Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

OLLI-UO Moves Online Due to COVID-19

All in-person OLLI-UO programming is currently suspended in both Central Oregon and Eugene/Springfield. Email osher@uoregon.edu for more information about online learning opportunities offered by OLLI-UO. Get help using Zoom with OLLI-UO.

Eugene/Springfield Program Schedule

Current Eugene/Springfield program offerings are listed below. Select each title listed below to see the full class or activity description. Visit the calendar page if you prefer viewing offerings in a calendar format. A list of current Shared Interest Groups can be found on the SIGs page. An archive of past offerings can be viewed in the archive.

Lectures

Offered as series or stand-alone sessions, these dynamic presentations are typically taught by university faculty, community experts, and OLLI-UO members. The lecture format consists of a presentation followed by lively discussion.

The Space Between Us–Immigrants, Refugees, and Oregon: OLLI-UO Hosts a Conversation Project Event

TBD

Global displacement is on the rise, thanks to intractable conflicts, economics, and climate change. Oregonians have seen and will continue to see the results of international migration in our neighborhoods. In this conversation, Manuel Padilla, who has worked with refugees in Haiti, Chad, and Washington, DC, asks participants to consider questions of uprootedness, hospitality, identity, perception, and integration and how we might build more informed, responsive, resilient, and vibrant communities.

Manuel Padilla is project manager at the National Policy Consensus Center and is a teacher and consultant in the areas of dialogue, conflict transformation, social change, and international aid and development. He has a BA in philosophy from Portland State University; an MA in peace, conflict, and development studies from the UNESCO Chair for the Philosophy of Peace; and has done peace building and human rights work both domestically and internationally. His professional interest is rooted in his deep spiritual desire to use group processes to foster cultures of encounter and vulnerability, transform conflict, and build civil society.

OLLI-UO is pleased to partner with Oregon Humanities on this session, which is free and open to the public.

Is That a Service Dog?

TBD

Ever wonder what exactly a service dog is or how they come to do the job they do? Presenters John Longchamps and Carmaleta Aufderheide of Canine Companions for Independence® (CCI) will discuss the processes CCI uses for raising these exceptional dogs (e.g. what is a puppy raiser?), common disabilities supported, and some stories of the how the lives of the people they serve are enhanced. They also will discuss the difference between assistance, therapy, and emotional support dogs, as well as the impact of fraudulent service dogs.

Longchamps is an OLLI-UO member and is raising his second CCI dog, Blair. Aufderheide is co-president of the CCI Cascade Chapter. In addition, she is a Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner (KPA CTP), a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT-KA), and Dogsafe Canine First Aid Certified. Her master’s thesis research was in the human-animal bond. She is raising her second CCI dog, Zuri. They plan to have Blair and Zuri in attendance. CCI provides highly trained assistance dogs, free of charge, to people with disabilities, and is the largest provider of assistance dogs in the world.

Geography of Tea

TBD
Photograph of Susan Walcott

The Geography of Tea traces the global spread of Camellia sinensis to become the world's second most consumed beverage, cultivated from Orkney to Argentina, Africa to Asia. Along with tea’s transformative impact on world history, this talk focuses on the American experience and how to grow and process your own.

Susan Walcott is a Professor of Geography Emerita at the University of North Carolina-Greensboro, and formerly at Georgia State University in Atlanta. Research interests concern regional economic development, particularly in rapidly transitioning areas throughout Asia. Books, chapters and articles focus on high technology parks and industry clusters (life science, furniture, tea) across the U.S. and China, modernization in Bhutan, and immigrant entrepreneurs.

This lecture is open to members of the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History.

Design and Construction of Eugene's Iconic Pedestrian Bridges

TBD

Eugene is graced with three iconic pedestrian bridges, the Peter DeFazio Bridge, the Interstate 5 Gateway Bridge, and Delta Ponds Bridge. OLLI-UO member Gary Rayor will discuss the design and construction of these bridges in a series of three lectures and three field trips. He was Engineer of Record for two of these bridges and design quality control lead for the third. The PowerPoint presentations to be used at the lectures were originally given at professional engineering society meetings.

This program is designed in a hybrid lecture-field trip format. Each lecture has a corresponding field trip to the bridge site, two days after the lecture. All field trips will be held at the bridges, starting 2:00 p.m. and lasting about 45 minutes. Registration and liability waivers are required for the field trips.

See more details in the Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events Section, below.

Peter DeFazio Bridge, Tuesday, March 31

The bridge was constructed in 1998 and consists of a unique innovative suspension bridge system that has recently gained use in other similar bridges in the US, UK, and Europe. With a main span of 338 feet, the bridge has won three national awards for design excellence. Gary Rayor was the Engineer of Record for this project.

Interstate 5 Gateway Bridge, Tuesday, April 14

Constructed in 2011, this bridge consists of a unique cable-stayed bridge system that was also used in the Delta Ponds bridge and other bridges in the US. The main spans are 105 feet. The bridge has won two national awards for design excellence. Gary Rayor was the Engineer of Record for this project.

Delta Ponds Bridge, Thursday, April 28

This session will explore the Delta Ponds Bridge’s unique innovative cable-stayed bridge system that was also used in the I-5 Gateway Bridge. The bridge was constructed in 2015 and has won four national awards for design excellence. Gary Rayor was design quality control lead for this project.

Black Cultural Heritage and the Politics of Diversity in Colombia

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

History of Music, Part II

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Finishing without Finality: Innovation in Closure in the Songs of Fanny Hensel

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Dale Chihuly: Maestro of the Molten

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Deep Sleep for Old Brains

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

From Hope to Horror: Diplomacy and the Making of the Rwanda Genocide

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Ecstatic Devotion: Musical Rapture and Erotic Death

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Cold War Co-eds to Pioneering Professors: The Forgotten Study of Japanese Women Who Studied in the U.S.

TBD

Complete description coming soon.

Town Hall Meeting with Roger Thompson

TBD

Join your fellow OLLI-UO members for a conversation and Q&A session with Dr Roger Thompson, UO vice president for Student Services and Enrollment Management (SSEM). SSEM is the division that houses the department of Continuing and Professional Education (CPE). OLLI-UO is a program of CPE.

Dr. Thompson will provide an update on SSEM and an overview of its current initiatives, followed by a conversation/question and answer session.

About the Speaker

Dr. Roger J. Thompson is the Vice President for Student Services and Enrollment Management for the University of Oregon. He is responsible for services that contribute to enhancing the student experience, recruitment, retention, and graduation. His portfolio also includes providing online and continuing education for the community. During his tenure, enrollment at the University of Oregon has reached record levels for total enrollment, academic quality, diversity, including ethnicity, socio-economic, and international representation, and freshmen-to-sophomore retention rates.

Roger has been a frequent presenter at national and regional conferences throughout the country and has published in the areas of college choice, student persistence, student success, and affordability issues in higher education. Additionally, Roger serves on the statewide Board of Directors for Special Olympics Oregon.

A native Oregonian, Roger served in similar positions at Indiana University and the University of Alabama prior to joining the UO. He earned his doctorate in Higher Education Policy and Administration from the University of Southern California.

Courses

Courses cover topics in-depth from four to twelve weeks and may encourage additional reading or preparation. Registration is usually required as seating is limited.

The Determinants of Economic Inequality and Vertical Mobility

TBD

Complete description coming soon. Registration required; no wait list.

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Tours and field trips offer opportunities to explore cultural and community resources, both locally and regionally. Registration is usually required to participate, and additional fees may be applied to cover the costs of transportation or admission.

Fourth Friday OLLI-UO Meet and Greet

Fourth Fridays, 2:00–4:00 p.m., Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar, Downtown Athletic Club
ABOUT THIS GROUP

The Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar of the Downtown Athletic Club is available to us the fourth Friday of every month, between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. Order a beverage and a bite to eat if you wish and visit a while. Try it sometime and check out the Happy Hour Menu for this no host social.

