Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
Continuing and Professional Education

Eugene/Springfield Courses and Activities

Current Eugene/Springfield course offerings are listed below. Course and activity descriptions for the following month will be published mid-month. Minor edits of topics and facilitators will be updated at the end of the month.

Members will be notified of monthly updates and critical changes via email. We encourage you to check both the course and activity descriptions and the course calendar at the middle and end of the month! Important announcements, like the President's Note and other notifications, will be published as information is available (up to twice per month).

June 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured in June

OLLI-UO Film Series “Ride ‘Em Cowboy: Great Westerns Through the Years”

Mondays, June 17–December 16 2:00-4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
Black and white image of cowboy on a horse.
JUNE 17: Stagecoach, 1939, Introduced by Craig Starr

Strangers brought together on an Overland Stagecoach ride must deal with their animosities and petty differences, confront their own fears and demons, and face danger from warring Apaches led by Geronimo. A Western classic by John Ford. Cast: John Wayne, Claire Trevor, Andy Devine, John Carradine. Rating: Not Rated Run Time: 96 MINS

JULY 1: Red River, 1948, Introduced by Howard Schuman

A Texas cattleman leads a cattle drive, the culmination of over 14 years of hard work and struggles, to the market in Missouri. But his stubborn and tyrannical behavior along the way leads to a mutiny, led by his adopted son. Cast: John Wayne, Montgomery Clift, Joanne Dru, Walter Brennan, Colleen Gray, Harry Carey, John Ireland. Rating: Passed Run Time: 133 MINS

JULY 15: High Noon, 1952, Introduced by John Attig

Marshal Will Kane learns that Frank Miller, whom he sent to prison years earlier, is arriving on the noon train, together with members of his gang. But as the Marshal prepares for the showdown with Miller, his newlywed wife begs him to just leave town as they had originally planned, and the townspeople whom he has protected for years turn their backs on him and refuse to help. Cast: Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly, Lloyd Bridges, Harry Morgan, Lon Chaney, Jr. Rating: PG Run Time: 85 MINS

August 5: The Magnificent Seven, 1960, Introduced by Susan Walcott

Poor Mexican farmers whose village has long been plagued by a local bandit seek help from a ragtag collection of American gunmen, each with his own reason for coming to the aid of the villagers. Cast: Yul Brenner, Eli Wallach, Steve McQueen, Charles Bronson, Horst Buchholz, Robert Vaughn, James Coburn, Brad Dexter. Rating: Approved Run Time: 128 MINS

August 19: Blazing Saddles, 1974, Introduced by Meta Maxwell 

Mel Brooks’ raucous parody of Hollywood Western movies. In order to ruin a western town so he can buy up property in the railroad’s right of way, a corrupt white politician appoints a black sheriff, who promptly becomes his most formidable adversary. Cast: Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder, Madeline Kahn, Harvey Korman, Mel Brooks, Slim Pickens, Alex Carras. Rating: R Run Time: 93 MINS

September 2: NO FILM – OLLI-UO CLOSED FOR LABOR DAY OBSERVANCE
September 16: The Searchers, 1956, introduced by Andy Walcott

A Confederate veteran, already consumed by his hatred of Indians, sets out on a quest to avenge the massacre of his brother’s families by a band of Commanches and to find his niece whom they kidnapped. But as he continues his search over five years, his belief that his niece has been tainted by living among the Indians for so long raises concerns about his motives. Cast: John Wayne, Jeffrey Hunter, Vera Mills, Natalie Wood, Ward Bond Rating: Passed Run Time: 119 MINS

October 7: My Darling Clementine, 1946, Introduced by Craig Starr

John Ford’s classic telling of the clash between the Earp brothers, Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan, and the vicious Clanton clan, which led to the shoot-out behind the OK Corral in Tombstone, Arizona. Cast: Henry Fonda, Linda Darnell, Victor Mature, Walter Brennan, Ward Bond, John Ireland. Rating: Not Rated Run Time: 97 MINS

October 21: The Professionals, 1966, Introduced by Howard Schuman

An arrogant Texas millionaire hires four mercenaries to rescue his wife from a notorious Mexican bandit, but as they search, they find reason to question whether the wife was actually kidnapped. Cast: Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan, Woody Strode, Jack Palance, Claudia Cardinale, Ralph Bellamy. Rating: PG-13 Run Time: 117 MINS

November 4: Jeremiah Johnson, 1972, Introduced by Meta Maxwell  

A former Army scout looks to make a quiet home for himself in the Colorado mountains, but he inadvertently is drawn into a conflict with neighboring Crow Indians that threatens to forever change the peaceful relationship he worked so hard to achieve with his neighbors and the land. Cast: Robert Redford, Will Geer, Delle Bolton. Rating: GP Run Time: 108 MINS

November 18: Cat Ballou, 1965, Introduced by John Attig

Balladeers Stubby Kaye and Nat “King” Cole provide musical accompaniment to this tongue-in-cheek ballad of Catherine “Cat” Ballou, who becomes an outlaw and enlists the help of a washed-up, drunk gunslinger and a handsome bandit to get vengeance on the land-development company whose hired gun killed her father. Cast: Jane Fonda, Lee Marvin, Michael Callan, Dwayne Hickman, Stubby Kaye, John Marley, Nat “King” Cole. Rating: Not Rated Run Time: 97 MINS

December 2: Pale Rider, 1985, Introduced by Susan Walcott

A mysterious preacher rides into a gold mining camp in the California foothills, and protects the prospectors and their families from a greedy mining company that is trying to steal their claims. Cast: Clint Eastwood, Michael Moriarty, Carrie Snodgress, Richard Dysart. Rating: R Run Time: 115 MINS

December 16: McCabe and Mrs. Miller, 1971, Introduced by Andy Walcott

A gambler, John McCabe, and a prostitute, Mrs. Miller, become business partners in a remote Old West mining town, and their enterprise thrives until the town’s mining deposits attract the attention of a large corporation. McCabe’s decision to refuse the corporation’s buy-out offer has major repercussions for him, Mrs. Miller, and the town. Cast:  Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Rene Auberonoise, William Devane, Shelly Duvall, Keith Carradine. Rating: R Run Time: 120 MINS

Lectures

Miracle Planet: The 4.6 Billion-Year History of Our Home World

Tuesdays, May 7, 14, 21, 28, and June 4, Noon–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

This five-part series will feature programs from the Discovery Channel, with a short introduction and optional discussion after the video. Learn about recent discoveries on how the world was made, how life began and was nearly wiped out by numerous catastrophes, and eventually thrived long enough to make us. These vividly gorgeous films were created by the National Film Board of Canada with NHK Japan.

The weekly programs will cover:

  • The Violent Past;
  • Snowball Earth;
  • New Frontiers for Life;
  • Extinction Events and Rebirth;
  • Survival of the Mammals and Origins of Humans

Host Barb Shaw earned an MS in physiology at Georgetown, was and still occasionally is a science writer, led the Eugene Astronomical Society for three years, and has had a continuing interest in how it all began in Big History, the long story of where we come from.

Successful Aging

Wednesday, June 5, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Dr. Mark Traines, an OLLI-UO E/S member will discuss current findings on the study of healthy aging, including those of the MacArthur Foundation Study of Successful Aging. His talk will entail rationales for such studies and for the “notion of heterogeneity of human aging.” He also will highlight recommendations for healthy aging, based on current literature.

Traines is a geriatrician who trained at The Mount Sinai School of Medicine and had academic appointments with Brown University, the University of Rhode Island, and the University of Oregon. He also was program director for the Fellowship in Geriatric Medicine (2008-2014) at the Oregon Health Sciences University. His interests lie in the role of sense of control as it pertains to well-being, as well as geriatric rehabilitation.

Investigating American Presidents

Tuesdays, June 11, 18, and 25, July 2, 9, and 16, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Canada Room

What are the limits, if any, on presidential power? This six-part DVD series from Great Courses will explore this timely question, covering the history of presidential investigations; separation of power; Watergate and special prosecutors; presidential abuse of privilege; pardon power; presidential lies and coverups; and the law and politics of impeachment. Each of the six sessions will include two 30-minute lectures, with time afterward for discussion. These lectures are described as “evenhanded” and “detailed yet accessible” to those with only a basic understanding of how the U.S. government and the justice system work. OLLI-UO members Catherine Koller and Dina Wills will facilitate discussion.

Presenter Paul Rosenzweig has clerked at the U.S. Appellate Court, is a fellow at a public think tank in Washington, D.C., is an advisor to the American Bar Association’s standing committee on Law and National Security and is currently a professor at George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C.

Cuba, Libre?: Documentary Film

Tuesday, June 11, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

This award-winning documentary film traces the history of travel to Cuba by Americans in the pre-Castro 20th century and after the 1991 fall of Cuba’s big benefactor, the Soviet Union, through about mid-2015. Since its release in January 2016, the film has been an Official Selection on over 20 film festivals and award competitions and is under consideration by many more. It has won 11 awards, including two for “Best Documentary,” and has aired on more than 50 community television stations.

Film producer Dick Jordan is a freelance travel writer. Over the past five years, he has produced more than 30 films, most short and travel related, for community television stations.

Aging Forward

Wednesday, June 12, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Living options for those 60+ have changed dramatically in the past decades and will be altered even more dramatically as 77 million “boomers” give way to 99 million “millennials.” As we age forward how can we create the living experience that we want, as well as fund it?

Barbara Susman, MSW, will present this talk and facilitate an open discussion. She is marketing director of Cascade Manor, where she was a board member from 1999 to 2002. She also led the Lane Community College Successful Aging Institute and OASIS Education Center. The Successful Aging Institute strives to enhance the lives of mature adults and those who serve them.

Rebounding Malaria and the Ethics of Eradication: The World Health Organization’s 1950s Campaign and Implications for Today

Wednesday, June 19, 2:00–4:00 p.m.  Alaska-Mexico Room

During the 1950s, the World Health Organization attempted a global effort to eradicate malaria, which resulted in widespread failures of this campaign in Africa. Narrowing in on the history of malaria elimination attempts on the East African island of Zanzibar, presenter Melissa Graboyes will take a close look at the WHO’s activities on the island in 1958-1968 and the epidemic rebound malaria that struck the island afterwards. WHO scientists recognized from the beginning that Zanzibar’s elimination attempt was unlikely to succeed but publicly blamed Zanzibari workers, institutions, and community members for the many problems that arose, Graboyes says. Despite knowing the potential of rebound malaria early on, scientists failed to plan responsibly for measures to lessen the burden on local people.

Graboyes will focus on ethical questions emerging around the loss of acquired immunity, how local communities understand the potential risks, and how international global health groups plan responsible exit strategies. The historical case study is framed in the light of Zanzibar’s current malaria elimination activities, led by the Gates Foundation and the US-funded President’s Malaria Initiative. Her research is based on extensive work in the Zanzibar National Archives and the WHO archives in addition to interviews and observations in Zanzibar. Graboyes is Assistant Professor of History in the Robert Donald Clark Honors College.

Chios Eastern Shore Response Team

Wednesday, June 26, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Greece, because of its geographic position at the crossroads of three continents, is a country of reception or transit for asylum seekers in Europe. During the past few years Greece has experienced an unprecedented influx of refugees and migrants. In this presentation, Geraldine Moreno Black will relate her personal experiences while volunteering for three weeks with the Chios Eastern Shore Response Team. In addition, the talk will include an overview of the refugee situation while she was there in Greece and specifically Chios, recent changes that have happened in Greece, and insights from conversations she had with Greeks in Chios and Athens. She is a retired Professor of Anthropology at the University of Oregon.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Mondays, June 3 and 17, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO’s Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information . . . but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other’s projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you’d bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

FOCUS

Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

MEETS

The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

Livvie Taylor-Young

OLLI-UO Film Series: Lots of Laughs: Great Hollywood Comedies Through the Years

Mondays, January 7–June, 3 2:00-4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
JANUARY 7: BRINGING UP BABY, 1938, INTRODUCED BY CRAIG STARR

A classic romantic comedy of errors occurs when Cary Grant’s reserved, quiet paleontologist keeps crossing paths with Katherine Hepburn’s zany, flighty, and often irritating heiress. Things come to a head when Hepburn’s pet leopard, Baby, escapes and she ropes Grant into helping with the chase. Cast: Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Charles Ruggles

JANUARY 21: NO FILM

UO and OLLI-UO closed in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

FEBRUARY 4: ANNIE HALL, 1977, INTRODUCED BY SUSAN WALCOTT

A twice-divorced, neurotic, and intellectual Jewish stand-up comic in New York reflects on his on-again, off-again relationship with a ditzy, insecure, Midwest WASP who wants to be a nightclub singer. This is a funny and often endearing reflection on romance, relationships, and pop culture. Cast: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Carol Kane, Paul Simon, Shelley Duvall

FEBRUARY 18: A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, 1935, INTRODUCED BY JOHN ATTIG

Classic comic chaos and tomfoolery ensue when a sly business manager and his two wacky friends try to help two opera singers achieve success while humiliating their stuffy, snobbish adversaries. Cast: Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones

MARCH 4: MY FAVORITE YEAR, 1982, INTRODUCED BY HOWARD SCHUMAN

A junior writer on a mid-50’s top-rated variety/comedy show is assigned to baby-sit that week’s guest star – a dissolute, past-his-prime swashbuckling movie actor with a drinking habit – and ensure that he appears for the show. Cast: Peter O’Toole, Mark Linn-Baker, Jessica Harper, Joseph Bologna, Lainie Kazan

MARCH 18: THE 100-YEAR OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED, 2013, INTRODUCED BY ANDY WALCOTT

After a long and colorful life, a man escapes on his 100th birthday from the nursing home where he has been stuck, and begins an unexpected, humorous, and heart-warming journey. Cast: Robert Gustafsson, Iwar Waklander, David Wiberg

APRIL 1: THE MOUSE THAT ROARED, 1959, INTRODUCED BY CRAIG STARR

In this zany satire, the world’s smallest country–the impoverished Duchy of Grand Fenwick–is in an economic crisis and so declares war on the United States with the intention of surrendering after one day in the hope that the U.S. will provide vast financial aid to rebuild the country. Cast: Peter Sellers, Jean Seberg, William Hartnell, Leo McKern

APRIL 15: BEING THERE, 1979, INTRODUCED BY SUSAN WALCOTT

A biting and darkly satiric look at politics and the rich and powerful. A simple-minded, illiterate gardener with little knowledge of the world has a chance encounter with a businessman and his wife, who take his simple homilies for deep insight and wisdom, thereby becoming the businessman’s confidante and advisor and a political insider. Cast: Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, Richard Dysart, Richard Basehart

MAY 6: THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT, 1951, INTRODUCED BY JOHN ATTIG

A humble and altruistic chemist develops a fabric which never gets dirty or wears out, to the dismay and horror of the fabric industry, both owners and labor, who try to suppress his discovery. Cast: Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood, Cecil Parker

MAY 20: WOMAN OF THE YEAR, 1942, INTRODUCED BY HOWARD SCHUMAN

The relationship between rival reporters who are married to each other and work on the same newspaper becomes strained when she is elected “woman of the year” in recognition of her feminist activities and advocacy. Cast: Katherine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy, Fay Bainter, Willilam Bendix

JUNE 3: BEST IN SHOW, 2000, INTRODUCED BY ANDY WALCOTT

A film crew follows around the quirky owners and handlers of five show dogs as they prepare for and arrive at the Mayflower Kennel Club Dog Show. The dog show brings out their all-too-human foibles as we all wait to see who will be Best in Show. Cast: Fred Willard, Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Bob Balaban

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon-1:00 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

The meditation/mindfulness group meets for one hour once a week. The first half hour is spent listening to a talk given by a meditation teacher from the Internet. The next half hour is spent in silent meditation. There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group; some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this class, some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha.)

FOCUS

This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana or breath or insight meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

MEETS

Every Monday from noon-1:00 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond “hola” for “hello” or if you’re quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. We use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

FOCUS

Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

MEETS

Every Monday from 12:15–1:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR/TEACHER

Sara Michener

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

In the first half-hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half-hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

FOCUS

Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

MEETS

Every Monday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Elaine De Martin-Webster and Thomas Walker

Understanding Science

Tuesday, June 4 and 18, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Understanding Science will begin a new lecture series titled: Understanding the Quantum World. Class discussions are based on the Great Courses series by Professor Erica W. Carlson, PhD. (c 2109). Quantum mechanics has a reputation for being so complex that the word "quantum" has become popular label for anything mystical or unfathomable. In fact, quantum mechanics is one of the most successful theories of reality yet discovered, explaining everything from the stability of atoms to the glow of neon lights, form the flow of electricity in metals to the workings of the human eye. There are 24 lectures in the series.

FOCUS

To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

TOPICS
  • June 4: The Internet and Virtual Reality; Data Analytics
  • June 18: Particle Wave Duality. Particles; Waves, and Interference Patters.
MEETS

The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

International Relations

Wednesday, June 5 and 19, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

FOCUS

International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

TOPICS
  • June 5: International Cooperation on the Environment with presenter Davis Jones (via Skype)
  • June 19: Burying the Countess with presenter Bill Taliaferro.
MEETS

The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATORS

Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, June 5 and 19, 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the “director” and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

FOCUS

The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play’s merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

MEETS

The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, June 6 and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

FOCUS

Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

MEETS

The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

group facilitated

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, June 6 and 20, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

TOPICS
  • June 6: Citizenship Requirements
  • June 20: Humor in America
MEETS

The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches.

CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, June 6 and 20, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

FOCUS

Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

TOPICS
  • June 6: TBD
  • June 20: TBD

All selections, unless otherwise indicated, are from The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd edition, edited by Joyce Carol Oates. Stories marked “handout” will be made available at the CPE office in Room 110.

MEETS

The first and third Thursdays of each month from 1:30–3:00 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Shiela Pardee and Anne Pacheco

Drop-in Meditation Time

Thursdays, 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A shared period of silence with a bit of social connection and sharing on both sides. There is no right or wrong way to do it.

FOCUS

Becoming comfortable with resting in the presence of others with awareness and acceptance.

MEETS

Every Thursday from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Note: period of shared silence between 12:10 and 12:50 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Shared

CONTACT

Jean Novitsky

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS COURSE

Culture Italiane (“Italian cultures”) explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy’s 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d’Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. For those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

FOCUS

Understanding the cultural diversity of Italy’s regions

TOPICS
  • June 6: Galileo Galilei and The Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems; Italy's Republic Day
  • June 13: Leonardo da Vinci; valedictory video visits to Tuscany and Florence
  • June 20: Basilicata’s geography and economy; Andrea Bocelli (part 1)
  • June 27: Food and culture of Basilicata; Andrea Bocelli (part 2)
MEETS

Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Lee Altschuler

Philosophy Salon

Monday, June 10 and 24, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
FOCUS

A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

TOPICS
  • June 10: "Wittgenstein's turn to ordinary language" and "Quine and the end of positivism"
  • June 24: "New philosophies of science" and "Derrida's deconstruction of philosophy"
MEETS

The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

CONTACT

Henry Sholar

FACILITATORS

Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

FOCUS

Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

MEETS

Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Solutions

Monday, June 10 and 24, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

TOPICS
  • June 10: TBD
  • June 24: TBD
MEETS

The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, June 12, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

FOCUS

The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

TOPICS

Book for June: TBD

MEETS

The second Wednesday of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

Joyce Churchill

News and Views

Thursday, June 13 and 27, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

FOCUS

Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

MEETS

The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

MODERATOR

Rotated among a team of volunteers

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, June 25, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

FOCUS

The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

TOPICS

Book for June: The Denial of Death by Ernest Becker

MEETS

The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

CONTACT

Sheila Patterson

Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Fourth Friday OLLI-UO Meet and Greet

Friday, June 28, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Ax Billy Sports Bar and Grill, Downtown Athletic Club

“Oh those lazy, crazy, hazy days of summer!” Get together with some friends at our monthly OLLI-UO M&G at the DAC. The Sports Bar of the Downtown Athletic Club is available to us the fourth Friday of every month, between 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. Meet old friends or bring some new ones, and just enjoy! Order a beverage and a bite to eat if you wish. Last M&G someone mentioned they’ve been dreaming about the scrumptious quesadilla! Try it sometime and check out the Ax Billy Grill and Sports Bar Happy Hour Menu for this no host social.

Please stop in and visit for a while – we always have a nice, fun group of people who enjoy a strictly social OLLI-UO event! When you register with Linda Rockey, you help us and the DAC plan and staff the event. If you haven’t registered, don’t let that stop you—come anyway! Remember, making friends and building community is essential for our mental health!

May 2019 Courses and Activities

Featured In May

What Makes a Good Tax?–Oregon Humanities Conversation Project

Wednesday, May 29, 1:00–3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
Image of women in a classroom having a conversation.

People and businesses expect certain public services—education, transportation, protection, to name a few—and “tax” is the word we use to indicate how we pay for these services. But among taxpayers, what constitutes a needed public service, how much we should pay for services, and who will be taxed (and how) are areas of frequent and vehement disagreement. The conversation, led by facilitator Mary Nolan, will explore the effects—both intended and unintended—of different types of taxes and invite participants to examine and understand their own ideas and their neighbors’ ideas about the best and worst characteristics of local, state, and federal taxes.

Nolan served twelve years in the Oregon House of Representatives, building skills and relationships founded in collaboration and transparency. As Co-chair of the Committee on Ways and Means, Nolan pushed state agencies to emphasize equity, effectiveness, and long-term benefits in public services from corrections to housing, education to transportation, healthcare to environmental stewardship. She is a partner with Caudaloso, LLC, which invests in and advises socially conscious Oregon start-ups.

OLLI-UO is pleased to host this presentation by the Oregon Humanities Conversation Project. This event is free and open to the public—bring a friend!

Lectures

Global Climate Change

Monday, April 22, and Wednesdays, May 1, 8, and 15, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Impacts related to climate change are evident across the planet and in many sectors important to society–human health, agriculture, water supply, transportation, energy, ecosystems, and others–and are expected to become increasingly disruptive throughout this century and beyond. This series will cover the basics of global climate change including science behind and evidence for, effects to the environment, and international and regional response to global climate change.

APRIL 22: THE EVIDENCE

This session explores the science behind and the evidence for global climate change including review of prehistoric and modern changes in climate, role of gas house gases, and carbon and causes of global climate change.

MAY 1: THE EFFECTS

In this session, we will explore the effects to the environment, including direct and feedback causes of a predicted increase in global mean temperature of 1 to 3 degrees Celsius above 1990 levels and how it will directly affect us.

MAY 8: THE INTERNATIONAL RESPONSE

This session examines the international response to a global climate change, including UN frameworks, climate conventions, international assessment reports, 1995 Kyoto Protocol, and 2015 Paris Agreement.

MAY 15: THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND WESTERN CANADA RESPONSE

This session will consider the regional response to global change by California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, including frameworks, conventions, US and regional assessment reports, and current and proposed laws to reduce greenhouse gasses.

Presenter Gary Rayor has been a civil engineer in Eugene for 39 years and was lead engineer of the DeFazio Bridge.

Miracle Planet: The 4.6 Billion-Year History of Our Home World

Tuesdays, May 7, 14, 21, 28, and June 4, Noon–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

This five-part series will feature programs from the Discovery Channel, with a short introduction and optional discussion after the video. Learn about recent discoveries on how the world was made, how life began and was nearly wiped out by numerous catastrophes, and eventually thrived long enough to make us. These vividly gorgeous films were created by the National Film Board of Canada with NHK Japan.

The weekly programs will cover:

  • The Violent Past;
  • Snowball Earth;
  • New Frontiers for Life;
  • Extinction Events and Rebirth;
  • Survival of the Mammals and Origins of Humans

Host Barb Shaw earned an MS in physiology at Georgetown, was and still occasionally is a science writer, led the Eugene Astronomical Society for three years, and has had a continuing interest in how it all began in Big History, the long story of where we come from.

Hangin’ With Microbes

Wednesday, May 8, 12:00–1:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Anthrax, Ebola, E. Coli, Norovirus. It seems we are bombarded every day with microbiological news, but are you knowledgeable enough to lead a conversation in a social gathering? Can you even follow a conversation? Do you understand the science behind the news? If not, this lecture series is for you. It is designed for non-experts to gain a fuller understanding of everyday microbiology.

This is a make-up session and final meeting of an eight-part series led by OLLI-UO member Jim Novitsky and will focus on controlling the growth of and/or killing microbes.

Novitsky is a popular OLLI-UO speaker who holds a PhD and an MBA and is a former University lecturer.

Information Hub Training Session

Monday, May 13, 2:00-3:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

This session will provide an orientation to and explanation of the OLLI-UO Information Hub, the section of the OLLI-UO website that displays and outlines all of our courses, events, announcements, and other happenings. Eugene/Springfield Program Manager Todd Gauthier will highlight and explain the four main sections of the Hub:

Tips and advice for leveraging the Hub in order to optimize your OLLI-UO experience will be offered. After the presentation proper, a question and answer and hands-on practice session will begin. Laptops (both PC and Mac) will be available for practice navigation in real-time. Attendees are encouraged to bring their own laptops and/or mobile devices and use them during the session. This session is designed for both newcomers to the Information Hub and for anyone interested in brushing up on their navigational skills.

Oregon Wild: Protecting and Exploring Oregon’s Wildlands and Ancient Forests

Tuesday, May 14, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Oregon Wild’s mission is to protect and restore Oregon’s wildlands, waters, and wildlife as an enduring legacy. Since 1974, Oregon Wild has worked to inform and involve the public in, and to influence decision makers on, the conservation issues facing our state. Oregon Wild’s Western Oregon Field Coordinator, Chandra LeGue, will review significant accomplishments in the organization’s history--from protecting wilderness and wild and scenic rivers to going to bat for the pure waters of Waldo Lake--and current campaigns, including protecting endangered gray wolves and modernizing Oregon’s logging laws. She will discuss the ways Oregon Wild engages and educates forest, wildlands, and wildlife advocates, through public outreach, hikes, the Oregon Brewshed Alliance, and the Wild Ones advocacy training program. In addition, LeGue will discuss the ecology and importance of Oregon’s ancient forests, current threats to their continued existence, and her forthcoming book, Oregon’s Ancient Forests: A Hiking Guide, that helps outdoor lovers discover special places across the state.

LeGue holds a master’s degree in environmental studies from the University of Oregon and has worked for Oregon Wild since 2003, primarily to promote Oregon Wild’s “common sense vision” for forest management on public lands. She has been involved in wilderness protection campaigns, federal and state legislation, and many outreach events for Oregon Wild. Chandra has led over 100 public hikes, including in the proposed Devil’s Staircase Wilderness. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Middle Fork Willamette Watershed Council.

After Work: Life in the Shadows of Capital in Bangladesh

Wednesday, May 22, 2:00 - 3:30 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room

Have you ever wondered about the workers who sew the cheap clothing sold by such stores as Walmart and H & M? Come to this talk for a look at the lives of women workers in the garment factories in Bangladesh. The young women usually come from villages, are uneducated, often married but in an abusive relationship or separated, and work six 12-hour days a week for little pay and often under hazardous working conditions.

Cultural Anthropologist Lamia Karim, Associate Professor in the UO Department of Anthropology has been doing research about women workers in Bangladesh. Her research focuses on women, globalization, the development of the neoliberal state, the religious right, and social movements. She has written the much acclaimed book Microfinance and Discontent: Women in Debt in Bangladesh. She earned her PhD at Rice University.

Study and Discussion Groups

Creative Writing Critique

Monday, May 6 and 20, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or are simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO’s Creative Writing group. We are authors, columnists, essayists, poets and non-fiction and fiction writers of all genres. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to those just wanting to try their hand. Everyone is welcome.

We meet to encourage our creativity-in-common and to exchange ideas and information . . . but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other’s projects-of-choice (at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece) as well as offering and accepting constructive, objective critiquing, ideas and suggestions.

Since the written word often has a different feel than the spoken word . . . and since some of us just plain have trouble hearing . . . it would be extremely helpful if you’d bring several hard copies of what you plan to read.

FOCUS

Sharing the process of writing and publication of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and memoirs. Writers of all levels of experience and all genres are welcome.

MEETS

The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

Livvie Taylor-Young

OLLI-UO Film Series: Lots of Laughs: Great Hollywood Comedies Through the Years

Mondays, January 7–June 3 2:00-4:00 p.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
JANUARY 7: BRINGING UP BABY, 1938, INTRODUCED BY CRAIG STARR

A classic romantic comedy of errors occurs when Cary Grant’s reserved, quiet paleontologist keeps crossing paths with Katherine Hepburn’s zany, flighty, and often irritating heiress. Things come to a head when Hepburn’s pet leopard, Baby, escapes and she ropes Grant into helping with the chase. Cast: Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Charles Ruggles

JANUARY 21: NO FILM

UO and OLLI-UO closed in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

FEBRUARY 4: ANNIE HALL, 1977, INTRODUCED BY SUSAN WALCOTT

A twice-divorced, neurotic, and intellectual Jewish stand-up comic in New York reflects on his on-again, off-again relationship with a ditzy, insecure, Midwest WASP who wants to be a nightclub singer. This is a funny and often endearing reflection on romance, relationships, and pop culture. Cast: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Carol Kane, Paul Simon, Shelley Duvall

FEBRUARY 18: A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, 1935, INTRODUCED BY JOHN ATTIG

Classic comic chaos and tomfoolery ensue when a sly business manager and his two wacky friends try to help two opera singers achieve success while humiliating their stuffy, snobbish adversaries. Cast: Groucho Marx, Chico Marx, Harpo Marx, Kitty Carlisle, Allan Jones

MARCH 4: MY FAVORITE YEAR, 1982, INTRODUCED BY HOWARD SCHUMAN

A junior writer on a mid-50’s top-rated variety/comedy show is assigned to baby-sit that week’s guest star – a dissolute, past-his-prime swashbuckling movie actor with a drinking habit – and ensure that he appears for the show. Cast: Peter O’Toole, Mark Linn-Baker, Jessica Harper, Joseph Bologna, Lainie Kazan

MARCH 18: THE 100-YEAR OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED, 2013, INTRODUCED BY ANDY WALCOTT

After a long and colorful life, a man escapes on his 100th birthday from the nursing home where he has been stuck, and begins an unexpected, humorous, and heart-warming journey. Cast: Robert Gustafsson, Iwar Waklander, David Wiberg

APRIL 1: THE MOUSE THAT ROARED, 1959, INTRODUCED BY CRAIG STARR

In this zany satire, the world’s smallest country–the impoverished Duchy of Grand Fenwick–is in an economic crisis and so declares war on the United States with the intention of surrendering after one day in the hope that the U.S. will provide vast financial aid to rebuild the country. Cast: Peter Sellers, Jean Seberg, William Hartnell, Leo McKern

APRIL 15: BEING THERE, 1979, INTRODUCED BY SUSAN WALCOTT

A biting and darkly satiric look at politics and the rich and powerful. A simple-minded, illiterate gardener with little knowledge of the world has a chance encounter with a businessman and his wife, who take his simple homilies for deep insight and wisdom, thereby becoming the businessman’s confidante and advisor and a political insider. Cast: Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Melvyn Douglas, Jack Warden, Richard Dysart, Richard Basehart

MAY 6: THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT, 1951, INTRODUCED BY JOHN ATTIG

A humble and altruistic chemist develops a fabric which never gets dirty or wears out, to the dismay and horror of the fabric industry, both owners and labor, who try to suppress his discovery. Cast: Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood, Cecil Parker

MAY 20: WOMAN OF THE YEAR, 1942, INTRODUCED BY HOWARD SCHUMAN

The relationship between rival reporters who are married to each other and work on the same newspaper becomes strained when she is elected “woman of the year” in recognition of her feminist activities and advocacy. Cast: Katherine Hepburn, Spencer Tracy, Fay Bainter, Willilam Bendix

JUNE 3: BEST IN SHOW, 2000, INTRODUCED BY ANDY WALCOTT

A film crew follows around the quirky owners and handlers of five show dogs as they prepare for and arrive at the Mayflower Kennel Club Dog Show. The dog show brings out their all-too-human foibles as we all wait to see who will be Best in Show. Cast: Fred Willard, Eugene Levy, Catherine O’Hara, Bob Balaban

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon-1:00 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

The meditation/mindfulness group meets for one hour once a week. The first half hour is spent listening to a talk given by a meditation teacher from the Internet. The next half hour is spent in silent meditation. There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group; some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this class, some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha.)

FOCUS

This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana or breath or insight meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

MEETS

Every Monday from noon-1:00 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Janice Friend

Beginning Spanish

Mondays, 12:15–1:45 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Beginning Spanish is open to all, whether you know nothing beyond “hola” for “hello” or if you’re quite good at Spanish, but the time slot suits you. We speak in Spanish as much as possible. We use kids’ books to practice reading. Come and check it out.

FOCUS

Beginning level Spanish course; no basic knowledge required

MEETS

Every Monday from 12:15–1:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR/TEACHER

Sara Michener

French Language

Mondays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

In the first half-hour we have a session of grammar targeting an intermediate level of French. In the second half-hour we have a conversation class with intermediate levels and advanced levels together and in the third half hour we target an advanced level of French where we read an article or discuss ideas or topics of interest to French language and culture.

FOCUS

Learning and improving our French through grammar, conversations, readings and discussions.

MEETS

Every Monday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Elaine De Martin-Webster and Thomas Walker

Understanding Science

Tuesday, May 7 and 21, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Understanding Science began a new topic this past fall, continuing into the winter and spring, called Redefining Reality: The Intellectual Implications of Modern Science. Class discussions are based on The Great Courses series by Professor Steven Gimbel (c)2015 who brings a lifetime of insight to this historical survey of our models of reality seen through the disciplines of the physical, biological, social sciences and technology. His holistic approach often brings fun examples of how the paths of science and math frequently run parallel to what was being explored in the graphic arts, literature, entertainment, and architecture of the times. How has our understanding of what the universe is and is not changed over time? And what definitions of “reality” help us best comprehend the universe around and within us. Re-experience the Enlightenment. Because Gimbel does not demean previous views of reality, he acts as an advocate for how these ideas could have been held by reasonable people. This course has the potential to help us understand how others experience a different reality—even today.

FOCUS

To present outstanding introductory college-level DVD science courses, and to enjoy the opportunity to share and discuss related ideas and information among group members. No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of the course. Decisions concerning specific course subjects are made by a majority vote of the group. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

TOPICS
  • May 7: Genetic Engineering; Medically Enhanced Humans
  • April 21: Transhumans: Making Living Gods; Artificial Intelligence
MEETS

The first, third and fifth (if applicable) Tuesdays of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

International Relations

Wednesday, May 1 and 15, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Alaska-Mexico Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members learn through presentations and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world. The facilitator maintains an email list for distribution of presenters’ materials, links to websites, videos and readings prior to the sessions.

FOCUS

International affairs, history, current global developments and U.S. foreign policy.

TOPICS
May 1: “Engaging with Iran in the Era of Trump”

Paul Barker has returned once again from Iran.  His presentation will include pictures, stories and insights from travels, coupled with updates on the status of the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) and the dangers of the Trump/Bolton/Pompeo approach to relations with Iran. In the 1970s, Paul and Nora Barker served as Peace Corps volunteers in Iran.  They have spent over three and a half decades doing international relief and development work in the Near East and East Africa.

May 15: “Migration: What Is All the Fuss About?

Governments are struggling with the largest mass migrations in history and political systems around the world are experiencing a tectonic shift as a result. Presenter Alan Van Egmond guides us through this pressing global phenomenon. For 37 years, Egmond served as a career member of the SFS, the U.S. Senior Foreign Service. SFS members are the senior leaders and experts for the management of the Foreign Service and its functions. They are appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate.

MEETS

The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATORS

Bill Taliaferro and Randall Donohue

Interpretive Play Reading

Wednesday, May 1 and 15, 3:30–5:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the “director” and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

FOCUS

The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play’s merits, information about its author, or other related matters.

MEETS

The first and third Wednesdays of each month from 3:30–5:30 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Jack Bennett and Iona Waller

Poetry on Wheels

Thursday, May 2 and 16, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Patagonia Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Members share poems they have written, provide each other with supportive feedback, and delve into their own creative process in a like-minded group. All voices and levels of experience welcomed. Come as you are. Prompts are provided if wanted. Opportunities for reading in front of an audience discussed.

FOCUS

Writing and speaking your inspiration and craft.

MEETS

The first, third, and fifth (if applicable) Thursdays of each month at 9:30–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

group facilitated

Thinking Allowed

Thursday, May 2 and 16, 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Thinking Allowed is a participatory round table discussion group where all can contribute their knowledge and opinions toward making broad, complex issues more understandable to everyone. The subject areas are selected by the participants, with a write up about the specific topic for each session emailed a few days in advance to permit personal thought and investigation. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

An informal discussion group devoted to the exchange of views on contemporary social issues and problems confronting the nation, state and local community.

TOPICS
  • May 2: “The History of Israel” with guest presenter Avi Naiman
  • May 16: TBD
MEETS

The first and third Thursdays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches.

CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Short Story Discussions

Thursday, May 2 and 16, 1:30–3:00 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Short story anthologies are generally used as a source of each term’s readings; additional selections may be provided by the facilitator.

FOCUS

Reading a variety of short stories and discussing them as a group.

TOPICS
  • May 2: “The Bridge by Daniel Alarcon (handout)
  • May 16: “Red-Headed Baby” by Langston Hughes and “The Man Who Was Almost a Man” by Richard Wright

All selections, unless otherwise indicated, are from The Oxford Book of American Short Stories, 2nd edition, edited by Joyce Carol Oates. Stories marked “handout” will be made available at the CPE office in Room 110.

MEETS

The first and third Thursdays of each month from 1:30–3:00 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Shiela Pardee and Anne Pacheco

Drop-in Meditation Time

Thursdays, 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Belize Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A shared period of silence with a bit of social connection and sharing on both sides. There is no right or wrong way to do it.

FOCUS

Becoming comfortable with resting in the presence of others with awareness and acceptance.

MEETS

Every Thursday from 11:45 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

Note: period of shared silence between 12:10 and 12:50 p.m.

FACILITATORS

Shared

Contact

Jean Novitsky

Culture Italiane

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Alaska Room
ABOUT THIS COURSE

Culture Italiane (“Italian cultures”) explores the diverse geography, economies, history, cultures and products of Italy’s 20 regions. English-language videos and the Geografia d’Italia per Stranieri textbook are used to learn about each region.

Knowledge of Italian is not necessary for participating in the study group, which is conducted in English. Textbook passages are translated to English to make them accessible to everyone. For those interested in Italian, the course is also an opportunity to share or improve their Italian language knowledge.

FOCUS

Understanding the cultural diversity of Italy’s regions

TOPICS
  • May 2: History, culture and art of Siena
  • May 9: Food in Tuscany
  • May 16: Niccolò Machiavelli and The Prince
  • May 23: Lucca, Giacomo Puccini and La bohème
  • May 30: San Gimignano and Elba
MEETS

Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Lee Altschuler

Philosophy Salon

Monday, May 13, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room; no meeting May 27
FOCUS

A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member, or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

TOPICS
  • May 13: Heidegger's “Being and Time" and "Existentialism and the Frankfort School"
  • May 27: no meeting; OLLI-UO closed due to Memorial Day holiday
MEETS

The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

CONTACT

Henry Sholar

FACILITATORS

Byron Chell, Dennis Lawrence, and Lorraine Ironplow

Spanish Conversation

Thursdays, 3:15–4:45 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Someone volunteers to facilitate the meeting, and everyone contributes readings or topics for conversation in Español. Some of us speak Español rather well and want to practice it weekly. Others are very rusty but get more fluent as they keep trying.

FOCUS

Speaking Spanish informally. Basic knowledge.

MEETS

Every Thursday from 3:15–4:45 p.m.

FACILITATOR

Stan Cook and Carolin Keutzer

Solutions

Monday, May 13, 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m. Canada Room; no meeting May 27
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic. Attendees are welcome to bring their lunches. Visit the website with past and current subject handouts and schedules.

FOCUS

Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

TOPICS
  • May 13: TBD
  • May 27: no meeting; OLLI-UO closed due to Memorial Day holiday
MEETS

The second and fourth Mondays of each month from 11:45 a.m.–1:45 p.m.

CONTACT

Jerry Brule

Historical Novels and Nonfiction

Wednesday, May 8, 10:00–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you would like to brush up on history and enjoy a good story along the way, join us twice a month for some very lively discussions of the books by a group of thoughtful and insightful men and women. Expect diverse opinions—we'll welcome your insights too!

Titles are selected by group vote every six months and each book (or author) is discussed over two meetings.

FOCUS

The reading and discussion of historical novels and nonfiction.

TOPICS

Book for May: A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline (fiction)

MEETS

The second Wednesday of each month from 10:00–11:30 a.m.

FACILITATOR

Joyce Churchill

News and Views

Thursday, May 9 and 23, 9:30–11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

FOCUS

Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news.

MEETS

The second and fourth Thursdays of each month from 9:30–11:30 a.m.

MODERATOR

Rotated among a team of volunteers

Classics/Philosophy

Tuesday, May 28, 1:30–3:30 p.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

This group meets once a month for approximately two hours to discuss the book selection of the month. We also briefly review the author’s biography and how he or she came to author the book. We alternate between classic fiction (fifty years old or older) and classic non-fiction (also at least fifty years old). Many of the non-fiction selections have philosophical themes. We choose books for the coming year in May and June.

FOCUS

The reading and discussion of classic novels and works of philosophy, political theory, religion or sociology.

TOPICS

Book for May: Ward No. 6 and Other Stories by Anton Chekov

MEETS

The fourth Tuesday of each month at 1:30–3:30 p.m.

CONTACT

Sheila Patterson

Fifth Thursdays/Sharing Personal Experiences

Thursday, May 30, 10:00-11:30 a.m. Canada Room
ABOUT THIS GROUP

Once a year, group members suggest topics they would like to discuss with each other. These topics are voted on by the entire group. Those with the most votes begin the new year and continue on until completed. Examples of topics: How travel experiences changed your life?, Growing up in America, what changes have you experienced in how society views male/female roles?; What teacher/mentor had the greatest impact on your life and how?; Are you an extrovert or an introvert and how has that impacted your life both positively and negatively?; As a youth, what were your thoughts about growing old and how do they compare with what you’ve experienced so far?

FOCUS

Sharing our personal life experiences through open discussion.

  • Topic for May: What was one of your biggest challenges in life, and how did you overcome it?
MEETS

Fifth Thursdays of the month (usually 5 per year) from 10:00-11:30 a.m.

FACILITATORS

Skip Berlin and Antonia Lewis

 Tours, Field Trips, and Special Events

Fourth Friday OLLI-UO Meet and Greet

Friday, May 24, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Ax Billy Sports Bar and Grill, Downtown Athletic Club

Bad weather is no longer an excuse! Get together with other “OLLIes” at our monthly OLLI -UO M&G at the DAC. Meet old friends, or bring some new ones, and just enjoy! Order a beverage and a bite to eat if you wish, and visit a while. Check out the Ax Billy Sports Bar and Grill Happy Hour Menu for this no host social. No purchase is required.

Please stop in and visit for a while – we always have a nice, fun group of people who enjoy a strictly social OLLI-UO event!


Archive

An archive of previous courses and activities is available.

2018 courses and activities archive

2019 courses and activities archive

 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon