University of Oregon

OLLI-UO Program Catalog

All offerings take place via Zoom, with hybrid (in-person and Zoom) class delivery available for select offerings. See specific listings for location detail. All lectures, courses, groups, and events are open to all members at all program sites, unless otherwise indicated. For help using Zoom, refer to Participating in Zoom programs.

Lectures

Offered as series or stand-alone sessions, these dynamic presentations are typically taught by university faculty, community experts, and OLLI-UO members. The lecture format consists of a presentation followed by lively discussion. Zoom links are emailed to all members the day before the start date, unless otherwise indicated. Follow the links in the titles below to view full descriptions and information.

Oregon Mozart Players: Sound Investment—Exploring the World of Music Composition Through the Lens of a Composer

Wednesday, August 3, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom. Presenter is at the Baker Downtown Center.

DESCRIPTION

This unique program offers an inside scoop into the creation of new music at Oregon Mozart Players (OMP). OMP’s inaugural year was the previous season, which included work with composer Juhi Bansal. It provided an opportunity for participants to meet the composer and engage with her through all stages of the composition process, watch her working with the orchestra members, and see the music through the various stages of a composition "coming to life" and ending with concert night. The 2022-23 season will feature composer Molly Joyce. 

About ThE presenter

Presenter Daren Fuster is executive director of the Oregon Mozart Players. His education includes degrees from Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester, and the Conservatory of Music at University of Cincinnati in viola performance and literature. Daren has been a performer with numerous organizations, including the Grand Teton Music Festival, the Heidelberg Festival in Germany, Redlands (CA) Symphony, Sinfonia Gulf Coast (FL), and the Eugene Symphony.

Design and Construction of Eugene-Springfield’s Iconic Pedestrian Bridges: Peter DeFazio Bridge

Tuesday, August 9, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom. Presenter is at the Baker Downtown Center.

DESCRIPTION

The Eugene-Springfield area has the distinction of having three innovative, award-winning pedestrian bridges (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge). Gary Rayor, the Engineer of Record (EoR) for all three projects, will discuss the design and construction of two of them in August presentations at OLLI-UO. (Ed. Note: he will return to OLLI-UO at a later date to cover the Delta Ponds Bridge). Rayor will also lead corresponding field trips to view and further discuss these iconic bridges.

In his first presentation, Rayor will cover the design and construction of the Peter DeFazio Bridge, connecting the Ruth Bascom Bike Path along the south bank of the Willamette River with the north bank paths in Alton Baker Park. The bridge was constructed in 1998, has a main span of 338 feet, and has won three national awards for design excellence. It consists of a unique innovative suspension bridge system that has recently gained use in other similar bridges in the US, UK, and Europe.

A follow-up field trip to the Peter DeFazio Bridge, also led by Rayor, will be held on Friday, August 12.

About ThE presenter

Presenter Gary Rayor, PE/SE (Professional Engineer/Structural Engineer), was EoR for all three (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge) of these unique long-span, cable-supported bridges. Rayor received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado in 1974 and is still practicing engineering part-time. He is currently licensed as a PE/SE in five US states.

Design and Construction of Eugene-Springfield’s Iconic Pedestrian Bridges: Gateway/I-5 Bridge

Tuesday, August 16, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom. Presenter is at the Baker Downtown Center.

DESCRIPTION

The Eugene-Springfield area has the distinction of having three innovative, award-winning pedestrian bridges (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge). Gary Rayor, the Engineer of Record (EoR) for all three projects, will discuss the design and construction of two of them in August presentations at OLLI-UO. (Ed. Note: he will return to OLLI-UO at a later date to cover the Delta Ponds Bridge). Rayor will also lead corresponding field trips to view and further discuss these iconic bridges.

In this second presentation, Rayor will cover the design and construction of the Gateway/I-5 Bridge, spanning I-5 to connect Eugene and Springfield near The Shoppes at Gateway mall. The bridge was constructed in 2011, has main spans of 105 feet, and has won two national awards for design excellence. It consists of a unique cable-stayed system that was also used in the Delta Ponds Bridge and other bridges in the US.

A follow-up field trip to the Gateway/I-5 Bridge, also led by Rayor, will be held on Friday, August 19.

About ThE presenter

Presenter Gary Rayor, PE/SE (Professional Engineer/Structural Engineer), was EoR for all three (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge) of these unique long-span, cable-supported bridges. Rayor received his Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado in 1974 and is still practicing engineering part-time. He is currently licensed as a PE/SE in five US states.

FREE: Two Years, Six Lives, and the Long Journey Home

Wednesday, August 31, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom. Presenter is at the Baker Downtown Center.

DESCRIPTION

What now? certainly must be the quandary facing persons re-entering communities after incarceration in prisons. Presenter Lauren Kessler will discuss her newly published book, FREE: Two Years, Six Lives, and the Long Journey Home and the work she has done on prison education and making the transition from prison. This is a follow-up, sibling lecture to the presentation last fall at OLLI-UO given by UO staff and former students of the UO Prison Education Program.  

About ThE presenter

Kessler is a narrative nonfiction writer who specializes in exploring invisible subcultures in our midst. The author of fifteen books, she has written about everything from the gritty world of a maximum-security prison to the grueling world of ballet to the world of those living with (and caring for those with) Alzheimer's disease. She ran a writing group for lifers inside a maximum-security penitentiary and has volunteered as a mentor at a prison re-entry services nonprofit. Founder and director of a graduate program in literary journalism at the University of Oregon, she currently teaches storytelling for social change at the University of Washington and writing workshops for the Vienna-based Forum for Journalism and Media. Learn more about Kessler’s bibliography and view her blog on her website.

Banning Books Is on the Rise: The Why, How, and What of Censorship

Tuesday, September 13, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Location

Baker Downtown Center, Elks Lodge, and Zoom. Presenter is at Elks Lodge

Description

“Banning books give us silence when we need speech. It closes our ears when we need to listen. It makes us blind when we need sight.”  Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Books can be illuminating, exalting, and beautiful. They can also be disturbing and challenging. What do you do with books that disturb or unnerve you? Youth books are increasingly the targets of censorship in our hyperpolarized environment. Join OLLI-UO member Heather McNeil, former youth services librarian, for a fascinating look at the history of censored books, the current politics that affect censorship, and why people believe that some books should be removed from schools and library shelves. What can you do to promote #fREADom?

Note: The Central Oregon Program Committee scheduled this lecture ahead of the 2022 celebration of Banned Books Week, taking place September 18–24.

About the Presenter

Heather McNeil was a youth services librarian and manager for forty years, including 20 years with the Deschutes Public Library. She served as the Intellectual Freedom Committee Chair for the Colorado and Oregon Library Associations, as well as for the Mountain Plains Library Association. The Oregon Library Association named her the 1999 Intellectual Freedom Champion. Heather is a professional storyteller and the author of four books about storytelling, early literacy, and story time skills.

Courses

Courses cover topics in-depth from four to twelve weeks and may require additional reading or preparation. Registration may be required. Zoom links are emailed to all members the day before the start date, unless otherwise indicated. Follow the links in the titles below to view full descriptions and information.

Understanding Science

First, Third, and Fifth Tuesdays, noon–2:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Understanding Science presents outstanding introductory college-level prerecorded science lectures on a common theme or topic. After a lecture, the group discusses it, offers related ideas, and shares information.

No specialized knowledge is required to appreciate these excellent lectures. The lectures are only mildly cumulative in nature, and if you are occasionally unable to attend, this fact should not impede your enjoyment of a single lecture. Emphasis is placed on the natural and the formal sciences, but consideration is also given to a broader perspective that includes the philosophy of science, and the social, behavioral, and applied sciences.

Discussion and supplemental materials for these sessions are supplied by member-facilitators, augmented by lessons from the Great Courses professor.

TOPICS

The Theory of Everything: The Quest to Explain All Reality

June 7: Two Prototype Theories of Everything; The Union of Electricity and Magnetism

June 21: Particles and Waves: The Quantum World; Einstein Unifies Space, Time, and Light

July 5: No meeting

July 19: Relativistic Quantum Fields and Feynman; Neutrinos Violating Parity and the Weak Force

August 2: Flavor Changes Via the Weak Force; Electroweak Unification Via the Higgs Field

August 16: Quarks, Color, and the Strong Force; Standard Model Triumphs and Challenges

August 30: How Neutrino Identity Oscillates; Conversation Laws and Symmetry: Emmy Noether

COURSE MANAGERS

Barbara Nagai and Elizabeth Polidan

America and the World: A Diplomatic History

First and Third Wednesdays, May 4–December 7, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

No meeting May 18, July 6, and September 7

NOTE: This course is presented as part of the International Relations study and discussion group.

LOcation

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

Description

Through Fall 2022, International Relations will present The Great Courses series America and the World: A Diplomatic History.

The course will construct a diplomatic history of the United States over more than two hundred years, charting the path from independence from Great Britain to becoming a global superpower.

How could such an implausible metamorphosis have occurred? In a world where power and the willingness to wield it had always determined the fate of nations, what factors enabled our young nation to successfully navigate the corridors of diplomacy and foreign policy from the outset, ensuring not only survival but also eventual status as a superpower? The course will explore these questions and more.

Participants will view two lectures per session, followed by a facilitated discussion period.

About ThE presenter

Professor Mark A. Stoler is a Professor Emeritus of History at The University of Vermont, where he specialized from 1970 to 2007 in U.S. diplomatic and military history. He received his B.A. from the City College of New York and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

Topics

May 4: Achieving Independence; Confederation and the Constitution

May 18: No meeting

June 1: The Great Debate: Jefferson vs. Hamilton; From the Farewell Address to the Quasi War

June 15: Jefferson and the “Empire of Liberty”; The “Second War for Independence”

July 6: No meeting

July 20: John Quincy Adams & American Continentalism; “Manifest Destiny” and War with Mexico

August 3: Causes and Diplomacy of the Civil War; The “New Empire” of Overseas Imperialism

August 17: Informal Empire: Roosevelt to Wilson; “The War to End All Wars”

September 7: No meeting

September 21: The Peace Treaty and Wilson’s Heritage; Interwar Isolationism and Internationalism

October 5: U.S. Entry into World War II; World War II Diplomacy and the FDR Legacy

October 19: Origins of the Cold War; Cold War Turns Hot: Asia and the Korean War

November 2: Eisenhower and the Global Cold War; Kennedy and the Ultimate Cold War Crisis

November 16: Vietnam and the War at Home; The Nixon-Kissinger “Grand Design”

December 7: Ideology Anew and the End of the Cold War; The United States and the World Since 1991

Facilitators

Stephen Koller, Deb Sorensen, and Margot Zallen

The Mongol Empire Strikes Back

Thursdays, September 15–December 8, 10:00 a.m.–noon

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center, Elks Lodge, and Zoom

DESCRIPTION

Why learn about Mongol history? Their interest in technology and global learning led to developments in science, printing, astronomy, medicine, statecraft, and animal domestication, along with the creation and consolidation of an empire second only to Rome’s. Contemporary China seeks to emulate their example—what does Xi Jinping know about Genghis that we should also learn?

To kick off the 2022–2023 academic year, we take a deep dive into this recent Great Courses series (2020) exploring the Mongol Empire. From Eastern Europe in the west to China and Korea in the east, the Mongols controlled almost one-sixth of the world’s land mass. In fact, during the 13th and 14th centuries, the Mongol Empire was the largest contiguous empire in the history of the world. All of this began from the arid steppe lands of current Mongolia with the first great Mongol leader, Chinggis Khan. These episode steach us about Chinggis and the Khans that followed him in the conquest of this vast and influential empire. We learn about the foundations of the modern Eurasian landmass that still influences this area today.

about the presenter

Dr. Craig Benjamin of Valley State University (Michigan) has a PhD from Macquarie University in Australia and has received various teaching and research awards. He has written nine books and many academic articles. He is also past president of the World History Association.

TOPICS

September 15: The Mongols’ Place in World History; The Origins of Eurasian Steppe Nomadism

September 22: Nomadic Predecessors of the Mongols; The Rise of Chinggis Khan

September 29: Chinggis Khan’s Early Conquest; Mongol Institutions Under Chinggis Khan

October 6: Chinggis Khan’s Khwarazmian Conquests; The Death of Chinggis Khan

October 13: Ogedai Khan’s Western Campaigns; Mongol Queens and the Contest for the Empire

October 20: Dividing the Empire: A Tale of Four Brothers; The Strengths of Mongol Military Organizations

October 27: The Mongols in China; The Mongols in East and Southeast Asia

November 3: The Mongols in Central Asia; The Mongols in Persia and the Middle East

November 10: The Mongols in Russia: The Golden Horde; The Pax Mongolica: Eurasia Reconnected

November 17: The Collapse of the Mongolian Empires; Timur the Lame, a.k.a. Tamerlane

November 24: NO CLASS (Thanksgiving holiday)

December 1: Timur’s Major Campaigns; Samarkand: Timur’s Cultural Capitol

December 8: From Mughals to Soviets: Eurasia After Timur; The Mongols and the Making of the Modern World

COURSE MANAGERS

Maggi Machala and Susan Walcott

Study and Discussion Groups

Study and discussion groups are designed as an informal exchange of ideas in a considerate atmosphere. Group topics are well-defined and explored in-depth. Zoom links are emailed to all members the day before the start date, unless otherwise indicated. Follow the links in the titles below to view full descriptions and information.

Writers' Bloc

Mondays, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Please note: this group is on hiatus for the summer. Email osher@uoregon.edu if interested in participating starting Fall 2022.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A casual gathering for writers at all levels to share in a supportive environment. Creative experimentation with styles and genres encouraged.

FACILITATOR

Bruce Sharp

Meditation and Mindfulness

Mondays, noon–1:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

This group utilizes what is known as Vipassana (or breath or insight) meditation, focusing on the sensation of breathing. Insight meditation utilizes the five senses to get us to awareness and being present.

The first 10 or 15 minutes of class is spent in a guided grounding meditation. The next 15-20 minutes of class are spent listening to an Internet mindfulness/meditation teacher on a variety of subjects. The last 20 minutes are spent in silent meditation.

There are many different levels of meditation being practiced by the group: some are beginners, some are returning to the practice through this group, and some are advanced meditators who are here to experience the benefits of group meditation and a sense of community (sangha).

FACILITATOR

Janice Friend

Intermediate French Conversation

Mondays, 2:30–3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Intermediate French Conversation is for those whose listening and speaking skills are a bit rusty. It is not for true beginners. In our 60-minute meetings, we spend the first half of the session encouraging participants to use the French they know to converse with each other about things of interest in their daily lives. We give each other constructive feedback in regards to vocabulary, pronunciation, and grammar and help each other when we get stuck. In the second half of the session, if there is time, we read and discuss short texts and listen to native French speakers online, checking to make sure that everyone understands.

FACILITATOR

Thomas Walker

Advanced French Conversation

Mondays, 3:30–4:45 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Advanced French Conversation is for those who speak French fluently. The 75-minute sessions have no set format, but generally give all participants ample opportunity to speak. One person may do a “show and tell.” At other times, we have lively discussions of current events or share information about cultural events. Participants are fluent enough to keep up with the conversations. Time permitting, we may read and listen to native speakers using online resources such as “News in Slow French” so that we can practice listening to authentic French spoken at normal speed by native speakers.

FACILITATOR

Thomas Walker

Philosophy Salon

First and Third Mondays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

Note: Philosophy Salon is on hiatus, returning later in 2022.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

A peer-led exploration of philosophers and philosophy. Each session features either a presentation by a group member or a recorded lecture, followed by discussion.

FACILITATOR

Group facilitated

Nonfiction Book Group

First and Third Mondays, 10:15 a.m.–noon

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The nonfiction book group meets twice per month to discuss a nonfiction book that the group has selected. The books range from political history to the history of science, to biography, exploration, and natural history. We learn a lot about different topics and have a great conversation.

Please note: this discussion group takes a break for the summer and will resume its twice-monthly sessions in fall 2022, with the first meeting the end of August.

TOPICS

August 29 and September 19: How the South Won the Civil War by Heather Cox Richardson, facilitated by Don Elting

October 3 and 17: Factfulness by Hans Rosling with Ola Rosling and Anna Rosling Ronnlund, facilitated by Tom Carroll

November 7 and 21: Lessons from the Edge by Marie Yovanovitch, facilitated by Marita Kunkel

November 28 and December 12: American Kleptocracy by Casey Michel, facilitator needed

LEAD FACILITATOR

Wendy Chase

Page Turners Fiction Book Group

Second Mondays, 10:15 a.m.–noon

Registration is closed.

Registration is required for each academic quarter. Summer runs July–September; Fall is October–December.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

We are a lively and very welcoming group of fiction lovers who choose a novel to read and critique as a group every month. Over the course of the year, each member selects and facilitates the spirited discussion of a contemporary or classic novel of less than 400 pages. We have a great time!

TOPICS

Monday, July 11: So Long, See You Tomorrow by William Maxwell, facilitated by Katherine Kahr

Monday, August 8: Martin Marten by Brian Doyle, facilitated by Heather McNeil

Monday, September 12: The Netanyahus by Joshua Cohen, facilitated by Rich Romm

Monday, October 10: Gilead by Marilynne Robinson, facilitated by Deb Hollens

Monday, November 14: The Color of Lightning M. by Paulette Jiles, facilitated by Judy Hurlburt

LEAD FACILITATOR

Deb Hollens

International Relations

First and Third Wednesdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

DESCRIPTION

This group focuses on international affairs, history, current global developments, and U.S. foreign policy. Participants learn through recorded lectures, live presentations, and discussions on topics connected with geo-politics, international business, global cultures, trade, the environment, and America’s place in the world.

TOPICS

Through Fall 2022, International Relations will present The Great Courses series America and the World: A Diplomatic History.

LEAD FACILITATORS

Stephen Koller, Deb Sorensen, and Margot Zallen

Interpretive Play Reading

First and Third Wednesdays, 3:30–5:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

The interpretive reading of plays, usually accompanied by some discussion of a play’s merits, information about its author, or other related matters. Members of the group take turns selecting plays to be read. The person making the selection becomes the "director" and casts it from members present. Character changes are made as necessary to make sure that all present get a chance to read.

FACILITATORS

Donna Bennett, Jack Bennett, and Kate Nelson

Spanish Conversation II

Thursdays, 3:15–4:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

This group is fun for those who have had several years of Spanish classes and can read and converse fairly comfortably. At present we like to read and discuss novels, as well as discuss current events and share information about anything that appeals to us. Among our members are a couple of kind, patient native speakers. The rest of us commit our share of grammatical errors, and nobody is expected to be perfect. There is no teacher, no rules are engraved in stone, and we make our decisions democratically. Please visit our meetings and see if what we offer suits your needs. We are always eager and delighted to welcome new members.

FACILITATORS

Facilitators rotate on a weekly basis. The group's contact person is Dorothy Velasco.

Solutions

First, Third, and Fifth Thursdays, 9:30–11:00 a.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Focusing on some of the most critical problems in the world, this group takes the next step through study and discussion to identify and propose possible solutions to the problems.

Generally, each session begins with 15–20 minutes of Internet videos introducing the topic while generating questions and talking points for discussion. The topic for each session is emailed a few days in advance of that meeting so participants can familiarize themselves with the topic.

TOPICS

June 30: Democracy and Corruption in our government

July 7: No meeting

July 21: Immigration reform

August 4: Education

August 18: Taxes and inequality

August 18: Guns, mass murder, and domestic terrorism

Facilitator

Jerry Brule

Bell' Italia e Italiano

First and Third Thursdays, noon–1:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you are fascinated by all things Italian and would like to learn more about the language and culture of this bel paese, this is the right study group for you. We will explore the foods, culture, and customs of Italy's twenty regions while studying the rudiments of the Italian language in a casual, supportive environment.

The current course of study for Bell’ Italia e Italiano features a new textbook, Easy Italian Reader (McGraw-Hill, 2nd or 3rd Edition). In addition, we will listen to Coffee Break Italian as we enrich our understanding of the language.

We will further explore each region with discussions and supplemental videos featuring food, art, architecture and other aspects of the culture. Facilitators are not experts, but rather volunteers who wish to share their love and knowledge of the language and country.

Although previous experience speaking Italian is not necessary, it might be helpful to have some background in speaking or reading a Romance language such as French or Spanish.

FACILITATORS

Janice D'Emidio, Kathryn Hutchinson, Judy Johnston, Larry Kikuta, Demetri Liontos, Ellie Miller, Jorry Rolfe, and Mike Sully

News and Views

Second and Fourth Thursdays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Learning through a lively exchange of views on recent local, national, and world news. A team of volunteers suggest about dozen recent news stories for discussion, in the areas of international, domestic and local. The group and moderators work together to determine what will be discussed. Participants are diverse in their experiences and interests, and they read and watch a wide range of news sources. No additional preparation is necessary. It's OK to disagree with the views of the other participants—but not to be disagreeable.

Facilitators

Roger Galka and Stephen Koller

Discussing Science

Second Thursdays, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center, The Alexander, and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Discussing Science is a monthly class that invites any member who wishes to introduce a science topic for discussion. If you have knowledge of the topic, feel free to share that if not you can introduce it to other members and invite their thoughts. The ongoing focus of this class is to discuss a variety of science topics. The idea is to have several members bring articles from online sources, periodicals, or books. Videos are also a good source of information and often make it easier to introduce the topic. If you see something online you wish to share, please send a link to our group facilitator Russ Hopper. Russ's contact information may be accessed in the Central Oregon member directory behind the OLLI-UO member portal. He will gather them so that I can show them for have a staff member do so. This discussion group only works with member participation.

LEAD FACILITATOR

Russ Hopper

Open Forum

First and Third Fridays, 9:30–11:30 a.m.

NOTE: Open Forum will meet from 2:00-4:00 p.m. on the following third Fridays: May 20, June 17, July 15, and August 19

LOCATION

Baker Downtown Center and Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

Open Forum discusses issues of group interest which range from international and national to state and local issues. Attendees are free to raise issues and topics in which they are interested. Discussions are free-flowing and open and provide participants with a positive way to share information, analysis, and opinions with each other. At the beginning of each session, the group focuses on some good, uplifting, and positive news.

FACILITATOR

Margot Zallen

Creative Writing Critique

Second and Fourth Fridays,10:00 a.m.–noon

LOCATION

Zoom

ABOUT THIS GROUP

If you love to write, are a would-be author, or simply seeking a new outlet for your creativity, you are cordially invited to join OLLI-UO's Creative Writing group. We are columnists, essayists, poets, writers of memoirs, and authors of all genres of fiction and non-fiction. Our levels of experience range from those with multiple publication credits to anyone just wanting to try his/her hand.

We meet to encourage creativity-in-common and exchange ideas and information, but our main focus is the sharing of our work. This includes both reading our own and listening to other’s projects-of-choice at any stage from rough draft to completed masterpiece... and offering and accepting ideas, suggestions and gentle, objective, constructive critiques. Everyone is welcome.

FACILITATOR

Livvie Taylor-Young

SUMMER DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES

Miss hanging with your OLLI friends? Love a good movie? Want a unique viewing experience? If so, attend this summer’s exceptional documentary series, being held at the fabulous Tin Pan Theater in downtown Bend, Oregon. In this series, we take a deep dive at an aspect of art, science, current events, and adventure. Each session includes supplemental information and a facilitated discussion after viewing the film. There is an $8 fee per person per documentary. Payment and registration are required for each film.

Concessions (including Tin Pan’s real movie-style popcorn) and beverages available for purchase.

Altman

Tuesday, July 12, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is closed.

LOCATION

Tin Pan Theater

DESCRIPTION

Robert Altman won the Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement after being nominated for Best Director five times. This father of American independent cinema left an indelible mark, not merely on the evolution of his art form, but also on the western zeitgeist. His style of filmmaking covered many genres, but usually with a "subversive" twist, which typically relied on satire and humor to express his personal views. Altman developed a reputation for being "anti-Hollywood" and non-conformist in both his themes and directing style. Actors especially enjoyed working under his direction because he encouraged them to improvise, thereby inspiring their own creativity. Altman explores and celebrates the epic fifty-year redemptive journey of one of the most important and influential filmmakers in the history of the medium.  Altman’s best-known films include MASH, The Long Goodbye, The Player, Short Cuts, and Gosford Park.

(2014, 96 mins, directed by Ron Mann)

FACILITATOR

Sharon Dawn

The Brainwashing of My Dad

Tuesday, July 26, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is closed.

LOCATION

Tin Pan Theater

DESCRIPTION

As Jen Senko tries to understand the transformation of her father from a nonpolitical Democrat to an angry Republican fanatic, she uncovers the forces behind the media that changed him completely: a plan by Roger Ailes under President Richard Nixon for a media takeover by the Republicans, the 1971 Powell Memo urging business leaders to influence institutions of public opinion (especially the media, universities, and courts), the 1987 dismantling of the Fairness Doctrine under President Ronald Reagan, and the signing of the 1996 Telecommunications Act under President Bill Clinton. The documentary aims to show how media and the nation changed, which leads to questions about who owns the airwaves, what rights listeners and watchers have, and what responsibility the government has to keep the airwaves fair, accurate, and accountable.

(2015, 90 mins, directed by Jen Senko)

facilitator

John Rhetts

The Secret Life of Chaos

Tuesday, August 9, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

Registration is closed.

LOCATION

Tin Pan Theater

DESCRIPTION

Chaos theory has a bad name, conjuring up images of unpredictable weather, economic crashes, and science gone wrong. But there is a fascinating and hidden side to Chaos, one that scientists are only now beginning to understand. It turns out that chaos theory answers a question that mankind has asked for millennia: how did we get here?

In this documentary, Professor Jim Al-Khalili sets out to uncover one of the great mysteries of science—how does a universe that starts off as dust end up with intelligent life? How does order emerge from disorder? It's a mind-bending, counterintuitive, and for many people a deeply troubling idea.

(2010, 60 mins, directed by Nic Stacey)

FACILITATOR

Ron Polidan

Biking Borders

Tuesday, August 23, 1:30–3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Tin Pan Theater

DESCRIPTION

Biking Borders is unlike any other travel documentary. While most people go on a journey to escape the daily grind or out of sheer wanderlust, Max and Nono had a different motivation. The two best friends ride 15,000 kilometers by bike from Berlin to Beijing to raise funds for the construction of an elementary school. In a humorous and honest way, the film shows that anything—really anything—is possible if you just want it hard enough. Although they both hate riding bikes, Max and Nono make it to China in nine months while thousands of people follow their journey live on Instagram. How they then manage to travel through snow, ice, desert, and rivers, flee from wild animals, and—last but not least—build two schools for more than 1500 children, shows a unique mix of beautiful shots and unedited Instagram Stories.

(2021, 90 mins, directed by Max Jabs)

FACILITATOR

Tom Carroll

SOCIALS AND Special Events

Join us for periodic social events that supplement our lectures, courses, and groups. Zoom links are emailed to all members the day before the start date, unless otherwise indicated. Follow the links in the titles below to view full descriptions and information.

First Thursday Social Hour

First Thursdays, 3:00–4:00 p.m.

LOCATION

Zoom

DESCRIPTION

We miss seeing each other! We are all doing what we must to stay safe during this pandemic, but it is difficult not being together. Through our offerings of Zoom classes and meetings, we have found that people are showing up to the meeting early to chat with each other. We realized we don't need a meeting or a class to do this! Mark your calendars to join us virtually on the first Thursdays of the month. Bring your beverage of choice and join us! This social hour is open to members of all sites.

It really makes a surprising difference in our outlook just to see each other on the computer and talk. We hope to see you there!

HOSTS

Central Oregon Membership Committee

Summer Picnics in Central Oregon

Thursday, July 21 and Friday, August 12, noon

LOCATION

Pine Nursery Park 3750 NE Purcell Blvd, Bend 97701

description

Pack a brown-bag lunch and join your OLLI-UO friends for an outdoor lunch at the Pine Nursery pavilion! Members should enter the park from Purcell Blvd near Ponderosa Elementary School. While we plan to gather under the pavilion, members are welcome to bring their own chairs. Let’s catch up while we enjoy some food and sunshine!

For more information or to inform us you plan to attend, please look up Elizabeth or Gary’s contact information in the Central Oregon member directory behind the OLLI-UO Member Portal.

hosts

Elizabeth Polidan and Gary Whiteaker

New Member Welcome

Wednesday, August 10, 1:30–3:00 p.m.

location

Baker Downtown Center, Elks Lodge, and Zoom

DESCRIPTION

New Member Welcome is a great opportunity for members who have enrolled in OLLI-UO in recent months at all three program sites to meet fellow new members, program staff, and member-leaders. We plan to share helpful hints on how to maximize your OLLI-UO experience, with a special focus on navigating the Program Schedule and Calendar—so that you can stay informed about our program’s many offerings. Program staff and member-leaders will be on hand to answer questions at the end of the presentation.

Email invitations will be sent to all OLLI-UO members who have enrolled in the past year.

Central Oregon Governing Council Forum

Tuesday, August 16, 10:30 a.m.

Location

Please contact osher@uoregon.edu for location information.

Description

Central Oregon Governing Council members Elizabeth Poildan and John Rhetts invite any members interested in Council to attend a forum on Tuesday, August 16. Elizabeth and John provide an overview of what the Council does, discuss what is entailed in serving, and share the time commitment.

Four Governing Council seats in Central Oregon will become vacant and must be filled by election the end of September. If you would like to nominate someone or learn more about the Governing Council, please contact John or Elizabeth by looking them up in the member directory or by emailing osher@uoregon.edu. Prior to submitting a name, please ensure that nominees have confirmed their willingness to serve on the Governing Council. Self-nominations are happily accepted.

ABOUT THE GOVERNING COUNCIL

OLLI-UO in Central Oregon is led by its Governing Council, which establishes committees and sets program priorities, policies, and budgets consistent with UO rules and our own bylaws. Council currently meets once per month—historically in the fourth week. Members are elected by the general membership for two-year terms, which are staggered so that vacancies do not occur all at the same time. From within the Council, four officers are elected: President, Vice President, Finance Officer, and Recording Secretary. Current Council members and officers are listed on our website.

hosts

Elizabeth Polidan (Council President) and John Rhetts (Council Member)

Coffee with Friends

Fourth Mondays, 10:00 a.m.

NOTE: Coffee with Friends is on hiatus this summer and will return in September.

Location

Fifth Street Public Market, Eugene

DESCRIPTION

Friends, conversation, coffee—what could better? Coffee with Friends is a casual, morning social event held monthly on the Eateries level (top floor) of the Fifth Street Public Market in Eugene. (Look for the pushed together tables in the main, central seating area.)

Buy a cup of coffee downstairs, then come upstairs and be part of the conversation—about OLLI or anything else that's on your mind.

No reservations necessary—just come on by!

HOSTS

Eugene/Springfield Membership Committee

Fourth Friday Meet and Greet

Fourth Fridays, 2:00–3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Zoom

DESCRIPTION

Get together with your fellow members at our regular OLLI-UO Meet and Greet on the 4th Friday every month!

Please stop in and visit for a while! This is designed as a drop-in event. You need not join exactly at the meeting start—feel free to stay for as long or as little as you like. We always have a nice, fun group of people at our Meet and Greets who enjoy a strictly social OLLI-UO event. Remember, making friends and building community is essential for our mental health!

HOST

Hannelore Burnstein, Eugene/Springfield Membership Committee

TOURS AND FIELD TRIPS

Join us for periodic tours and field trips that supplement our lectures, courses, and groups. Registration is required. Follow the links in the titles below to view full descriptions and information.

Cultural Prineville Tour: Bowman Memorial Museum, County Courthouse, Rim Rock Gallery

Wednesday, August 24, 11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

DESCRIPTION

Join OLLI-UO in Central Oregon members for an exploration of Prineville’s cultural and historic landmarks. Begin the day with a self-guided tour at the A.R. Bowman Memorial Museum, a local history museum that opened in 1971. The museum is housed in the old Crook County Bank Building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The second stop is the Crook County Courthouse for a guided tour. The courthouse was built in 1909 from native basalt and was one of the tallest buildings in Oregon at the time. It boasts a basement, two main floors, an attic, and a three-story clock tower, with an optional steep climb to the top of the tower available to participants.

We take a break from all the touring for lunch at the Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Ron’s Comfort Food Café. The restaurant offers salads, sandwiches, and burgers. Participants should be prepared to purchase their lunch.

The day ends with a visit to Rimrock Art Gallery, a 2,800 square foot gallery featuring paintings and bronze sculptures by established Central Oregon and the Northwest.

11:00 a.m.–noon A.R. Bowman Memorial Museum (self-guided tour)

noon–1:00 p.m. Crook County Courthouse (docent-guided tour)

1:00–2:00 p.m. Meadow Lakes Golf Course for lunch– Ron’s Comfort Food

2:00–3:00 p.m. Rimrock Art Gallery (optional)

Length of Event: approximately four hours

meeting time/place and expected return

Members driving from Bend are invited to meet at the Barnes and Noble parking lot in the Forum Shopping Center at 10:00 a.m., where they can organize carpools. Expect to return to Bend no earlier than 3:00 p.m. if partaking in all activities.

Participants are advised to wear comfortable shoes and be prepared to walk and stand for several hours. The courthouse tour offers an optional steep climb to the top of the clock tower. Participants should also be prepared to purchase lunch at Meadow Lakes Golf Course. There is no fee for the museum, courthouse, or art gallery. Please contact field trip coordinator Bonnie Campbell (contact info may be found in the Central Oregon member directory behind the OLLI-UO Member Portal) with additional questions.

Tour of Peter DeFazio Bridge

Friday, August 12, 2:00—3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Peter DeFazio Bridge (Alton Baker Park, Eugene)

DESCRIPTION

The Eugene-Springfield area has the distinction of having three innovative, award-winning pedestrian bridges (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge). Gary Rayor, the Engineer of Record (EoR) for all three projects, will lead this field trip to the Peter DeFazio Bridge to view and further discuss the structure.

This field trip is a follow-up to a full presentation on the Peter DeFazio Bridge (also given by Rayor) on Tuesday, August 9.

Tour of Gateway/I-5 Bridge

Friday, August 19, 2:00—3:30 p.m.

LOCATION

Gateway/I-5 Bridge (The Shoppes at Gateway, Springfield)

DESCRIPTION

The Eugene-Springfield area has the distinction of having three innovative, award-winning pedestrian bridges (Peter DeFazio Bridge, Gateway/I-5 Bridge, Delta Ponds Bridge). Gary Rayor, the Engineer of Record (EoR) for all three projects, will lead this field trip to the Gateway/I-5 Bridge to view and further discuss the structure.

This field trip is a follow-up to a full presentation on the Gateway/I-5 Bridge (also given by Rayor) on Tuesday, August 16.

 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at the University of Oregon