrano, Quixote, Lettice Doufet? From T.S. Eliot to “Hair,” we’ll see drama making tragic and comic hay of our inner Hamlets.

Barbara Mossberg PhD is Proessor of Practice in Literature at the Clark Honors College of the University of Oregon. She is also President Emerita of Goddard College and City Poet Emerita, Pacific Grove, CA.

Lectures

Without Warning: The attack on Athenia and the start of WWII

Wednesday, September 5, 1:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Author Thomas Sanger will discuss his book Without Warning, including answering questions, additional discussion and a book signing for interested participants. Without Warning, a historical novel set at the beginning of World War II, tells the story of a British passenger ship torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine hours after England and Germany declared war, Sept. 3, 1939. For the book’s author, Thomas C. Sanger, the story is personal. His grandmother, Rhoda Thomas, was aboard the ship, the Athenia, when it was attacked. Ms. Thomas survived the sinking and returned home to America, where she wrote about her experiences. Sanger, a native of Los Angeles, worked for the Associated Press and radio station KABC in his hometown, as well as writing documentary scripts for the Australian Broadcasting Corp. in Sydney, Australia. He lives in San Diego with his wife, Kay. Without Warning is his third book but his first work of fiction.

The Garden as Art: The History of Garden Design from Mesopotamia to the 21st Century

Wednesdays, September 12 and 26, October 3, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Gardens are works of art in three dimensions—four if you count time. The styles of gardens through the centuries are as recognizable as the styles of great paintings, sculptures or buildings. Identifying the elements characteristic of each style is essential to understanding why our gardens look the way they do, and why gardens are cherished by millions around the world. Moreover, gar- dens tell us much about the civilizations that produced them, reflecting the cultural, political and religious values of the people who designed them, and the conditions these people endured. In this three-part series, we will first examine gardens from the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. We will work through the Middle Ages, and on to the Italian and French Renaissance designs, leading to 18th century rococo gardens, and Victorian gardens. We will finish with an examination of 20th and 21st century innovations and eco-friendly designs in fashion now. Along the way we will examine the design of open and closed gardens, and finally how the gar- den has emerged from a place to put art to become a place that is art. Presented by OLLI-UO member Helene-Carol Brown, MA.

What is Time?

Tuesday, September 18, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

“Does anyone really know what time it is?” or more importantly, “Does anybody really care?” OLLI- UO member Dr. Jim Novitsky will examine the technology behind modern time keeping methods and every-day time-keeping devices. Among the topics Novitsky will cover are accuracy and precision as they pertain to time keeping; time standards; and the transmission of time information. He also will delve into questions such as, how much accuracy do we really need and does more money buy more accuracy and ultra-expensive watches? Novitsky has a PhD in micro- biology, an MBA, and is a former university lecturer. This special talk is sponsored by the Under- standing Science study group.

Willamette River Basin: Meandering Channels, Floodplain Connections, and River Health

Tuesday, September 25, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

The Willamette River Basin is home to about two-thirds of Oregon’s fish and wildlife population and has been an economic driver for centuries. As the river’s bounty has been exploited, the health of the river has declined, measured in a loss of complexity and flood- plain connections, reductions in native fish and wildlife populations, drops in water quality and increasing conflict over demands for available water. To accommodate population growth, while maintaining or even enhancing the health of the river, a wide range of people and organizations work together on river conservation efforts throughout the Basin. It will include a thumb- nail overview of the geology and hydrology that drives river processes, changes in the habits of rivers, impacts on the inhabitants of rivers, and efforts to maintain and enhance their health.

Presenter Joe Moll has been Executive Director of McKenzie River Trust since January 2005. The Trust has been active in river land conservation and restoration throughout Lane and neigh- boring counties since 1989. The Trust has been a lead organization for the Willamette River Initiative, a collaborative effort among private landowners, state and federal agencies, and non-profit organizations.

Courses

Understanding Science

Tuesday, September 4 and 18, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures.

Topics:

  • September 4: Everyday Engineering: Understanding the Marvels of Daily Life—Solid Waste Disposal and Recycling—The Future: Engineering for Sustainability
  • September 18: Special lecture on time by OLLI-UO member Dr. Jim Novitsky. See Lecture section What is Time? For more information.

Meets: The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Writing as Discovery

Tuesdays, September 25–November 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room

The popular series, Writing as Discovery, is back this fall. Join OLLI- UO member George Kaufman in a six-session writing course that begins September 25.

Writing is a conversation on paper, Kaufman says. Our life experiences make us into teachers, students, and observers, all rolled into one. In this course, you will have an opportunity to draw on your history to write from what you know, get in touch with what you feel, and let your words flow without the constant interference of yourself critic. The class will include ways to jump-start writing when you face a blank page and opportunities to fire up your imagination when it is time to write. There will be opportunities to share what you have written, but only if you choose to share. Some of the elements of writing that will be addressed are metaphor and simile, style, memoir writing, and Haiku. You may wish to read Writing from the Heart by Nancy Aronie or Gabriele Rico’s book, Writing the Natural Way.

Kaufman earned degrees from Columbia University and Yale Law School. He is the author of the book Balancing Life and Work, published by the American Bar Association, and also is the author of Accidental Spirituality, a series of intimate stories about finding extraordinary experiences in everyday life.

Enrollment is limited, and registration is free, but required.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, September 17, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first, third, (and fifth) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information . . . but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:00 p.m. Alaska Room

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allow for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday at 12:15–1:45 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine deMartin Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

International Relations

Wednesday, September 5 and 19, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Topics:

  • September 5: Title TBA, Presenter TBA
  • September 19: Title TBA, Presenter TBA

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, September 5 and 19, 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, September 6 and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, September 6 and 20, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Topics:

  • September 6: TBA
  • September 20: TBA

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, September 6 and 20, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Topics:

  • September 6: "The Middle Years" by Henry James
  • September 20: "A White Heron" by Sarah Orne Jewett; "Emory Bear Hands' Birds" by Barry Lopez

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings, unless otherwise noted. Additional selections may be provided by the facilitator as handouts. The current anthology is The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd Edition. Joyce Carol Oates, editor. Oxford University Press, 2013

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room

About This Course

Focus: Developing communicative competence in Italian. Some knowledge of Italian is assumed. This is a study group led by a facilitator.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Faciliator: Lee Altschuler

Culture Italiane ("Italian cultures") explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. For those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, September 10 and 24, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

Topics:

  • September 10: Reading Plato's Philebus with David Kolb—Part One.
  • September 24: Reading Plato's Philebus with David Kolb—Part Two.

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Monday, September 10, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Topics:

  • September 10: TBA

Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Note: Solutions will not be meeting on the fourth Monday of this month, September 24

Contact: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, September 12, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Book for September: TBA

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, September 13 and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, September 25, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Book for September: Ecce Homo, by Friedrich Nietzsche.

Meets: The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Star-studded Event: Trip to Pine Mountain Observatory

Monday, September 10, 7:30–9:30 p.m. near Bend

Registration closed.

A private tour for OLLI-UO members at UO’s Pine Mountain Observatory, located 34 miles southeast of Bend, will include a talk about the history of the observatory, information about the telescopes, and the opportunity to view stars and planets.

Although the formal tour is two hours, participants may stay as late as they wish for star-gazing. Registration is required, and space is limited to 35 persons. Please check with the CPE Office to see if space is still available. The cost is $10 per person. Transportation will not be provided, but participants will receive directions and help finding rides or riders.

OLLI-UO Trip to Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Tuesday and Wednesday, September 18–19 Ashland

Trip includes three OSF plays (Othello, Oklahoma, and Sense and Sensibility).

Registration closed.

All-Member Annual General Meeting

Monday September 24 12:00–2:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

RSVP now for the All-Member Annual General Meeting on September 24! Join your fellow members to learn about OLLI-UO news and updates and participate in the election for Governing Council members—and more! Lunch will be served.

Fourth Friday OLLI Meet and Greet

Friday, September 28, 2:00 p.m.

You are cordially invited to join your OLLI-UO friends, old and new, for our monthly OLLI Meet and Greet at the Sports Bar of the Downtown Athletic Club, between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. Order a beverage and a bite to eat if you wish, or just join in the conversation and fun of being together.

If you plan to attend, please register for this month with Linda Rockey. There is no charge for the room, but due to seating, attendance will be limited to 30. Check out the Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar Happy Hour Menu for this no host event. Don't miss out; sign up today!

Shared Interest Groups

Shared Interest Groups (SIGs) are another way for OLLI-UO members to continue lifelong learning beyond the classroom and provide new opportunities to form friendships with other members around shared interests. They are independent and self-directed, with members deciding where and when to meet and how the group will function.

Below is a list of current SIGs. Feel free to contact a facilitator to join in or for more information. Have an idea for a SIG? Complete and return a SIG Proposal Form—available in the Patagonia Room or from Jeff Houck, SIG Coordinator (sig.olli.uo@gmail.com). Forms may also be dropped off in Room 110 of the Baker Downtown Center.

Art and Art History

This SIG will use Great Courses DVDs and other resources to study, discuss and enjoy art and art history.

Facilitator: Ray Staton

Contract Bridge

All players looking to have fun are welcome!

Facilitator: Earl Hain

Dining with Friends

Dining with Friends combines the enjoyment of cooking and sharing a social evening with old and new friends. This is not intended to be a gourmet meal group, but home-prepared dishes are the expectation, whenever possible. Many long-term friendships have been forged through participation in this group. Dining with Friends is open to both couples and individuals. Couples are expected to host four times a year and singles two times a year.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Fine Film, Varied Views

In the SIG, F2V2, we meet once a month to view a fine film together and then meet somewhere close for the sharing of our varied views about it. Two members of the group decide what film we will see the next month, usually on a Thursday or Friday of the second week. Everyone is welcome to join us.

Facilitator: Deborah Rands Cullen

Ornamental Plants and Landscape Design

This SIG will visit each other’s yards to ooh/aah and kibbitz, share information on favorite plants and nurseries, and will occasionally take road trips to more distant nurseries, such as Rare Plant Research, etc.

Facilitator: Jane Souzon

Pickleball for Beginners

This SIG provides an opportunity to experience the fastest growing sport in America! Members will receive basic instruction from an experienced pickleballer. They will then have the opportunity to continue play with OLLI-UO members or connect with the Emerald Valley Pickleball Club.

Facilitator: Jeff Houck

Shinrin-yoku (Forest Bathing)

We are all familiar with how a quiet walk in the woods can calm us down, expand our horizons and intensify our connection to nature. Since 1982, Japanese researchers have been studying the health benefits of planned walking in the forest, using all of our senses to become more aware of what lives around us. This immersion in nature is called forest therapy, forest healing, or in a literal translation of Shinrin-Yoku, forest bathing. This is not exercise, or hiking or jogging. It is simply being in nature, connecting with it through our sense of sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch. Studies have revealed that forest bathing has a positive impact on both physical and mental health. The forest healing movement has spread to Korea, Europe and America, including OLLI-UO. This SIG explores this method by taking two hour walks once a month in wooded settings in the Eugene-Springfield area.

Facilitators: Mona Meeker and Kate Nelson

Writing for Memoir and Autobiography

This small group meets bi-weekly to share personal stories and reflections in a safe, supportive environment. We share our work aloud and welcome constructive feedback. Our group is limited to eight members and currently has a few openings.

Facilitator: Linda Rockey

Look for more SIG information and an online proposal form here on the Information Hub soon!


October 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In October

Oregon’s Greatest Natural Disasters

Wednesday, October 10, 2:00–4:00 p.m.  Alaska-Mexico Room

Oregon seems to be a safe place to live, immune from tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters. The deadliest natural disaster in recent history was a flash flood in 1903 that killed 259 people in Heppner, a small eastern Oregon town. However, we now know that earthquakes and tsunamis have devastated the Oregon Coast every few centuries. On October 12, 1962, the Columbus Day Storm hit western Oregon causing significant damage in many cities. On May 18, 1980, Mt. St. Helens erupted in Washington but the effects were felt in Oregon.

So how do we predict when an earthquake will happen or when a volcano will erupt? Every natural disaster begins as a surprise but there is an underlying predictability to these events. Floods, fires, and earthquakes occur in cycles, part of an ongoing process. If we can predict these events, we can prepare for these disasters.

William L. Sullivan will discuss Oregon’s history of natural disasters, citing select ones from his book Oregon’s Greatest Natural Disasters, and our ability to predict the next big, natural event. Sullivan is an author and outdoorsman who received his English degree at Cornell University, studied linguistics at Heidelberg University in Germany, and earned an MA in German at the University of Oregon. He is a fifth-generation Oregonian who has hiked and explored the Oregon wilderness and published various books about Oregon.  He has also written several novels based on historical events.

Photography: The Art of Seeing and Demythologizing the Art of Photography

Wednesday, October 17 and 24, 2:00–4:00 p.m.  Alaska-Mexico Room

Everyone is a photographer, though most don’t know it. Everyone has the eye of a photographer, though most aren’t aware of it. Nearly everyone is a closet photographer, though most cannot bring her/himself to say it out loud. From early on in the history of photography we have labored under a pervasive mythology about photography that misrepresents the importance of the camera and misunderstands the role of the photographer. The resulting effect is that many now are uneasy about entertaining the thought they are a photographer, usually downplay any skills in taking photographs, and often apologize for what they sometimes do with a camera. Sound familiar?

This two-part series begins with demythologizing what we think of as photography, offering an alternative definition of the photographer. We examine the camera as only a secondary tool as we redefine and come to understand photography as “all about seeing”.

Presenter Gordon Nagai is a long-time OLLI-UO member and a highly skilled amateur photographer who has contributed many photographs to OLLI-UO and UO publications.

Lectures

Medieval Iberian Crusades

Tuesday, October 2, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Armed pilgrimages, or crusades, of the eleventh century will be the topic of this presentation by Professor David Wacks. The earliest of these crusades were in Spain against the Muslims, not to the Holy Land. Wacks will look at how the crusades were portrayed in fiction and how the fiction influenced the crusades.

Wacks is the Department Head of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon.  He is author of Framing Iberia: Frametales and Maqamat in Medieval Spain, published by Brill in 2007, and Double Diaspora in Sephardic Literature 1200-1550: Jewish Cultural Production before and after 1492, published by Indiana University Press in 2015. His current book project is tentatively titled Crusade, Conquest, and Conversion in Medieval Iberian Fiction. He forms part of a research group (Symbioses) working on Biblical exegesis in Alfonso X’s General Estoria (13th c.).

The Garden as Art: The History of Garden Design from Mesopotamia to the 21st Century

Wednesday, October 3, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Gardens are works of art in three dimensions—four if you count time. The styles of gardens through the centuries are as recognizable as the styles of great paintings, sculptures or buildings. Identifying the elements characteristic of each style is essential to understanding why our gardens look the way they do, and why gardens are cherished by millions around the world. Moreover, gar- dens tell us much about the civilizations that produced them, reflecting the cultural, political and religious values of the people who designed them, and the conditions these people endured. In this three-part series, we will first examine gardens from the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. We will work through the Middle Ages, and on to the Italian and French Renaissance designs, leading to 18th century rococo gardens, and Victorian gardens. We will finish with an examination of 20th and 21st century innovations and eco-friendly designs in fashion now. Along the way we will examine the design of open and closed gardens, and finally how the garden has emerged from a place to put art to become a place that is art. Presented by OLLI-UO member Helene-Carol Brown, MA.

The History of the Mexican Farce, "Tricks to Inherit"

Monday, October 22, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

UO Professor Pedro Garcia-Caro will discuss his discovery of the long-lost Mexican play "Tricks to Inherit" ("Astucias por heredar un sobrino a un tio" by Fermin de Reygadas, a mining engineer) while he was researching the mining industry in the New World.The play had been censored in 1790 in Mexico City and found its way to Alta, California, where it was known as the first drama staged in California and was performed in Spanish.Professor Garcia-Caro oversaw its translation into English.The play is relevant today for a clearer understanding of the roots of racism, misogyny, and anti-indigenous sentiment in colonial Latin America as well as in mainstream US society.

Professor Garcia-Caro is an Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of the Latin American Studies Program at the University of Oregon.

OLLI-UO Presents an Insight Seminar Lecture: Literature of the Great War

Tuesday, October 30, 2:00–3:00 p.m.  Alaska-Mexico Room

The horrors of WW I produced an outpouring of British poetry, memoirs and fiction, including Robert Graves’s Goodbye to All That, and Ford Madox Ford’s Parade’s End.  Professor George Wickes will discuss this period as part of OLLI-UO’s continuing collaboration with the UO Insight Seminar program.  Professor Wickes is Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Oregon. His publications include Americans in Paris, The Amazon of Letters, The Memoirs of Frederic Mistral (trans.), and three collections of Henry Miller letters (ed.).

Courses

History of Western Music: The Medieval and Renaissance Periods

Mondays, October 8-November 12, noon–2:00 p.m.  Mexico Room

This six-part series will cover music of the Medieval and Renaissance periods. The series will include presentation and discussion of sacred music, secular music, early polyphony, Art Nova, the Reformation and instrumental music. Composers of these periods include Marchaut, DuFay, Palestrina, Josquin, Gesualdio and Gabrieli.

Series instructor Barbara Myrick currently teaches Music History and Sight-Reading/Ear Training II at Lane Community College as a part-time instructor. She also advises music students. She has performed in countless LCC productions and coordinated many faculty concerts.  She received her Bachelor of Music Education degree from Montana State, after which she taught at Wilsall, Montana. In 1970, she came to the UO, from which she obtained her Master of Music in Piano Performance and her Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Education, Piano and Flute performance. She joined the music faculty at Lane in 1973. In 1981-1983 she took a break and attended the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, where she earned another Master's degree in Musicology, specializing in Performance Practice.

Registration is required for this course.

Understanding Science

Tuesdays, October 2, 16, and 30, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Course

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Topics:

  • October 2: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science—Metaphysics and the Nature of Science— Defining Reality
  • October 16: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science—Mathematics in Crisis
  • October 30: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science—Special Relativity.

Meets: The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The class on Understanding Science begins a new topic called Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science. Class discussions are based on The Great Courses series by Professor Steven Gimbel (c)2015 who brings a lifetime of insight to this historical survey of our models of reality seen through the disciplines of the physical, biological, social sciences and technology. His holistic approach often brings fun examples of how the paths of science and math frequently run parallel to what was being explored in the graphic arts, literature, entertainment, and architecture of the times. How has our understanding of what the universe is and is not changed over time? And what definitions of "reality" help us best comprehend the universe around and within us.Re-experience the Enlightenment. Because Gimbel does not demean previous views of reality, he acts as an advocate for how these ideas could have been held by reasonable people.This course has the potential to help us understand how others experience a different reality—even today.

OLLI-UO Film Series: Politics in America: Hollywood Looks at American Politics and Our Political Process

Mondays, September 10–December 17, 2:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Politics. Love it or leave it, politics is inescapably a part of our lives. It is where our hopes and dreams, our fears and nightmares, our conflicting visions for the future come together and often clash. Small wonder that Hollywood finds the drama inherent in politics—the human conflicts and emotions, the confrontations of personal ambitions and political convictions, and the huge stakes—a rich and apt setting for so many very good films.

Join us in watching a selection of films that illuminate and often critique our politics, our political system, and ourselves in a new OLLI-UO Film Series beginning Monday, September 10, at 2:00 p.m. and thereafter on the first and third Mondays of the month through December 17.

Here is the list of films in this newest, compelling film series:

Writing as Discovery

Tuesdays, September 25–November 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. No meeting October 30. Canada Room

The popular series, Writing as Discovery, is back this fall. Join OLLI- UO member George Kaufman in a six-session writing course that begins September 25.

Writing is a conversation on paper, Kaufman says. Our life experiences make us into teachers, students, and observers, all rolled into one. In this course, you will have an opportunity to draw on your history to write from what you know, get in touch with what you feel, and let your words flow without the constant interference of yourself critic. The class will include ways to jump-start writing when you face a blank page and opportunities to fire up your imagination when it is time to write. There will be opportunities to share what you have written, but only if you choose to share. Some of the elements of writing that will be addressed are metaphor and simile, style, memoir writing, and Haiku. You may wish to read Writing from the Heart by Nancy Aronie or Gabriele Rico’s book, Writing the Natural Way.

Kaufman earned degrees from Columbia University and Yale Law School. He is the author of the book Balancing Life and Work, published by the American Bar Association, and also is the author of Accidental Spirituality, a series of intimate stories about finding extraordinary experiences in everyday life.

Registration is closed for this class.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, October 1, 15, 29, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:00 p.m. Alaska Room

About This Group

Focus: The hour starts with a 20-minute book discussion followed by 30 minutes of silent or guided meditation. The session ends allow for a few minutes of discussion afterwards. Additional articles, podcasts, authors, and internet sites are often shared or recommended for those who care to extend their understanding and deepen their practice.

Meets: Every Monday at noon–1:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday at 12:15–1:45 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine De Martin-Webster

In the first half hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

International Relations

Wednesday, October 3 and 17, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Topics:

  • October 3: Title TBA, Presenter TBA
  • October 17: Title TBA, Presenter TBA

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, October 3 and 17, 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month at 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, October 4 and 18, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, October 4 and 18, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, October 4 and 18, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Topics:

  • October 4: “Catch and Release” by Thomas Lynch (handout)
  • October 18 “Next Door” by Tobias Woolf (handout); “Widow” by Michelle Latiolas (handout)

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room

About This Course

Focus: Understanding the cultural diversity of Italy’s regions

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Topics:

  • September 27: We'll study the geography, history, cultures, economy, local products and food of the Trentino-Alto Adige/South Tyrol region.
  • October 4: We'll begin our study of the Emilia-Romagna region by learning about its geography, Bologna, Ravenna's mosaics and Luciano Pavarotti.
  • October 11: Viva Verdi, a BBC documentary film about the life, works and times of Giuseppe Verdi.
  • October 18: We'll study some poems composed by Romagna poets and then watch Amarcord (part 1), Federico Fellini's semi-autobiographical film based on his youth in 1930s Romagna.   In Italian with English subtitles.
  • October 25: Amarcord (part 2)

Facilitator: Lee Altschuler

Culture Italiane ("Italian cultures") explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. But for those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, October 8 and 22, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

Topics:

  • October 8: Reading Plato’s Philebus with David Kolb—Part Three.
  • October 22: Reading Plato’s Philebus with David Kolb—Part Four.

The Philebus discusses whether the best human life should be devoted to gathering as much pleasure as possible, or to intellectual development and contemplation, and argues for a harmonious mixture of the two. The more abstract parts of the dialogue discuss the role of mixtures, ratios, and measures in constructing our lives.

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday at 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Mondays, October 8 and 22, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. (People are welcome to bring their lunches.)

Note: Solutions will not be meeting on the fourth Monday of this month, September 24

Contact: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, October 10, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Book for October: The Great Train Robbery by Michael Crichton

Meets: The second Wednesdays of each month at 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, October 11 and 25, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers.

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, October 23, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Book for October: Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy

Meets: The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.


November 2018 Courses and Activities

Featured In November

American Character: Lessons from Tocqueville

Wednesday, November 28, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Individualism and volunteerism have special significance for Americans. The two ideas are also often topics of animated debates. According to the French author Alexis de Tocqueville, individualism rightly understood and a healthy sense of volunteerism may be keys to democracy’s success and good citizenship. Drawing on Tocqueville’s discussion of these and related ideas in his famous work Democracy in America and some contemporary discussions, this program provides an opportunity to engage in a thoughtful conversation about these ideas in today’s society. Handouts of related publications will be available.

Prakash Chenjeri is professor of philosophy, chair of the Philosophy Program, and Director of the Democracy Project at Southern Oregon University. While he teaches a variety of courses in philosophy and at the Honors College, his primary interests are political philosophy, scientific literacy and democracy, topics in philosophy of science, and issues in science and religion. Professor Chenjeri speaks on these topics at regional, national and international forums. He lives with his family in Talent, Oregon.

Note: Prof. Chenjeri has provided three selections of optional pre-reading material for this lecture. Due to their length, only several copies will be made. In early November, they will be placed in the Patagonia Room for review.

Lectures

Presenting a Musical Afternoon with Jasper Hitchman

Thursday, November 8, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

A talented young pianist, 13-year-old Jasper Hitchman, will perform some of his own pieces along with many by the masters in a musical afternoon at OLLI-UO. Jasper has been studying classical piano for six years, mostly with Willamette University’s Chris Engbretson. Participating in six Period Festivals sponsored by the Oregon Music Teachers Association, he earned Winner awards six times and also earned first place at the OMTA’s 2017 Sonatina Festival for his performance of Mozart’s Sonata in C Major, k.545. Jasper’s own compositions have been inspired by his classical training and seasoned on the street pianos of Corvallis and Port Townsend.

Jasper, an 8th grader at the Corvallis Waldorf School, has also spent time on the stage. He played the role of Winthrop in The Music Man at McMinnville’s Gallery Theater in 2016, and Tom in The Christmas Foundling at the Very Little Theatre (VLT) in 2017. In his spare time, he enjoys parkour, Irish dance, fencing, and exploring outdoors.

Enjoy a preview by visiting the following links:

Future of Healthcare in Oregon

Tuesday, November 13, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

In advance of the upcoming legislative sessions, Oregon Healthcare Authority (OHA) Director Patrick Allen will discuss the Oregon health care landscape as OHA prepares to launch CCO 2.0 – new contracts with coordinated care organizations that take effect in 2020. Other topics Allen might address include an overview of the OHA and the general future of healthcare in Oregon.

Allen is Director of the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), which is working to improve fundamentally how health care is delivered and paid for, tackling issues that include costs, quality, prevention and health care access. OHA includes most of the state's health care programs, including Public Health and the Oregon Health Plan, the state's innovative Medicaid program. A native Oregonian, he has 25 years in public service, most recently as the director of the Department of Consumer and Business Affairs for six years, where he oversaw the regulation of the commercial insurance market, worker safety and health, the financial services industry, building codes and other services. His guiding principles and charge from Governor Brown are to promote transparency, the wise use of public dollars, and integrity throughout OHA's many programs.

The Wizard of Foz: Dick Fosbury’s One-Man High-Jump Revolution

Wednesday, November 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Bob Welch will present a program based on his book about Dick Fosbury, the former Medford High and Oregon State high-jumper who, amid the tumultuous ‘60s, literally turned his back on the establishment to invent a new style that, 50 years ago this coming fall, won him the gold medal at the 1968 Olympics and revolutionized the world of high jumping. By the 1976 Olympics essentially every high jumper in the world was using the “Fosbury Flop,” which as the go-to style for nearly half a century, has outlasted every bona fide style in history. His book as been described as a . . . ”great read! Bob Welch has the rare ability to provide context to what some might consider to be purely a sports story. He evokes a time and place that many of us remember well, and provides insight for those who came after. This is a ‘history book’ in the best sense of that phrase.” Whether you’re a track nut who has long known of the Fosbury Flop or just have an appetite for a good story, The Wizard of Foz is a fascinating window into one of sports history’s most unlikely revolutionaries.

Bob Welch is an author, speaker, teacher and newspaper columnist from Oregon. He has been a writer and columnist for The Register-Guard for many years and is an adjunct professor at the University of Oregon. He has been honored multiple times by the National Society of Newspaper Columnists and has won many awards, including the Seattle Times C.B. Blethen Award for Distinguished Feature Writing.

Courses

Writing as Discovery

Tuesdays, September 25–November 6, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. No meeting October 30. Canada Room

The popular series, Writing as Discovery, is back this fall. Join OLLI-UO member George Kaufman in a six-session writing course that begins September 25.

Writing is a conversation on paper, Kaufman says. Our life experiences make us into teachers, students, and observers, all rolled into one. In this course, you will have an opportunity to draw on your history to write from what you know, get in touch with what you feel, and let your words flow without the constant interference of yourself critic. The class will include ways to jump-start writing when you face a blank page and opportunities to fire up your imagination when it is time to write. There will be opportunities to share what you have written, but only if you choose to share. Some of the elements of writing that will be addressed are metaphor and simile, style, memoir writing, and Haiku. You may wish to read Writing from the Heart by Nancy Aronie or Gabriele Rico’s book, Writing the Natural Way.

Kaufman earned degrees from Columbia University and Yale Law School. He is the author of the book Balancing Life and Work, published by the American Bar Association, and also is the author of Accidental Spirituality, a series of intimate stories about finding extraordinary experiences in everyday life.

Registration is closed for this class.

History of Western Music: The Medieval and Renaissance Periods

Mondays, October 8-November 12, noon–2:00 p.m. Alaska Room

This six-part series will cover music of the Medieval and Renaissance periods. The series will include presentation and discussion of sacred music, secular music, early polyphony, Art Nova, the Reformation and instrumental music. Composers of these periods include Marchaut, DuFay, Palestrina, Josquin, Gesualdio and Gabrieli.

Series instructor Barbara Myrick currently teaches Music History and Sight-Reading/Ear Training II at Lane Community College as a part-time instructor. She also advises music students. She has performed in countless LCC productions and coordinated many faculty concerts. She received her Bachelor of Music Education degree from Montana State, after which she taught at Wilsall, Montana. In 1970, she came to the UO, from which she obtained her Master of Music in Piano Performance and her Doctor of Musical Arts in Music Education, Piano and Flute performance. She joined the music faculty at Lane in 1973. In 1981-1983 she took a break and attended the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York, where she earned another Master's degree in Musicology, specializing in Performance Practice.

Registration is closed for this class.

From Aztec Empire to Spanish Colony: Roots of the Future Country of Mexico

Mondays, November 19, 26, December 3 and 10; noon–1:00 p.m. Alaska Room

Popular representations of what is known as the conquest of Mexico (1519-1521) often swirl around romantic notions of Spanish conquistadores’ victory and the Aztecs’ inevitable defeat. We will cut through the fog to consider these events in the historical context of Mexico’s indigenous political entities and of Spain’s expansion. Special attention will be given to the siege of the Mexica capital Tenochtitlan as the pivotal event that shaped the subsequent development of Spanish colonies and opened the way for the extension of Spain’s imperial reach to Tierra del Fuego and Asia.

Four weekly one-hour lectures (including Q&A):

  • November 19 The Mexica Empire. Territories, political relations, and conflicts of the numerous military city-states of central Mexico, and the ascendency of the Mexica before the Spanish invasion.
  • November 26 The Spanish Empire. Spain’s expansion following the defeat of the Moors in1492 and Columbus’ voyages. Royal efforts to control the new Caribbean colonies and colonizers. Minor Cuban functionary Hernan Cortez goes rogue to get rich.
  • December 3 The Fall of Tenochtitlan. Nature of Spanish forces invading Mexico and their uneasy occupation of Tenochtitlan, capital of Mexica empire. Spaniards’ growing demands for enrichment, expulsion by Mexica. Spaniards and Mexica’s enemies lay siege to Tenochtitlan and subjugate Mexica to Spanish rule. Native resistance to and cooperation with the Spanish.
  • December 10 The Formation of New Spain. The unfinished business of the Spanish takeover. Cortez’s political battle for royal recognition and legitimacy. The realpolitik of instituting Spain’s formal colonial rule, the role of the indigenous elite and relations among indigenous cultures. Seeds of globalization.

Presenter Ilene O’Malley’s lifelong passion for Mexico began with a hippie backpack tour in 1972. She went on to earn a PhD in Latin American history at the University of Michigan. She was awarded a Fulbright scholarship for her research on the Mexican Revolution, and her resultant book, The Myth of the Revolution, is considered a pioneering work on the role of gender concepts in Mexico’s political culture. She is an OLLI-UO E/S member.

Registration for this course is required and limited to 40.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Mondays, November 5, 19, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information…but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, 10:00–11:00 a.m. Alaska Room

About This Group

Focus: This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana or breath or insight meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

Meets: Every Monday from 10:00–11:00 a.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

The meditation/mindfulness group meets for one hour once a week. The first ½ hour is spent listening to a talk given by a meditation teacher from the Internet. The next ½ hour is spent in silent meditation. There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group; some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this class, some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha.)

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday from 12:15–1:45 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

OLLI-UO Film Series: Politics in America: Hollywood Looks at American Politics and Our Political Process

Mondays, September 10–December 17, 2:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Politics. Love it or leave it, politics is inescapably a part of our lives. It is where our hopes and dreams, our fears and nightmares, our conflicting visions for the future come together and often clash. Small wonder that Hollywood finds the drama inherent in politics—the human conflicts and emotions, the confrontations of personal ambitions and political convictions, and the huge stakes—a rich and apt setting for so many very good films.

Join us in watching a selection of films that illuminate and often critique our politics, our political system, and ourselves in a new OLLI-UO Film Series beginning Monday, September 10, at 2:00 p.m. and thereafter on the first and third Mondays of the month through December 17.

Here is the list of films in this newest, compelling film series:

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine De Martin-Webster

In the first half-hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half-hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Understanding Science

Tuesdays, November 6 and 20, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Topics:

  • November 6: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science–The Reality of Atoms–Quantum Mechanics
  • November 20: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science–Quantum Field Theory–Chaos Theory

Meets: The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The class on Understanding Science begins a new topic this fall called Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science. Class discussions are based on The Great Courses series by Professor Steven Gimbel (c)2015 who brings a lifetime of insight to this historical survey of our models of reality seen through the disciplines of the physical, biological, social sciences and technology. His holistic approach often brings fun examples of how the paths of science and math frequently run parallel to what was being explored in the graphic arts, literature, entertainment, and architecture of the times. How has our understanding of what the universe is and is not changed over time? And what definitions of "reality" help us best comprehend the universe around and within us? Re-experience the Enlightenment. Because Gimbel does not demean previous views of reality, he acts as an advocate for how these ideas could have been held by reasonable people. This course has the potential to help us understand how others experience a different reality—even today.

International Relations

Wednesday, November 7 and 21, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Topics:

  • November 7: The International Space Station: Science in Space

    Captain Wendy Lawrence is a retired naval aviator and NASA astronaut. As a helicopter pilot, she made several deployments to the North Atlantic, Indian Ocean and Kenya, making over 800 shipboard landings. After earning a master’s degree in ocean engineering from MIT and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Lawrence was selected as an astronaut in 1992 and worked at NASA for 14 years.

    A veteran of four shuttle missions (STS-67, 86, 91 and 114), she has logged over 50 days in space. Her last flight was the first Shuttle “Return to Flight” mission following the loss of the orbiter Columbia and her crew. This flight evaluated new procedures for inspection and repair of the shuttle orbiter’s thermal protection system.

    Currently, Lawrence works part-time at Space Camp and the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, informing the public about NASA’s spaceflight programs and participating in STEM education programs.

  • November 21: China's Foreign Policy: A Personal View

    China is building roads and ports around the world, building military bases on artificial islands in disputed seas, buying technology companies in Europe, and drilling for oil off South America. What does this all add up to? Long-time China hand Morton Holbrook will share his perspective on what China is trying to achieve with its political and economic relations with countries around the globe.

    Morton Holbrook is a retired US diplomat with deep experience in China, having served in Taipei, Beijing (twice), and Shenyang. He also dealt with China in postings in Tokyo, Manila, Paris, and Washington, DC. In China, he helped open the US Embassy in Beijing in 1979, and later served as US Consul General in Shenyang.

    Following retirement from the State Department, he was Professor at United International College in Zhuhai, China, where he was the head of the Government and International Relations program for five years. From 2013 until 2016, he was Executive Director of the Hong Kong America Center, in Hong Kong.

    Mr. Holbrook is currently an Adjunct Professor at Brescia University and at Kentucky Wesleyan College in his hometown of Owensboro, Kentucky, where he teaches courses on US Foreign Policy and International Law. Mr. Holbrook holds a BA in economics and international relations from Vanderbilt University, an MA in Chinese language and history from University of Michigan, a JD from University of Chicago Law School, and an LLM from Columbia University Law School.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, November 7 and 28; 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m. Note: this month, the group will meet on November 28 instead of November 21.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, November 1 and 15, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, November 1 and 15, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Topics:

  • November 1: Is Capitalism Opposed to Environmentalism?
  • November 15: Washington, D.C. Voting Rights and Statehood

Contact: Jerry Brule

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, November 1 and 15, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Topics:

  • November 1: TBD
  • November 15: TBD

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room

About This Course

Focus: Understanding the cultural diversity of Italy’s regions

Meets: Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Topics:

  • October 25: Amarcord (part 2)
  • November 1: Food and art in Emilia-Romagna
  • November 8: Molise: geography, culture, food and history
  • November 22: no meeting
  • November 15: Sardinia: geography and culture.
  • November 29: Sardinia's history and part 1 of Padre Padrone. This film “follows the story of young, barely literate shepherd boy Gavino who lives under the thumb of his tyrannical peasant father.” Based on the autobiography of the Sardinian writer Gavino Ledda. In 1977 Padre Padrone won the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival.

Facilitator: Lee Altschuler

Culture Italiane ("Italian cultures") explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. For those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, November 12 and 26, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

Topics:

  • November 12: Reading Plato’s Philebus without David Kolb—Part Three
  • November 26: Reading Plato’s Philebus with David Kolb—Part Four

The Philebus discusses whether the best human life should be devoted to gathering as much pleasure as possible, or to intellectual development and contemplation, and argues for a harmonious mixture of the two. The more abstract parts of the dialogue discuss the role of mixtures, ratios, and measures in constructing our lives.

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.; No meeting on November 22

Facilitator: Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Monday, November 12 and 26, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Topics:

  • November 12: Tiny Houses/Affordable Housing
  • November 26: Election Reform

Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, November 14, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Book for November: Palisades Park by Alan Brennert (fiction)

Meets: The second Wednesday of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, November 8, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m. Note: no meeting on November 22.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic, and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, November 27, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Book for November: The True Believer by Eric Hoffer

Meets: The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Fourth Friday OLLI-UO Meet and Greet

Friday, November 23, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Ax Billy Grill, Downtown Athletic Club

Rest up from overeating at Thanksgiving Dinner! Take a break from Black Friday shopping! Join OLLI-UO friends, old and new, for our monthly Meet and Greet. Order a beverage and a bite to eat if you wish or just relax and join in the conversation and fun of being together.

If you plan to attend, please register for this month with Linda Rockey. Check your membership directory or contact the Continuing and Professional Education Office for contact information. Due to space considerations, attendance is limited to 30. Your RSVP helps us (and the DAC) plan the event. Check out the Ax Billy Grill Happy Hour Menu for this no host event. Don’t miss out; sign up today!

A note on the schedule for upcoming Meet and Greets: December’s fourth Friday falls on the 28th, and OLLI-UO will be closed for Winter Break. So, after Friday, November 23, there will be no Meet and Greet until January 2019.

Coming in December

OLLI-UO Town Hall with UO Vice President Roger Thompson

Wednesday, December 5 12:15–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

UO Vice President Roger Thompson will provide a Student Services and Enrollment Management (CPE’s home division) update and make opening remarks about the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon. Then, Vice President Thompson will take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation. Members in Central Oregon will join Eugene/Springfield members for the session via videoconferencing.

Winter Holiday Celebration

Thursday, December 13 1:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico-Canada Room

Celebrate the holidays with your OLLI-UO friends! A fee of $10 for this event will help cover the cost of savory and sweet fare, as well as a selection of non-alcoholic beverages. Registration will open in late November. Come join the fun!

Power-Up Your Charitable Giving with Estate and IRA Planning

Wednesday, December 19 12:00–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

UO Director of Development in the Office of Gift Planning Mike Ritchey provides an introduction of what he does for UO, and how his office can work with our OLLI-UO members specifically, as we work towards our financial sustainability goals.

The session will begin with general education on estate planning (including wills, trusts, designating beneficiaries, tax treatment of assets, etc.) and one specific type of estate asset, the IRA. From there, we’ll look at how these two areas can be used to meet the charitable goals you have. Topics will include using required minimum distributions from IRAs to support charitable giving, the charitable IRA rollover (also known as a qualified charitable distribution), characteristics of assets (real estate, stock accounts, IRAs, etc.) to consider when making charitable gifts, and more. There will be plenty of time for questions, so bring yours along!

Mike Ritchey holds degrees in Finance (BS ’80) and Marketing (MBA ’81) from the UO and earned the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) certification in 1991. Prior to joining the UO in 2011, he spent over 20 years working in the personal financial planning profession. Mike was born and raised in Springfield, Oregon, is married to a retired middle school teacher, and represents the middle of three generations of his family to earn UO degrees.

Mike will give the same presentation to our OLLI-UO in Central Oregon counterparts on December 12.


December 2018 Courses and Activities

OLLI-UO Town Hall with UO Vice President Roger Thompson

Wednesday, December 5 12:15–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

UO Vice President Roger Thompson will provide a Student Services and Enrollment Management (CPE’s home division) update and make opening remarks about the value of lifelong learning and community engagement programs in the division’s goal of sustaining campus and community connections in Oregon. Then, Vice President Thompson will take questions from members from both program sites during the second part of his presentation. Members in Central Oregon will join Eugene/Springfield members for the session via videoconference.

Power-Up Your Charitable Giving with Estate and IRA Planning

Wednesday, December 19 12:00–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

UO Director of Development in the Office of Gift Planning Mike Ritchey provides an introduction of what he does for UO, and how his office can work with our OLLI-UO members specifically, as we work towards our financial sustainability goals.

The session will begin with general education on estate planning (including wills, trusts, designating beneficiaries, tax treatment of assets, etc.) and one specific type of estate asset, the IRA. From there, we’ll look at how these two areas can be used to meet the charitable goals you have. Topics will include using required minimum distributions from IRAs to support charitable giving, the charitable IRA rollover (also known as a qualified charitable distribution), characteristics of assets (real estate, stock accounts, IRAs, etc.) to consider when making charitable gifts, and more. There will be plenty of time for questions, so bring yours along!

Mike Ritchey holds degrees in Finance (BS ’80) and Marketing (MBA ’81) from the UO and earned the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) certification in 1991. Prior to joining the UO in 2011, he spent over 20 years working in the personal financial planning profession. Mike was born and raised in Springfield, Oregon, is married to a retired middle school teacher, and represents the middle of three generations of his family to earn UO degrees.

Mike will give the same presentation to our OLLI-UO in Central Oregon counterparts on December 12. Light refreshments will be served.

Lectures

The Biology Behind Production of Alcoholic Beverages

Tuesday, December 4, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Designed to present the microbiology and biochemistry behind the making of wines, beers, and spirits, this course requires no previous academic background beyond high school. This is not a ”how-to” course, but home brewers will benefit from a better understanding of the processes involved. No alcohol will be permitted and no samples will be served. However, participants will be able to enjoy this talk by OLLI-UO E/S member Jim Novitsky, who recently presented the popular presentation on Time: Does anyone really know what time it is? Dr. Novitsky holds a PhD and an MBA and is a former university lecturer.

Oregon Humanities Conversation Project—Fish Tales: Traditions and Challenges of Seafood in Oregon

Monday, December 10, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Oregonians love local food, but finding truly local fish can be hard, even on the coast. We’re now much more aware of ethically grown meat and vegetables, but seafood remains somewhat mysterious. How does that crab get from the ocean to our table, and what’s the true cost of cheap salmon at the grocery store? This conversation with food writer Jennifer Burns Bright engages with our complex relationship with American seafood. From cultural traditions to economic and ethical challenges, from the docks to the markets, we’ll explore ways to apply our food values to the products of the sea. OLLI-UO in E/S will host this Oregon Humanities Conversation Project event, and it is free and open to the public, so please invite friends.

Jennifer Burns Bright is a food educator and travel writer based in Astoria, Oregon. She moved to the coast after many years teaching literature at the University of Oregon, where she researched modernism and desire, led a faculty research group in the emerging discipline of food studies, and won a national pedagogy award for a team-taught, interdisciplinary class on bread. She holds a PhD from the University of California at Irvine and a Master Food Preserver certification from OSU Extension. When she's not out gathering seaweed or fermenting fruit, she might be found interviewing young farmers, old pirates, and mad scientists.

Frontiers of Passion in Modern Fiction: E.M. Forster, his Novel Maurice, and Coming Out Ahead of One's Time

Wednesday, December 12, 2:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Throughout his long career as novelist, essayist, commentator, and sage, E.M. Forster (1879-1970) kept his gayness hidden from the general public. How was it, then, that he managed to complete, in 1914, a draft of a magnificent novel about the heroic and yet ordinary man, Maurice, who not only does come out in homophobic England but affirms his choice by partnering, happily, with a gamekeeper Alec? How did Forster change his manuscript, which he suppressed until his death, and what message do Forster's life and novel carry for us today?

Presenter Henry Alley is a Professor Emeritus of Literature in the Honors College at the University of Oregon. Professor Alley has published over 40 stories in such journals as Seattle Review, Cimarron Review, Oxford Magazine, Harrington Gay Men's Quarterly Fiction, Webster Review, Outerbridge, and Virginia Quarterly Review. He has published articles of literary criticism in such journals as Kenyon Review, Papers on Language and Literature, Studies in the Novel, Twentieth Century Literature, and The George Eliot Fellowship Review. His latest novel, Men Touching, is slated for release in 2019.

The presentation is an introduction to a series he will present for the Insight Seminars.

Bob Dylan’s Poetry

Tuesday, December 18, 2:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2016. Does this make him a great poet—or even a poet? Does it matter? In this presentation we’ll talk about poetry (What makes a poem a poem?) and we’ll talk about Dylan (What makes Dylan Dylan?), and we’ll see how the twain meet. We’ll also talk about influences on Dylan, and the very idea of influence—and look at some of the charges leveled against Dylan (by Joni Mitchell and others), calling him a plagiarist and a fake.

Of course, we’ll listen to and discuss a few songs. Come prepared to jump into the action. What’s your favorite Dylan? What lines, passages, or songs do you think are especially “poetic”? You’ll have plenty of opportunity to share.

After two previous degrees at Duke University, presenter Jeff Harrison earned his PhD at the University of Oregon, studying with teachers like Jim Earl, George Wickes, and Bill Rossi, fellow leaders of Insight Seminars. He remembers the first time he heard “Like a Rolling Stone,” sitting in the back seat of the car his mom was driving down Highland Ave. in Jackson, Tennessee, in the summer of ’65. He didn’t manage to see Dylan until the big tour in ’74 with The Band, but he has seen him many times since. For a couple of years, he worked alongside Bill Strange, who taught the first Dylan course at a major university, here at UO from ’75 ‘til ’95, and he has taught his own Dylan course at LCC since 2009. He is a fan, but he’s working hard at being a scholar, in spite of what Dylan has said about Dylan scholars.

The presentation is an introduction to a series he will present for the Insight Seminars.

Personal Stories Photographing the Yom Kippur War from the Frontlines

Wednesday, December 19, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

In 1973, OLLI-UO in Eugene/Springfield member Nathan Fendrich had recently arrived in Israel when the Yom Kippur War broke out. Armed with press credentials from KEZI, he travelled in press buses, hired press cars, and embedded himself with Israel Defense Forces (IDF), taking hundreds of pictures of air strikes, ground skirmishes, prisoners of war and soldiers in battle and at rest between the fighting. Nathan has recently donated his unique collection to the National Library of Israel (NLI) to be used for research by military historians, made available to the public, and preserved for future generations.

In a talk enhanced by his captivating photographs, Fendrich will describe the extraordinary set of circumstances that put him on the frontlines of another country’s battle for survival and share his first-person accounts of living through and documenting the war. OLLI-UO E/S member Avi Naiman, will present the process by which Nathan’s photographic testimonies came to the attention of the curators of the NLI and IDF archives, explain why the collection is so unique and valuable, and describe how the photos are now being used to improve the historical record of the Yom Kippur War.

A handful of media outlets have been invited to attend this event, and video and photographs may be taken to support news stories. Nathan’s experience during the Yom Kippur War and his connection with Avi at an OLLI-UO discussion group was previously covered by The Register-Guard.

Courses

From Aztec Empire to Spanish Colony: Roots of the Future Country of Mexico

Mondays, November 19, 26, December 3 and 10; noon–1:00 p.m. Canada Room

Popular representations of what is known as the conquest of Mexico (1519-1521) often swirl around romantic notions of Spanish conquistadores’ victory and the Aztecs’ inevitable defeat. We will cut through the fog to consider these events in the historical context of Mexico’s indigenous political entities and of Spain’s expansion. Special attention will be given to the siege of the Mexica capital Tenochtitlan as the pivotal event that shaped the subsequent development of Spanish colonies and opened the way for the extension of Spain’s imperial reach to Tierra del Fuego and Asia.

Four weekly one-hour lectures (including Q&A):

  • November 19 The Mexica Empire. Territories, political relations, and conflicts of the numerous military city-states of central Mexico, and the ascendency of the Mexica before the Spanish invasion.
  • November 26 The Spanish Empire. Spain’s expansion following the defeat of the Moors in1492 and Columbus’ voyages. Royal efforts to control the new Caribbean colonies and colonizers. Minor Cuban functionary Hernan Cortez goes rogue to get rich.
  • December 3 The Fall of Tenochtitlan. Nature of Spanish forces invading Mexico and their uneasy occupation of Tenochtitlan, capital of Mexica empire. Spaniards’ growing demands for enrichment, expulsion by Mexica. Spaniards and Mexica’s enemies lay siege to Tenochtitlan and subjugate Mexica to Spanish rule. Native resistance to and cooperation with the Spanish.
  • December 10 The Formation of New Spain. The unfinished business of the Spanish takeover. Cortez’s political battle for royal recognition and legitimacy. The realpolitik of instituting Spain’s formal colonial rule, the role of the indigenous elite and relations among indigenous cultures. Seeds of globalization.

Presenter Ilene O’Malley’s lifelong passion for Mexico began with a hippie backpack tour in 1972. She went on to earn a PhD in Latin American history at the University of Michigan. She was awarded a Fulbright scholarship for her research on the Mexican Revolution, and her resultant book, The Myth of the Revolution, is considered a pioneering work on the role of gender concepts in Mexico’s political culture. She is an OLLI-UO E/S member.

Registration is required for this course.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Mondays, December 3 and 17 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room; no meeting on December 31

About This Group

Focus: Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

Meets: The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Livvie Taylor-Young

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO's Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information . . . but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other's projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you'd bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, 10:00–11:00 a.m. Alaska Room; no meeting on December 24 and 31

About This Group

Focus: This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana or breath or insight meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

Meets: Every Monday from 10:00–11:00 a.m.

Facilitator: Janice Friend

The meditation/mindfulness group meets for one hour once a week. The first half hour is spent listening to a talk given by a meditation teacher from the Internet. The next half hour is spent in silent meditation. There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group; some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this class, some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha.)

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room; no meeting on December 24 and 31

About This Group

Focus: Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

Meets: Every Monday from 12:15–1:45 p.m.

Facilitator/Teacher: Sara Michener

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond "hola" for "hello" or if you're quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. I like to use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

OLLI-UO Film Series: Politics in America: Hollywood Looks at American Politics and Our Political Process

Mondays, September 10–December 17, 2:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Politics. Love it or leave it, politics is inescapably a part of our lives. It is where our hopes and dreams, our fears and nightmares, our conflicting visions for the future come together and often clash. Small wonder that Hollywood finds the drama inherent in politics—the human conflicts and emotions, the confrontations of personal ambitions and political convictions, and the huge stakes—a rich and apt setting for so many very good films.

Join us in watching a selection of films that illuminate and often critique our politics, our political system, and ourselves in a new OLLI-UO Film Series beginning Monday, September 10, at 2:00 p.m. and thereafter on the first and third Mondays of the month through December 17.

Here is the list of films in this newest, compelling film series:

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room; no meeting on December 24 and 31

About This Group

Focus: Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

Meets: Every Monday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Facilitator: Elaine De Martin-Webster

In the first half-hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half-hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

Understanding Science

Tuesdays, December 4 and 18, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Topics:

  • December 4: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science: Quantum Field Theory; Chaos Theory
  • December 18: Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science: Dark Matter and Dark Energy; Grand Unified Theories

Meets: The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

The class on Understanding Science begins a new topic this fall called Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science. Class discussions are based on The Great Courses series by Professor Steven Gimbel (c)2015 who brings a lifetime of insight to this historical survey of our models of reality seen through the disciplines of the physical, biological, social sciences and technology. His holistic approach often brings fun examples of how the paths of science and math frequently run parallel to what was being explored in the graphic arts, literature, entertainment, and architecture of the times. How has our understanding of what the universe is and is not changed over time? And what definitions of "reality" help us best comprehend the universe around and within us. Re-experience the Enlightenment. Because Gimbel does not demean previous views of reality, he acts as an advocate for how these ideas could have been held by reasonable people. This course has the potential to help us understand how others experience a different reality—even today.

International Relations

Wednesday, December 5 and 19, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

About This Group

Focus: International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

Topics:

  • December 5: Emmanuel Macron: The Man and His Vision
    Presenter: Helene-Carol Brown
  • December 19: TBD

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitators: Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, December 5 and 19; 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room; note: 4:00 p.m. start time on December 19

About This Group

Focus: The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play's merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

Meets: The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

Facilitator: Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, December 6 and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room

About This Group

Focus: Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Charles Castle

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, December 6 and 20, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

Topics:

  • December 6: Social Media - does the good outweigh the isolation, alienation, and lies?
  • December 20: Education reform, Common Core and free college

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. People are welcome to bring their lunches.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, December 6 and 20, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

Topics:

  • December 6: “The Sheriff’s Children” by Charles Chesnutt
  • December 20: “A Child’s Christmas in Wales” by Dylan Thomas (handout)

Meets: The first and third Thursdays of each month from 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Facilitator: Shiela Pardee

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room; no meeting on December 27

About This Course

Focus: Understanding the cultural diversity of Italy’s regions

Meets: Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

Topics:

  • December 6: Padre Padrone (part 2) This film “follows the story of young, barely literate shepherd boy Gavino who lives under the thumb of his tyrannical peasant father.” Based on the autobiography of the Sardinian writer Gavino Ledda. In 1977 Padre Padrone won the Golden Palm award at the Cannes Film Festival. In Italian with English subtitles.
  • December 13: We'll learn about recent developments in Sardinia, its food and its environment.
  • December 20: We'll begin our study of Lombardy by learning about the region's geography, economy, Milan and Claudio Monteverdi.
  • December 27: No meeting

Facilitator: Lee Altschuler

Culture Italiane ("Italian cultures") explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy's 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d'Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. For those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

Philosophy Salon

Monday, December 10, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room; no meeting on December 24

About This Course

Focus: A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

Topics:

  • December 10: Plato's Philebus with David Kolb, continued.
  • December 24: No meeting

The Philebus discusses whether the best human life should be devoted to gathering as much pleasure as possible, or to intellectual development and contemplation, and argues for a harmonious mixture of the two. The more abstract parts of the dialogue discuss the role of mixtures, ratios, and measures in constructing our lives.

Meets: The second and fourth Monday of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Contact: Henry Sholar

Facilitators: Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

Meets: Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.; No meeting on December 27

Facilitator: Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

Solutions

Monday, December 10, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room; no meeting on December 24

About This Group

Focus: Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Topics:

  • December 10: The Changing Nature of War - from Battleships to Cyberwarfare
  • December 24: No meeting

Meets: The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

Contact: Jerry Brule

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, December 12, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

Book for December: TBD

Meets: The second Wednesday of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Facilitator: Joyce Churchill

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

News and Views

Thursday, December 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room; no meeting on December 27

About This Group

Focus: Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

Meets: The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Moderator: Rotated among a team of volunteers

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Classics/Philosophy

Friday, December 21, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room; Note: this is a special meeting date for December

About This Group

Focus: The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

Book for December: Cannery Row by John Steinbeck

Meets: The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Contact: Sheila Patterson

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Silver Showcase Anthology Launch Event

Tuesday, December 11 2:00–4:00 p.m. Canada-Mexico Room

In honor of its 25th Anniversary year, OLLI-UO in Eugene/Springfield has published an anthology to showcase its members' creativity. After months of hard work, the Silver Showcase will be released and celebrated on December 11th at 2:00 p.m. in the Canada/Mexico Room at a special book launch party.

Pre-ordered copies will be available for pickup at the event, and there'll be a very limited number of unspoken-for copies available on a first-come, first-served basis at the original posted price of $22.50.

This is a free and open party and no registration is required—you needn’t have purchased an anthology to attend. You are cordially invited to come on out and meet many of the authors and artists who contributed to the project, get your copy signed, enjoy a mini Author's Reading, and celebrate the talents of fellow OLLI-UO members. Light refreshments will be served. No registration required.

Winter Holiday Celebration

Thursday, December 13 1:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico-Canada Room

You are cordially invited to celebrate the holidays with your OLLI-UO friends! A 2018 Eugene/Springfield awards program will be featured, as well as festive live music by our own Phyllis Villec. A fee of $10 for this event will help cover the cost of savory and sweet holiday reception fare, as well as a selection of non-alcoholic beverages. Come join the fun!

Register online, by calling 541-346-0697, or in person at the CPE office.