Please stop in and visit for a bit–we always have a nice, fun group of people who enjoy a strictly social OLLI-UO event! Remember, making friends and building community is essential for our mental health!

MEETS

2020 Meet and Greet Dates

  • January 24
  • February 28
  • March 27
  • April 24
  • May 22
  • June 26
  • July 24
  • August 28
  • September 25
  • October 30
  • November 27
  • December (No Meeting)

Design and Construction of Eugene’s Iconic Pedestrian Bridges

TBD

Eugene is graced with three iconic pedestrian bridges, the Peter DeFazio Bridge, the Interstate 5 Gateway Bridge, and Delta Ponds Bridge.

OLLI-UO member Gary Rayor will discuss the design and construction of these bridges in a series of three lectures and three field trips. He was Engineer of Record for two of these bridges and design quality control lead for the third.

This program is designed in a hybrid lecture-field trip format. Each lecture has a corresponding field trip to the bridge site, two days after the lecture. All field trips will be held at the bridges, starting 2:00 p.m. and lasting about 45 minutes. Registration and liability waivers are required for the field trips.

See more details in the Lectures Section, above.

Peter DeFazio Bridge Field Trip, Thursday, April 2

The bridge was constructed in 1998 and consists of a unique innovative suspension bridge system that has recently gained use in other similar bridges in the US, UK, and Europe. With a main span of 338 feet, the bridge has won three national awards for design excellence. Trip leader Gary Rayor was the Engineer of Record for this project.

This field trip will meet on the DeFazio Bridge to view the bridge and details of construction and discuss questions.

Registration and liability waiver required. Liability waivers available at the related lectures and in the CPE Office in Room 110 of the Baker Downtown Center.

Interstate 5 Gateway Bridge Field Trip, Thursday, April 16

Constructed in 2011, this bridge consists of a unique cable-stayed bridge system that was also used in the Delta Ponds bridge and other bridges in the US. The main spans are 105 feet. The bridge has won two national awards for design excellence. Trip leader Gary Rayor was Engineer of Record for this project.

This field trip will meet on the I-5 Gateway Bridge to view the bridge and details of construction and discuss questions.

Registration and liability waiver required. Liability waivers available at the related lectures and in the CPE Office in Room 110 of the Baker Downtown Center.

Delta Ponds Bridge Field Trip, Thursday, April 30

Attendees will explore the Delta Ponds Bridge’s unique innovative cable-stayed bridge system that was also used in the I-5 Gateway Bridge. The bridge was constructed in 2015 and has won four national awards for design excellence. Trip leader Gary Rayor was design quality control lead for this project.

This fild trip will meet on the Delta Ponds Bridge to see the bridge and details of construction and discuss questions.

Registration and liability waiver required. Liability waivers available at the related lectures and in the CPE Office in Room 110 of the Baker Downtown Center.

Guided Tour of the UO Museum of Natural and Cultural History

TBD

Join OLLI-UO and MNCH members for a special, guided tour of the museum's signature exhibits. Delve into Oregon's natural history and geology in the Explore Oregon exhibit. Explore 14,000 years of Native American history in Oregon—Where Past is Present. At the tour's conclusion, participants are invited to explore additional exhibits on their own—including Racing to Change: Oregon's Civil Rights Years and Natural Athletes: Track & Field Champs of the Animal Kingdom. Registration required.

A Taste of OLLI-UO

TBD

Bring a friend and join the fun for this open to the public, membership drive event! Complete description coming soon.

Study and Discussion Groups

These groups are designed to be an informal exchange of ideas in a considerate atmosphere. Study groups topics are well-defined and explored in-depth.

Creative Writing Critique

First, Third, and Fifth Mondays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO’s Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information . . . but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other’s projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you’d bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

FOCUS

Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

FACILITATOR

Livvie Taylor-Young

Philosophy Salon

Second and Fourth Mondays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT

Given the crises we currently live amidst, both nationally and internationally, Salon members have elected to learn about the history of modern political philosophy to help us better understand the theories and traditions that have influenced the current situation. We’re going to plunge into the nitty-gritty theories of civil life, society and government.

This will be a 36-lecture Great Courses DVD series. We will learn from an excellent lecturer—Prof. Lawrence Cahoone. At each meeting, we watch two lectures, one each hour. The lectures are about 30 minutes, and allows 30 minutes or so discussion before a short break, and then another lecture and discussion the second hour.

FOCUS

A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

TOPICS
  • January 13: Locke on Limited Government and Toleration, Rousseau’s Republican Community
  • January 27: Kant’s Ethics of Duty and Natural Rights, Smith and the Market Revolution
  • February 10: Montesquieu and the American Founding, Debating the French Revolution
  • February 24: Legacies of the Revolution—Right to Left, Nationalism and a People's War
  • March 9: Civil Society—Constant, Hegel, Tocqueville, Mill on Liberty and Utility
  • March 23: Marx’s Critique of Capitalism, Modern vs. Traditional Society
  • April 13: Progressivism and New Liberalism, Fleeing Liberalism—Varieties of Socialism
  • April 27: Fleeing Liberalism—Fascism and Carl Schmitt, Totalitarianism and Total War
  • May 11: Conservative or Neoliberal—Oakeshott, Hayek, Reviving the Public Realm—Hannah Arendt
  • May 25: Philosophy vs. Politics—Strauss and Friends, Marcuse and the New Left
  • June 8: Rawls’s A Theory of Justice, Ayn Rand, Robert Nozick, Libertarianism
  • June 22: What about Community?, Walzer on Everything Money Shouldn’t Buy
  • July 13: Identity Politics—Feminism, Identity Politics—Multiculturalism
  • July 27: The Politics of Nature—Environmentalism, Postmodernism, Truth, and Power
  • August 10: Habermas—Democracy as Communication, The End of History? Clash of Civilizations?
  • August 24: Just Wars? The Problem of Dirty Hands, Why Political Philosophy Matters
FACILITATORS

Jeffrey Allen, Milton Janetos, and Henry Sholar

Solutions

Second and Fourth Mondays, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

TOPICS
  • January 13: Education
  • January 27: Domestic Violence
  • February 10: Critical Thinking
  • February 24: The Green New Deal
  • March 9: Extreme Weather
  • March 23: Capitalism V the Environment
  • April 13: FEMA and Emergency Response
  • April 27: Undocumented Immigrants
  • May 11: Pandemics
  • May 25: Unhealthy Lifestyles
  • June 8: Alternative Medicines
  • June 22: Differences between Liberals and Conservatives
CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon-1:00 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

The meditation/mindfulness group meets for one hour once a week. The first half hour is spent listening to a talk given by a meditation teacher from the Internet. The next half hour is spent in silent meditation. There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group; some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this class, some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha.)

FOCUS

This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana or breath or insight meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

FACILITATOR

Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond “hola” for “hello” or if you’re quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. We use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

FOCUS

Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

FACILITATOR/TEACHER

Sara Michener

OLLI-UO Film Series: “On the Road Again – Movies about Traveling and Exotic Locations”

First and Third Mondays, January 6–July 6, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
JANUARY 6: The Motorcycle Diaries, 2004, Introduced by Susan Walcott

23-year old Ernesto “Che” postpones his last semester of medical school to accompany his friend, Alberto, on a four-month, 8,000 km motorcycle trip from Buenos Aires to the Guajira Peninsula in Venezuela that profoundly affects what he wants to do with his life. Cast: Gael Garcia Bernal, Rodrigo de la Serna, Mía Maestro Rating: Run Time: 126 MINS

JANUARY 20: NO Film – OLLI-UO CLOSED FOR MARTIN LUTHER KING, Jr. DAY
FEBRUARY 3: Midnight in Paris, 2011, Introduced by Craig Starr

A successful screenwriter who is struggling with his first novel travels to Paris with his fiancé and her family, where he falls in love with the city, but his romantic notions are not shared by his fiancé.  During midnight walks, he has encounters with Paris’ past and the “lost generation” that bring him closer to the heart of the city, but further from the woman he’s about to marry. Cast: Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Kathy Bates, Corey Stoll, Adrien Brody Rating: PG-13  Run Time: 94 MINS

FEBRUARY 17:  The Road to Morocco, 1942, Introduced by John Attig

Two carefree guys adrift on a raft in the Mediterranean are cast ashore and find their way to an Arabian Nights City.  When one is sold to the beautiful princess Shalmar, the other tries to save his friend, even if it means taking his place as the princess’ slave.  But neither figures on the desert chieftain Mullay Kassim, who has designs on the princess himself. Cast: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy Lamour, Anthony Quinn Rating: Not Rated Run Time: 82 MINS

MARCH 2: The Big Year, 2011, Introduced by Andy Walcott

Three men criss-cross the North America in pursuit of a Big Year – a record number of bird-sightings in a calendar year – to earn the title of Birder of the Year, but Life keeps getting in the way. Cast: John Cleese, Owen Wilson, Jack Black, Steve Martin, Rosamund Pike, Kevin Pollak, Joel McHale, JoBeth Williams Rating: PG  Run Time: 100 MINS

MARCH 16: Lost in Translation, 2003, Introduced by Howard Schuman

Two Americans – an aging actor past his prime and the 22-year old wife of a photographer on assignment in Japan – meet in Tokyo, where they help each other deal with their feelings of loss and with the cultural barriers they experience in Tokyo. Cast: Bill Murray, Scarlett Johannson, Giovanni Ribisi, Akiko Takeshita Rating: PG  Run Time: 102 MINS

APRIL 6: The Bucket List, 2007, Introduced by Meta Maxwell

Two terminally ill patients, a corporate billionaire and a working class mechanic, decide to leave the hospital room they share and do all the things they have ever wanted to do before they die.  In the process, they become unlikely friends and ultimately find joy in life. Cast: Jack Nicholson, Morgan Freeman, Sean Hayes, Beverly Todd Rating: PG-13  Run Time: 97 MINS

APRIL 20: Under the Tuscan Sun, 2003, Introduced by Susan Walcott  

A literature professor and author, struggling with her latest book and with her husband’s infidelity, joins her friend on a tour of Tuscany, where she ditches the tour and buys an aged, fixer-upper villa.  As she deals with obstacles in her new surroundings, she finds a productive and happy life and the possibility of rediscovering romantic love. Cast: Diane Lane, Raoul Bova, Sandra Oh, Lindsay Duncan Rating: PG-13  Run Time: 113 MINS

MAY 4: Roman Holiday, 1953, Introduced by John Attig 

While on a goodwill tour of Europe, Princess Ann, who hates her regimented life and craves a little freedom from the spotlight, disguises herself as a commoner and slips away from her handlers in Rome.  She meets an American news reporter who recognizes her but hides that fact so he can escort her around Rome during her day of freedom and get a scoop.  Cast: Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck, Eddie Albert Rating: Not Rated  Run Time: 118 MINS

MAY 18: The Year of Living Dangerously, 1982, Introduced by Howard Schuman

A neophyte Australian journalist’s humdrum assignment in Indonesia turns hot as the political situation turns volatile, and he is increasingly drawn into events through his relationship with his photographer, a supporter of President Sukarno, and his affair with a British embassy staffer.   Cast: Mel Gibson, Sigourney Weaver, Linda Hunt, Bembol Roco, Michael Murphy Rating: PG  Run Time: 115MINS

JUNE 1: Topkapi, 1964, Introduce by Meta Maxwell

Enjoy the journey to exotic Istanbul, where a small-time con man is caught between a gang of world-class jewel thieves who plan to steal an emerald-encrusted dagger from the Topkapi Museum and the Turkish secret police who think they are terrorists planning an assassination.  Cast: Melina Mercouri, Peter Ustinov, Maximillian Schell, Robert Motley Rating: Not Rated  Run Time: 120 MINS

JUNE 15: Two for the Road, 1967, Introduced by Andy Walcott

As Joanna and her architect husband drive from their London home to St. Tropez for the unveiling of a house he designed for a client, they recall, in flashbacks, their courtship and their now rocky 10-year marriage together, including tensions that led both to extramarital affairs. Cast: Audrey Hepburn, Albert Finney, Eleanor Bron Rating: Not Rated  Run Time: 111 MINS

JULY 6: Walkabout, 1971, Introduced by Craig Starr

The son and daughter of a British family living in Sydney find themselves stranded while on a picnic in the Outback.  With only the clothes on their back and a few personal possessions, they try to find their way back, and they encounter an aboriginal boy on his walkabout, a rite of passage in which he spends months on his own living off of the land, who tries to help them survive, even though he cannot understand their language or their apparent need to return to civilization. Cast: Jenny Agutter, Luc Roeg, David Gulpilil, John Meillon Rating: GP  Run Time: 100 MINS

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

In the first half-hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half-hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

FOCUS

Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

FACILITATORS

Elaine De Martin-Webster and Thomas Walker

Understanding Science

First, Third, and Fifth Tuesdays, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

On December 5th we begin a new series called: What Darwin didn't Know. The Modern Science of Evolution. Writing the final pages of his masterpiece The Origin of Species, Charles Darwin looked ahead to the work yet to be done on his groundbreaking theory of evolution by natural selection. “In the distant future,” he predicted, “I see open fields for far more important researches.”

Darwin was right as evolution has emerged as the fundamental concept in all of biology, explaining Earth’s endlessly diverse organisms while spawning new disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, and evolutionary medicine.

The course is taught by Dr. Scott Solomon who is an Associate Teaching Professor at Rice University, where he teaches ecology, evolutionary biology, and scientific communication. He received his PhD in Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior from The University of Texas at Austin, where his research explored the evolutionary origins of biodiversity in the Amazon basin. Fluent in Spanish and Portuguese, he has worked as a visiting researcher with the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. and with São Paulo State University in Rio Claro, Brazil.

There are 24 lectures in the series.

FOCUS

To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

TOPICS
  • January 7: Lecture 5 - Geology and Genes: The Geography Of Life and Lecture 6 -Genetic Drift: When Evolution Is Random
  • January 21: Lecture 7 - Rapid Evolution Within Species and Lecture 8 - Evolution In The Lab
  • January 21: Lecture 7 - Rapid Evolution Within Species and Lecture 8 - Evolution In The Lab
  • February 4: Lecture 9 - The Many Origins of Species and Lecture 10 - Cambrian Explosion to Dinosaur Extinction
  • February 18: Lecture 9 - The Many Origins of Species and Lecture 10 - Cambrian Explosion to Dinosaur Extinction
  • March 3: Lecture 13 - Evolution Doesn't Repeat, But it Rhymes and Lecture 14 - The Evolution of Extreme Life
  • March 17: Lecture 15 - Imperfect Nature: Ad Hoc Body Designs and Lecture 16 - The Sterile Worker Paradox
  • March 31: Lecture 17 - Coevolution: Peace Accords and Arms Races and Lecture 18 - Microbiomes: Evolution with Small Partners
  • April 7: Lecture 19. The Evolution of Brains and Behavior and Lecture 20. The Evolution of Sex and Parenting
  • April 21: Lecture 21. The Evolution of Aging and Death and Lecture 22. Evolutionary Medicine
  • May 5: Lecture 23. Gene Editing and Directed Evolution and Lecture 24. The Future of Human Evolution
Facilitators

Barbara Nagai and Mike Rose

Classics Book Group

Fourth Tuesday, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

We meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month to discuss a classic book, usually at least fifty years old, which was important when published and remains significant today. For example, we read a collection of Anton Chekov's short stories which are as fresh today as written. At times we make exceptions to the fifty-year guideline. Usually the person who nominates a title leads discussion of that book plus gives a brief biography of the author and times when the book was written. We alternate fiction one month with nonfiction the next.

FOCUS

Read and discuss classic fiction and nonfiction.

TOPICS
  • Book for January: The Razor's Edge by W. Somerset Maugham
  • Book for February: The Origins of Totalitarianism by Hannah Arendt
  • Book for March: Solaris by Lem Stanislaw
  • Book for April: The Puritan Dilemma: The Story of John Winthrop by Edmund S. Morgan
  • Book for May: Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markadaya
  • Book for June: The Snow Leopard by Peter Matthiessen
  • Book for July: Billy Budd Foretopman by Herman Melville
CONTACT

Sheila Patterson

International Relations

First and Third Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

FOCUS

International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

TOPICS
  • January 1: No Meeting
  • January 15: Geography of Wine with Randy Stokes, Manager of Sundance Wine Cellars
  • February 5: Deciphering US interests in North Africa - and does it matter?
  • February 19: ICSP student panel
  • March 4: U.S. Nuclear Modernization: Is $1.7 Trillion for New Nuclear Weapons Necessary?
  • March 18: Central Asia
  • April 8: Thailand
  • April 22: Letter from London: Brexit
  • May 6: TBA
  • May 20: The Philippines: Del Rosarios Panel + Great Decisions
  • June 3: Brazil
  • June 17: Hong Kong
FACILITATORS

Susan Walcott and Howard Schuman

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Second Wednesday, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

FOCUS

The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

TOPICS
  • Book for January: Varina by Charles Frazier (fiction)
  • Book for February: Pale Rider: The Spanish Flu of 1918 and How It Changed the World by Laura Spinney (nonfiction)
  • Book for March: The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende (fiction)
  • Book for April: Caravans by James Michener (fiction)
  • Book for May: Leonardo DaVinci by Walter Isaacson (biography)
FACILITATOR

Joyce Churchill

Interpretive Play Reading

First and Third Wednesdays, 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the “director” and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

FOCUS

The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play’s merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

FACILITATORS

Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Poetry on Wheels

First, Third, and Fifth Thursdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

FOCUS

Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

FACILITATOR

Group Facilitated

News and Views

Second and Fourth Thursdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

FOCUS

Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

MODERATOR

Rotated among a team of volunteers

Thinking Allowed

First and Third Thursdays, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

TOPICS
  • January 2: No Meeting
  • January 16: TBA
  • February 6: TBA
  • February 20: The National Debt
  • March 5: Eugene Police Chief Chris Skinner (special session; see listing in Lectures section for details)
  • March 19: Overpopulation
  • April 2: Racism and the Legacy of Slavery
  • April 16: Education Reform
  • May 7: Reducing Hunger and Malnutrition
  • May 21: Infrastructure
  • June 4: Nuclear Power
  • June 18: Homelessness
  • July 2: Volcanic Winter
CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Drop-in Meditation Time

Thursdays, 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A shared period of silence with a bit of social connection on both sides.

FOCUS

Becoming comfortable with resting in the presence of others with awareness and acceptance.

Note: period of shared silence between 12:10 and 12:50 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Shared

CONTACT

Don Schneider

Short Story Discussions

First and Third Thursdays, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

FOCUS

Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

TOPICS
  • January 2: No Meeting
  • January 16: The Passage Bird by Deborah Willis (Handout)
  • February 6: Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin
  • February 20: Mary Ventura and the Ninth Kingdom by Sylvia Plath (handout)
  • March 5: A Late Encounter with the Enemy by Flannery O'Connor and The Shawl by Cynthia Ozick
  • March 19: At the Round Earth's Imagined Corners by Lauren Groff

All selections, unless otherwise indicated, are from The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd edition, edited by Joyce Carol Oates. Stories marked “handout” will be made available at the CPE office in Room 110.

FACILITATORS

Shiela Pardee and Anne Pacheco

Cinema Italiano

Second, Fourth, and some Fifth Thursdays, 2:30–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS COURSE

In this study and discussion group, we watch and discuss a variety of films: 1) classic and contemporary Italian films; 2) documentary films related to Italy; and 3) American-Italian films. All Italian-language films have English subtitles. Each film is preceded by a brief introduction and followed by a short discussion, as time allows.

FOCUS

Learning about Italy by watching Italian films

TOPICS
  • January 23: La Strada. Federico Fellini’s 1954 classic has been called “a magical tale of love, loss and loneliness.” The film stars Fellini’s wife Giulietta Masina, Anthony Quinn and Richard Basehart. La Strada won an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. 97 minutes.
  • January 30: No Meeting
  • February 13: Pavarotti. Ron Howard’s 2019 documentary film about Luciano. 114 minutes
  • February 27: Nuovomondo (Golden Door) The film's website describes Nuovomondo as "a moving yet unsentimental film of mythic resonance which tells the story of the early years of mass Italian immigration to the United States." The New York Times review called it "a beautiful dream of a film," whose achievement is "to immerse the modern viewer in a way of perceiving the world that has nearly been forgotten." 112 minutes. English-language trailer.
  • March 12: March 12: Cristo si è fermato a Eboli (Christ Stopped at Eboli) This 1979 movie, based on writer Carlo Levi's 1945 memoir, tells the story of Levi's 1935 expulsion by the Fascist authorities to a poor village in southern Italy and his experiences there. In 1983, the film won the BAFTA Award for Best Foreign Language Film. 118 minutes. Trailer with English subtitles.
  • March 26: La Meraviglie (The Wonders) "A family of Tuscan beekeepers find their idyll interrupted by the arrival of a troubled teenage boy after their daughter enters a competition to appear on a television show." (Wikipedia). English film critic Mark Kemode commented that "terrific performances from the ensemble cast bring warmth and insight to this Cannes Grand Prix winner about an alt-lifestyle family eking out a breadline existence as beekeepers in the Tuscan wilds." 2014. 111 minutes
  • April 9: La Meglio Gioventù (The Best of Youth). Part 1. 2003. 2 hours. La meglio gioventù is a family saga set in Italy from 1966 through 2003. It chronicles the life of an Italian family but focuses primarily on two brothers, Matteo and Nicola, documenting their journey from the prime of their wild youth in the mid-1960s counterculture to parenthood and retirement in the early 2000s. The film shows the interaction of the personal and the political, and the ways in which small events may become turning points in the important choices made by individuals." (Wikipedia) Film reviewer David Edelstein commented: "The Best of Youth doesn't have a boring millisecond. It isn't an art film; it's a mini-series with the sweep of a classic novel, with tons of plot . . . This is the sort of movie you'll recommend to friends and they’ll go, "Six hours! Are you nuts?" and then call you up and thank you in the middle of the night."
  • April 23: La Meglio Gioventù Part 2. 2 hours.
  • April 30: La Meglio Gioventù Part 3. 2 hours.
FACILITATOR

Lee Altschuler

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

FOCUS

Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

FACILITATOR

Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Fifth Thursdays/Sharing Personal Experiences

Fifth Thursday, 10:00-11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Once a year, group members suggest topics they would like to discuss with each other. These topics are voted on by the entire group. Those with the most votes begin the new year and continue on until completed. Examples of topics: How travel experiences changed your life?, Growing up in America, what changes have you experienced in how society views male/female roles?; What teacher/mentor had the greatest impact on your life and how?; Are you an extrovert or an introvert and how has that impacted your life both positively and negatively?; As a youth, what were your thoughts about growing old and how do they compare with what you’ve experienced so far?

FOCUS

Sharing our personal life experiences through open discussion.

TOPIC
  • January 30: Think about a historical person who is very important to you. It could be anyone . . . from Attila the Hun or King Tut to Bernie Sanders or Michelle Obama. Each participant will explain a little about the person they chose and why they are important to you.
  • April 30: TBD
  • July 30: TBD
  • October 29: TBD
FACILITATOR

Skip Berlin


 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon